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  • 1. Arnseth, Hans Christian
    et al.
    Hanghøj, ThorkildDuus Henriksen, ThomasMisfeldt, MortenRamberg, RobertStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Selander, StaffanStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Games and Education: Designs in and for Learning2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We live in a time of educational transformations towards more 21st century pedagogies and learning. In the digital age children and young people need to learn critical thinking, creativity and innovation and the ability to solve complex problems and challenges. Traditional pedagogies are in crisis and many pupils experience school as both boring and irrelevant. As a response educators and researchers need to engage in transforming education through the invention of new designs in and for learning. This book explores how games can provide new ideas and new designs for future education. Computer games have become hugely popular and engaging, but as is apparent in this book, games are not magical solutions to making education more engaging, fun and relevant. 

    Games and Education explores new designs in and for learning and offer inspiration to teachers, technologists and researchers interested in changing educational practices. Based on contributions from Scandinavian researchers, the book highlights participatory approaches to research and practice by providing more realistic experiences and models of how games can facilitate learning in school. 

  • 2. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    Brynielsson, Joel
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. FOI Swedish Defence Research Agency, Sweden.
    Design of simulator training: a comparative study of Swedish dynamic decision-making training facilities2021In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 21, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulator training is becoming increasingly important for training of time-critical and dynamic situations. Hence, how simulator training in such domains is planned, carried out and followed up becomes important. Based on a model prescribing such crucial aspects, ten decision-making training simulator facilities have been analyzed from an activity theoretical perspective. The analysis reveals several conflicts that exist between the training that is carried out and the defined training objectives. Although limitations in technology and organization are often alleviated by proficient instructors, it is concluded that there is a need for a structured approach to the design of training to be able to define the competencies and skills that ought to be trained along with relevant measurable training goals. Further, there is a need for a pedagogical model that takes the specifics of simulator training into account. Such a pedagogical model is needed to be able to evaluate the training, and would make it possible to share experiences and make comparisons between facilities in a structured manner.

  • 3. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    Larsson, Magnus
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Mitchel, Michael
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ungerth, Stefan
    LVC i vardagen - framtidens flygträning2017Report (Other academic)
  • 4. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Mitchell, Mikael
    Persson, Tomas
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Sweden.
    Romero, Mario
    ter Vehn, Pontus
    Supporting after action review in simulator mission training: Co-creating visualization concepts for training of fast-jet fighter pilots2019In: The Journal of Defence Modeling and Simulation: Applications, Methodology, Technology, ISSN 1548-5129, E-ISSN 1557-380X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 219-231Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the design and evaluation of visualization concepts supporting After Action Review (AAR) in simulator mission training of fast-jet fighter pilots. The visualization concepts were designed based on three key characteristics of representations: re-representation, graphical constraining, and computational offloading. The visualization concepts represent combined parameters of missile launch and threat range, the former meant to elicit discussions about the prerequisites for launching missiles, and the latter to present details of what threats a certain aircraft is facing at a specific moment. The visualization concepts were designed to: 1) perceptually and cognitively offload mental workload from participants in support of determining relevant situations to discuss; 2) re-represent parameters in a format that facilitates reading-off of crucial information; and 3) graphically constrain plausible interpretations. Through a series of workshop iterations, two visualization concepts were developed and evaluated with 11 pilots and instructors. All pilots were unanimous in their opinion that the visualization concepts should be implemented as part of the AAR. Offloading, in terms of finding interesting events in the dynamic and unique training sessions, was the most important guiding concept, while re-representation and graphical constraining enabled a more structured and grounded collaboration during the AAR.

  • 5. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Effektiv simulatorträning: Slutrapport projekt Effektiv flygträning och utbildning 2015-20172017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of what constitutes effective flight training and education is complex and can be approached in different ways. The research project "Effective fighter pilot training and education" (2015-2017) has scientifically and methodically worked on integrating pedagogical models and practical experience in flight training, taking into account organizational structures. Furthermore, systematic design work of visual support for debriefings has been conducted. This report integrates project activities, research questions and project results in a coherent description. Additional support (both tools and methods) is needed to analyze complex scenarios and measures that can pinpoint the performance of the pilot or group of pilots. Based on complex measures, two visualizations that provide an overview of the pilot's shooting moment and threat picture have been developed. Both visualizations, Missile launch and Threat range, have been evaluated in conjunction with Swedish air force fighter pilots and are presented in the report. Furthermore, the project have successfully used machine learning to categorize pilots' communication with the aim of assessing efficiency, and to identify any deficiencies through visualizations of the results. Educational models, visualizations, as well as empirical studies of simulator facilities also provide a basis for a discussion of what characterizes efficient simulator facilities and effective simulation training. Studies of the LVC (Live, Virtual & Constructive) concept, which means that training in one and the same scenario is done with real aircraft and pilots, pilots in flight simulators and artificial agents, have been conducted. Additionally, the project has introduced the concept of "LVC in everyday training", a vision of seamless integration of real aircraft and pilots in simulated aircraft. The activities of the project have largely been carried out in cooperation and in relation to the IMTR II (International Mission Training Research II) cooperation agreement with U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Within the collaboration, the project has contributed to a demonstration of LVC capabilities where FLSC were the only European participant. The project intends to continue this collaboration and focus on LVC to further approach the vision of LVC as an integral part of regular training. The report recommends a future research agenda.

  • 6. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    Mitchel, Mikael
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Woltjer, Rogier
    Live Virtual Constructive i framtida luftstridsövningar: Enkät- och workshopstudie i samband med Arctic Challenge Exercise 20212022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport fokuserar på luftstridsträningskonceptet Live, Virtual och Constructive (LVC). Två studier med fokus på LVC som träningskoncept och dess träningsvärde genomfördes i anslutning till Arctic Challenge Exercise 2021 (ACE 21). I den första studien fyllde flygförare i en enkät med fokus på upplevt träningsvärde relativt lärandemål för genomförda flygpass, samt frågor om LVC som framtida träningskoncept. I den andra studien reflekterade flygförare som deltagit vid ACE 21 kring träningsvärde av LVC och erhållna svar från enkäten. Enkätresultaten visar att skattningar av upplevt träningsvärde varierar mellan de olika lärandemålen och mellan olika uppdragstyper med avseende på det uppdrag som just flugits. Träningsvärdet hos de olika lärandemålen samvarierar kring olika stadier av uppdragsplanering och -genomförande. Från den andra studien kan konstateras att flygförarna identifierade både styrkor och svagheter med att inkludera V- och C-entiteter i luftstridsövningar. Särskilt viktigt att poängtera är att de inte har tilltro till att C-entiteter kan ersätta flygförare på blå sida i verkliga flygfarkoster. Flygförarna är positiva till att introducera V- och C-entiteter för att kunna genomföra stora scenarier, särskilt om de agerar på motståndarsidan. Slutligen konstateras att skattning av upplevt träningsvärde relativt definierade lärandemål utgör ett tolkningsbart instrument för att undersöka träningsvärde vid stora luftstridsövningar. 

  • 7.
    Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Swedish Air Force Combat Simulation Centre (FLSC), Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Sweden.
    Artman, Henrik
    Swedish Air Force Combat Simulation Centre (FLSC), Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Sweden; Division of Media Technology and Interaction Design, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mitchell, Mikael
    Division of Media Technology and Interaction Design, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Swedish Air Force Combat Simulation Centre (FLSC), Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Sweden.
    Woltjer, Rogier
    Swedish Air Force Combat Simulation Centre (FLSC), Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Sweden.
    A live mindset in Live Virtual Constructive simulations: a spin-up for future LVC-air combat training2023In: The Journal of Defence Modeling and Simulation: Applications, Methodology, Technology, ISSN 1548-5129, E-ISSN 1557-380X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 447-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining Live, Virtual, and Constructive (LVC) aircraft in the same training scenario holds promise for developing and enhancing fighter pilot training. The simulator study reported here builds on joint pilot-researcher co-design work of beyond visual range LVC training (LVC-T) scenarios to provide training value to pilots in both Live and Virtual aircraft. One fourship of pilots simulated Live entities by acting under peacetime restrictions, while other pilots acted as during regular Virtual training. The objective was to investigate pilots’ reflections on the implications of LVC-T and on the methodology used to provide hands-on experience of a plausible LVC-T scenario. The purpose is to inform the design and use of future LVC in air combat training from the perspective of training value. Results indicate that pilots are positive toward the LVC scenario design, especially the dynamics that a large-scale scenario brings to training of decision making. They indicate a high degree of presence, the need for specific regulations to enforce flight safety, and that restrictions put on the simulated Live entities had implications for the other pilots. In addition to regular Live (L) and simulator (V + C) training, LVC-T may enhance pilots’ repertoires and decision-making patterns.

  • 8.
    Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Swedish Defence Research Agency FOI, Sweden.
    Artman, Henrik
    Swedish Defence Research Agency FOI, Sweden; KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mitchell, Mikael
    Swedish Defence Research Agency FOI, Sweden.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Woltjer, Rogier
    Swedish Defence Research Agency FOI, Sweden.
    LVC Allocator: Aligning training value with scenario design for envisioned LVC training of fast-jet pilots2022In: The Journal of Defence Modeling and Simulation: Applications, Methodology, Technology, ISSN 1548-5129, E-ISSN 1557-380X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 287-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Live virtual constructive (LVC) flight simulations mix pilots flying actual aircraft, pilots flying in simulators, and computer- generated forces, in joint scenarios. Training resources invested in LVC scenarios must give a high return, and therefore pilots in both live aircraft and simulators need to experience training value for the extensive resources invested in both, an aspect not emphasized in current LVC research. Thus, there is a need for a function, in this article described as LVC Allocator, which assures that complex LVC training scenarios include aspects of training value for all participants, and, thus, purposefully align scenario design with training value. A series of workshops were carried out with 16 fast-jet pilots articulating the training challenges that LVC could contribute to solving, and allocating LVC entities in a training scenario design exercise. The training values for LVC included large scenarios, weapon delivery, flight safety, adversary performance, and weather dependence. These values guided the reasoning of how to allocate different entities to L, V, or C entities. Allocations were focused on adversaries as V, keeping entity types together, weather dependence, low-alti- tude and supersonic flying requirements, and to let L entities handle and lead complex tasks to keep the human in the loop.

  • 9. Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Artman, Henrik
    Mitchell, Mikael
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Woltjer, Rogier
    LVC Allocator och White Wizard: Fundament för träningsvärde i framtida Live-Virtual-Constructive luftstridsträning2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport fokuserar på LVC-träning (LVC-T) som träningskoncept där verkliga flygfarkoster (Live), simulerade flygfarkoster (Virtual) och datorgenererade flygfarkoster (Constructive) integreras i gemensamma träningsscenarion och övningar. Centralt har varit att anpassa konceptet LVC-T till en svensk kontext för att effektivisera träning och utvärdering av prestation och förmåga i framtida luftstridsträning. För att detta ska kunna uppnås är det viktigt att flygförare i både verkliga och simulerade flygfarkoster får ett bra träningsvärde, som definieras som det mervärde(ökade/förbättrade färdigheter, erfarenheter och/eller kunskap) flygförare uppnår genom att delta i ett givet träningsscenario. För att söka säkerställa att flygförare i verkliga och simulerade flygfarkoster får bra träningsvärde genomfördes workshopar kring den föreslagna rollen ”LVC Allocator” med flygförare för att utforska LVC som träningskoncept, identifiera svårigheter i existerande träning som LVC-träning kanavhjälpa samt designa LVC-träningsscenarier med utgångspunkt i bra träningsvärde förflygförare i verkliga och simulerade flygfarkoster. För att utvärdera LVC träningsscenarier och undersöka om avsedda träningsvärden kan uppnås, planerades och genomfördes tre empiriska studier kallade ”White Wizard”, baserade på workshopserien LVC Allocator. Studierna genomfördes med enbart simulerade flygfarkoster därflygförare i simulatorer tilldelades egenskapen verklig flygförare med vissa tillhörande restriktioner. Utvärderingen bygger på resultat från dessa tre studier, och mer specifikt gruppenkäter som diskuterades och fylldes i av de enheter som ingick i scenariot, en gemensam debriefing som hölls med samtliga ingående enheter samt en individuell enkätsom nyttjades vid ett av de tre tillfällena. Resultaten visar att ansatserna LVC Allocator och White Wizard tillsammans kan användas för att utvärdera LVC-träningsscenarieroch om avsedda träningsvärden uppnås. Med användning av denna typ av simuleringar kan komplikationer i LVC-träningsscenarier och -upplägg på ett kostnadseffektivt sätt identifieras och successivt anpassas före det att dessa omsätts till verklig LVC-träning. Deltagande flygförare rapporterar över lag att upplägget medger inlevelse och insikt iLVC, bra träningsvärde samt att de är positivt inställda till framtida LVC-träning.Aspekter i scenariot som gav bra träningsvärde var bland annat att det innehöll ett flertal beroende beslutspunkter, oförutsägbarhet samt ett stort antal enheter som krävde samordning. Fortsatt utredning och implementering av LVC-T rekommenderas.

  • 10.
    Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut (FOI), Sverige.
    Artman, Henrik
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mitchell, Mikael
    Försvarsmakten, Sverige.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Woltjer, Rogier
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut (FOI), Sverige.
    Träningsvärde för alla! Live-Virtual-Constructive föreffektiv luftstridsträning: Årsrapportering projekt ”LVC för effektiv flygträning” år 2019: [Training value for all! Live Virtual Constructive for effective air combat training]2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Träningskonceptet Live-Virtual-Constructive (LVC) där stridspiloter i verkliga flygfarkoster tränar tillsammans med stridspiloter i simulatorer och datorgenererade entiteter utgör en möjlig framtida form av flygstridsträning. Forskning om vilket träningsvärde LVC-T erbjuder stridspiloter i verkliga och simulerade flygfarkoster är sällsynt. Denna forskning studerar därför LVC som träningskoncept tillsammans med stridspiloter. Rapporten studerar och redovisar risker, utmaningar, möjligheter med och förutsättning för införandet av LVC-Träning (LVC-T). Data som ligger till grund för denna rapport härstammar från a) utvärderingar som genomförts i simulatormiljö (kallade White Wizard) av LVC-T-scenarier som designades av stridspiloter med fokus på träningsvärde för stridspiloter i verkliga och simulerade flygfarkoster, samt b) en enkät som besvarades av flygförare vid Arctic Challenge Exercise 2021 (ACE21) med fokus på träningsvärde och LVC-T. Data från utvärderingarna har analyserats utifrån två teoretiska perspektiv, Learning Design Sequences (LDS) och Aktivitetsteori, för att identifiera möjligheter och utmaningar med LVC-T. En identifierad utmaning handlar om tvetydighet om vilka regler som ska gälla för verkliga respektive virtuella flygfarkoster då de agerar i samma träningsscenario. Data från ACE21-enkäten presenteras i denna rapport med deskriptiv statistik. Flygförarna var generellt positiva till övningen ACE21 ur ett träningsvärdesperspektiv och ger uttryck för att nyttjandet av LVC i stora övningar kan stärka träningsvärdet ytterligare.

  • 11.
    Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    FOI/FLSC.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Immersiva lösningar för Flygsimulatorer: Statusuppdatering 20222022Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut (FOI), Sverige.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Woltjer, Rogier
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut (FOI), Sverige.
    Tourde, Daniel
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut (FOI), Sverige.
    Immersiva lösningar för flygsimulatorer: Kartläggning av framtida studiebehov2021Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Aronsson, Sanna
    et al.
    FOI.
    Svensson, Jonathan
    FOI.
    Nilsson, Victor
    FOI.
    Larsson, Magnus
    FM.
    Wikberg, Per
    FOI.
    Tooloutalaie, Neda
    FOI.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Woltjer, Rogier
    FOI.
    Lindqvist, Jouni
    FOI.
    Tomac, Maximilian
    FOI.
    Studie om träningsvärde simulator JTAC: Behovsinventering Och Möjliga Lösningar2021Report (Other academic)
  • 14. Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    House, David
    Hultén, Magnus
    Karlgren, Klas
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Interactionary as a Didactic Format in Design Education2015In: KTH Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 2015: Abstracts, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project-based education allows students to explore real-world problems and challenges. It can also bemore cost-effective than traditional teaching and individual tutoring. However, projects are sometimes messy, need a long takeoff roll and risk being difficult to monitor by teachers. There is a need to better understand and support students’ creative design processes. We propose the ‘interactionary’ format as providing one way forward to meet these needs. An ‘interactionary’ is a highly time-constrained collaborative design assignment which forces students to complete a design task live on stage (Berkun, 2001). We present findings from three separate case studies in which the format has been tested. The studies involved students of interaction design (Ramberg, Artman, Karlgren, 2013) and chemical engineering (Artman, House, Hultén 2014) as well as multidisciplinary student teams (Artman, House, Hultén, Ramberg, Unpublished).

    Our results show that the interactionary as a didactic format engages students and allows them to explore a messy design space. Furthermore, three phases of the design process were identified in all studies: ideation, sketching and reflection/evaluation. The groups displayed differences in their multimodal approach to design. For example, the engineering students mainly made use of ephemeral communication strategies (gestures and speech) rather than sketching with physical materials, while the two other student groups employed physical materials (clay, lego, paper sketching) to a higher degree. Furthermore, there was a tendency for the design objective to override the specific competences of the participating individuals whereby the design process became a collaborative team effort. Students mainly made use of their everyday knowledge, indicating a need to better address domain knowledge (in interaction design, chemical engineering or other domains respectively). Nevertheless, all thirteen groups in the three studies articulated and produced prototypes and basic use-scenarios within the time-limit which shows that the format engages the students and enables a short project takeoff. There remains, however, the need for research into how teachers can instruct, coach and intervene in the design process as well as in the use of disciplined domain knowledge.

  • 15. Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlgren, Klas
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Strååt, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Designing Interaction in Interaction Design: Using interactionarires in order to understand student use of interaction design concepts2012In: Designs for Learning 2012: Conference Proceedings, Copenhagen, Denmark: Aalborg University , 2012, p. 14-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design is about designing interaction. But how do first year students of interaction design understand and use concepts of interaction in their design processes? By interaction analysis of video material we analyse how students used concepts adhering to interaction. The aspect most frequently used was interactivity. Interaction was mainly handled by using spoken language. While working with physical materials, talk about interaction decreased.

  • 16. Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Lindquist, Sinna
    Mitchell, Mikael
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Utforskande av träningsvärde för Live och Virtual: Avrapportering projekt "LVC för effektiv flygträning" år 20182018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring training value for Live and Virtual

    This report describes work done to explore and adapt LVC, a training concept that integrates real aircraft (Live), manned flight simulators (Virtual) and artificial agents (Constructive), into a Swedish context for the purpose of streamlining training and evaluation of performance and ability in complex and distributed systems. Particularly focused in this text is the training needs and training value, defined as the increased training value that pilots, in airplanes, and manned simulators, receive when participating in training involving real aircraft, simulators and artificial agents. To study training needs and training value of LVC training, three main activities were carried out: (1) a literature review of scientific studies about LVC and training effect. Results show that research and evaluation of the LVC concept have largely focused on technical aspects of LVC, rather than training value, (2) workshops for exploring added value at LVC training. Results show that the L-entity receives the best training value because pilots in airplanes can experience and train decision making in larger and more realistic scenarios under physical stress and unexpected events, and (3) conducting an experimental study (Wizard-of-Oz) at FLSC (Flygvapnets luftstridssimuleringscenter) where pilots in simulators in a fictitious LVC-test flew against what they thought were pilots in airplanes. Pilots who participated in the study stated that they thought it was a true LVC-test and acted accordingly. In debriefing, the pilots reported that pilots in simulators cannot get more out of LVC training than they can get out of regular simulator training. Results from the study further point to the importance of the design of training scenarios, so that both pilots in airplanes and simulators can get a good training effect. The report also provides for cooperation and information exchange with international partners. The report ends with a description of the project's focus 2019.

  • 17. Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sundholm, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ceratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Action Context and Target Context Representations: A Case Study on Collaborative Design Learning2005In: International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL):: learning 2005: the next 10 years! / [ed] Koschman, T. et al, International Society of the Learning Sciences , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Daniel, Spikol
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Otero, Nuno
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Exploring Teachers’ perspectives on the use of Mobile devices for Math and Language Learning2014In: Conference proceedings: 4th international Designs for Learning conference 6-9th May 2014, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Otero, Nuno
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Purposeful Learning Across Collaborative Educational Spaces2014In: 11 th International conference of the learning sciences: proceedings / [ed] Joseph L. Polman et al, New York: International Society of the Learning Sciences , 2014, p. 1597-1598Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20. Disanayeke, Uvasara
    et al.
    Hewagamage, K. P.
    Wikramanayake, Gihan Nilendra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    A Theoretical Framework to Conduct Informal Mobile-Learning Research in Agriculture2013In: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ADVANCES IN ICT FOR EMERGING REGIONS (ICTer) - 2013: CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS, IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 283-283Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile devices have been successfully used in facilitating learning in informal education. In the study reported on here, we propose designing mobile based informal learning in the domain of agriculture to aware farmers on better farming practice. Thus, learning is referred to as in-situ practice of agriculture compared to traditional classroom learning. The facilitation of communication and interaction among farmers and other stakeholders is important to foster informal learning. Accordingly interactive mobile-learning environments can encourage participatory attitudes, excite interest and commitment among learners and thus become important in adult learning.

  • 21. Dissanayeke, U.
    et al.
    Hewagamage, K. P.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wikramanayeke, G. N.
    Informal m-learning research in agriculture: An activity theory based approach2014In: EDULEARN14 Proceedings, International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED) , 2014, p. 3450-3458Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22. Dissanayeke, Uvasaara
    et al.
    Hewagamage, Hewa
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wikramanayake, Gihan
    Twitter in Informal Agriculture Education: An Activity Theory Based Analysis of a Mobile Learning Approach2013In: EDULEARN13 Proceedings, International Academy of Technology, Education and Development (IATED) , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile learning is defined by Keegan (2005) as basically a learning method which provides education and training on mobile phones. This is mostly from the point of view of the technology that is used to initiate learning. The second approach to define mobile learning is from the point of view of the learner. Accordingly, mobile learning is defined as any sort of learning that happens when the learner is not at a fixed, predetermined location, or learning that happens when the learner takes advantage of the learning opportunities offered by mobile technologies (Malley et al., 2003).This study attempts to evaluate the impact of a Twitter based mobile learning project conducted among a group of distance learners using Twitter mobile SMS option. We have delivered a series of short lessons related to agriculture among 20 young farmers since October, 2012 – March 2013. The lessons basically used Question & Answer format so as to improve student engagement and learning; which also helped in overcome 140 character limitation of Twitter.   The aim of the study was to assess impact of mobile learning programme as a guided informal learning method, in the light of Activity theory. The activity theory has being used to structure the study, and also to derive the research questions related to user satisfaction, learning community, tools, learning resources, and user control aspects. The activity theory has been used as a guide to capture the dynamics of mobile learning context throughout the study. Other methodologies, including participatory methods such as key informant discussions, case studies and focus groups were also used to understand the interrelationships among the concepts. The study reveals the limitations and challenges faced by the learners when participating in the SMS based mobile learning programme. Furthermore it suggests on how to improve the mobile learning situation to maximize its benefits for the participants from the learner point of view while discussing the possibility of using mobile learning in the domain of agriculture as guided informal learning method. In future, the findings will be used to further improve the mobile learning programme, and to test the applicability of the same mobile learning procedure among other communities.

  • 23. Dissanayeke, Uvasaara
    et al.
    Hewagamage, K. P.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wikramanayake, G. N.
    Twitter Micro-Blogging Based Mobile Learning Approach to Enhance the Agriculture Education Process2013In: Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference on Mobile Learning 2013 / [ed] Inmaculada Arnedillo Sánchez, Pedro Isaías, International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24. Dissanayeke, Uvasara
    et al.
    Hewagamage, Kamalanath P
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Colombo, school of computing, .
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wikramanayake, Gihan Nilendra
    Creating m-Learning opportunities using mobile SMS based Twitter implementation to facilitate collaborative learning2014In: ICTer 2014: fourteenth International Conference on Advances in ICT for Emerging Regions (ICTer2014), IEEE Computer Society, 2014, p. 49-54Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Dissanayeke, Uvasara
    et al.
    Hewagamage, Kamalanath P
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Colombo, School of computing, .
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wikramanayake, Gihan Nilendra
    Initiating m-learning among a group of young farmers from Kandy district Sri Lanka: an activity theory based approach2014In: 26th Annual Congress of the Postgraduate Institute of Agriculture, Peradenyia: University of Peradenyia , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Dissanayeke, Uvasara
    et al.
    University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.
    Hewagamage, K.P.
    University of Colombo, Sri Lanka.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wikramanayake, Gihan
    University of Colombo, Sri Lanka.
    Initiating m-learning among a group of young farmers from Kandy district Sri Lanka: An activity theory based approach.2014In: Journal of Tropical Agriculture, ISSN 0971-636X, E-ISSN 0973-5399, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 26-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile phones have been successfully used in agriculture information dissemination. However, there was little emphasis on how to use them in facilitating learning. This study was conducted to define the learning context, with an aim to initiate mobile learning research, in agriculture informal learning. Objectives of the study were to i) define the mobile learning context in relation to Activity Theory principles, ii) describe the present methods of communications and interactions among the study community, and iii) explore the limitations in the traditional non-formal learning context and possible solutions. A design based research methodology, which is informed by Activity Theory principles, was adopted to define the learning context. Members of the Young Farmer Club (YFC), Ankumbura were selected for the study, while data were collected using quantitative and qualitative methods. The availability of mobile phones was quite high (76%) among the study group, while mobile based interactions were commonly used in accessing agriculture related information. Present methods of interactions and communications among the study group were found to be inefficient, costly and time consuming. Thus, they preferred an efficient, low cost, and simple method to replace the existing systems. They further needed a mobile based learning system to help gain knowledge on general agricultural practices. Future research is necessary to develop a suitable communication and interaction system and a mobile learning system.

  • 27.
    Ekanayake, Hiran B.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Colombo School of Computing, Sri Lanka.
    Backlund, Per
    Ziemke, Tom
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hewagamage, Kamalanath P.
    Lebram, Mikael
    Comparing Expert Driving Behavior in Real World and Simulator Contexts2013In: International Journal of Computer Games Technology, ISSN 1687-7047, E-ISSN 1687-7055, Vol. 2013, article id 891431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer games are increasingly used for purposes beyond mere entertainment, and current hi-tech simulators can provide quite, naturalistic contexts for purposes such as traffic education. One of the critical concerns in this area is the validity or transferability of acquired skills from a simulator to the real world context. In this paper, we present our work in which we compared driving in the real world with that in the simulator at two levels, that is, by using performance measures alone, and by combining psychophysiological measures with performance measures. For our study, we gathered data using questionnaires as well as by logging vehicle dynamics, environmental conditions, video data, and users' psychophysiological measurements. For the analysis, we used several novel approaches such as scatter plots to visualize driving tasks of different contexts and to obtain vigilance estimators from electroencephalographic (EEG) data in order to obtain important results about the differences between the driving in the two contexts. Our belief is that both experimental procedures and findings of our experiment are very important to the field of serious games concerning how to evaluate the fitness of driving simulators and measure driving performance.

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  • 28.
    Ekanayake, Hiran B.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Skövde, Sweden; University of Colombo School of Computing, Sri Lanka.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ziemke, Tom
    Backlund, Per
    Hewagamage, Kamalanath P.
    Affective Realism of Animated Films in the Development of Simulation-Based Tutoring Systems2013In: International Journal of Distance Education Technologies, ISSN 1539-3100, E-ISSN 1539-3119, Vol. 11, no 2, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study focused on comparing real actors based scenarios and animated characters based scenarios with respect to their similarity in evoking psychophysiological activity for certain events by measuring galvanic skin response (GSR). In the experiment, one group (n=11) watched the real actors’ film whereas another group (n=7) watched the animated film, which had the same story and dialogue as the real actors’ film. The results have shown that there is no significant difference in the skin conductance response (SCR) scores between the two groups; however, responses significantly differ when SCR amplitudes are taken into account. Moreover, Pearson’s correlation reported as high as over 80% correlation between the two groups’ SCRs for certain time intervals. The authors believe that this finding is of general importance for the domain of simulation-based tutoring systems in development of and decisions regarding use of animated characters based scenarios.

  • 29.
    Ekanayake, Hiran B.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Colombo School of Computing, Sri Lanka.
    Per, Backlund
    Ziemke, Tom
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hewagamage, Kamalanath P.
    Lebram, Mikael
    Comparing Expert and Novice Driving Behaviour in a Driving Simulator2013In: IxD&A: Interaction Design and Architecture(s), ISSN 1826-9745, E-ISSN 2283-2998, no 19, p. 115-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study focused on comparing driving behavior of expert and novice drivers in a mid-range driving simulator with the intention of evaluating the validity of driving simulators for driver training. For the investigation, measurements of performance, psychophysiological measurements, and self-reported user experience under different conditions of driving tracks and driving sessions were analyzed. We calculated correlations between quantitative and qualitative measures to enhance the reliability of the findings. The experiment was conducted involving 14 experienced drivers and 17 novice drivers. The results indicate that driving behaviors of expert and novice drivers differ from each other in several ways but it heavily depends on the characteristics of the task. Moreover, our belief is that the analytical framework proposed in this paper can be used as a tool for selecting appropriate driving tasks as well as for evaluating driving performance in driving simulators.

  • 30.
    Ekanayake, Hiran
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Skövde, Sweden; University of Colombo School of Computing, Sri Lanka.
    Backlund, Per
    Ziemke, Tom
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hewagamage, Kamalanath
    Assessing Performance Competence in Training Games2011In: Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction: Proceedings, Part II / [ed] Sidney D’Mello, Arthur Graesser, Björn Schuller, Jean-Claude Martin, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 518-527Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In-process assessment of trainee learners in game-based simulators is a challenging activity. This typically involves human instructor time and cost, and does not scale to the one tutor per learner vision of computer-based learning. Moreover, evaluation from a human instructor is often subjective and comparisons between learners are not accurate. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an automated, formula-driven quantitative evaluation method for assessing performance competence in serious training games. Our proposed method has been empirically validated in a game-based driving simulator using 7 subjects and 13 sessions, and accuracy up to 90.25% has been achieved when compared to an existing qualitative method. We believe that by incorporating quantitative evaluation methods like these future training games could be enriched with more meaningful feedback and adaptive game-play so as to better monitor and support player motivation, engagement and learning performance.

  • 31.
    Ekanayake, Hiran
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Skövde, Sweden; University of Colombo School of Computing, Sri Lanka.
    Backlund, Per
    Ziemke, Tom
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hewagamage, Kamalanath
    Game Interaction State Graphs for Evaluation of User Engagement in Explorative and Experience-based Training Games2010In: 2010 International Conference on Advances in ICT for Emerging Regions (ICTer), 2010, p. 40-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing interest to use computer games for non-traditional education, such as for training purposes. For training education, simulators are considered as offering more realistic learning environments to experience situations that are similar to real world. This type of learning is more beneficial for practicing critical situations which are difficult or impossible in real world training, for instance experience the consequences of unsafe driving. However, the effectiveness of simulation-based learning of this nature is dependent upon the learner's engagement and explorative behaviour. Most current learner evaluation systems are unable to capture this type of learning. Therefore, in this paper we introduce the concept of game interaction state graphs (GISGs) to capture the engagement in explorative and experience-based training tasks. These graphs are constructed based on rules which capture psychologically significant learner behaviours and situations. Simple variables reflecting game state and learner's controller actions provide the ingredients to the rules. This approach eliminates the complexity involved with other similar approaches, such as constructing a full-fledged cognitive model for the learner. GISGs, at minimum, can be used to evaluate the explorative behaviour, the training performance and personal preferences of a learner.

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  • 32.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mobile Devices as Support Rather than Distraction for Mobile Learners: Evaluating Guidelines for Design2011In: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, ISSN 1941-8647, E-ISSN 1941-8655, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article questions the design of mobile learning activities that lead students to spend time focusing on the mobile devices at the expense of interacting with other students or exploring the environment. This problem is approached from an interaction design perspective, designing and analysing geometry-learning activities. The authors present six guidelines for designing mobile learning activities, where mobile devices support rather than distract students from contents and contexts relevant to the learning goals. The guidelines are developed through video analysis of groups of middle school students doing learning activities outdoors and evaluated using the task model. The guidelines suggest that students (1) assume roles based on a different functionality of each device, (2) use devices as contextual tools, that the activities, (3) include physical interaction with the environment, (4) let teachers assume roles, (5) encourage face-to-face communication, and (6) introduce students to the mobile devices.

  • 33.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Evaluating Interaction with Mobile Devices in Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning2012In: WMUTE '12 Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE Seventh International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education, Washington, DC, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2012, p. 92-96Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We evaluate to what extent students are interacting with mobile devices in one of four ways intended in the design of a mobile learning activity. Video data from one class of fifth grade students were analyzed using a model of four different types of interaction. The evaluation shows that the students interacted with the devices in the ways intended in design 64% of the time. The contribution is an approach for translating learning goals to interaction design goals in mobile learning research. We conclude that this approach can be of value in designing and evaluating interaction with mobile devices for an entire mobile learning activity.

  • 34.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Using smartphones and QR codes for supporting students in exploring tree species2013In: Scaling up Learning for Sustained Impact: 8th European Conference, on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2013, Paphos, Cyprus, September 17-21, 2013. Proceedings / [ed] Davinia Hernández-Leo, Tobias Ley, Ralf Klamma, Andreas Harrer, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 436-441Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smartphones are increasingly being used on field trips to support students in exploring the natural world. In this paper we present a design and analysis of an inquiry-based learning field trip for primary school students. One problem for design is how to make use of smartphones to support, rather than distract, students in interacting with the physical environment. We approach this problem by comparing two alternative designs, where students use smartphones for identifying tree species either by using an identification instrument or by reading a text description. The results show that students made use of the instrument for identification, QR codes, for identifying tree species and made use of the text descriptions for searching for tree species. In this sense, QR codes, connecting contextual information on smartphones to the physical environment, work as a learning tool that may be used for orienting students in their interaction with the physical environment.

  • 35.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Design Heuristics for Balancing Visual Focus on Devices in Formal Mobile Learning Activities2010In:  , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Design Guidelines for Location-Based and Contextual Learning Supported by Mobile Devices2012In: International Journal of Handheld Computing Research, ISSN 1947-9158, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 26-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In location-based and contextual mobile learning, students are continually mobile in the virtual, social, and physical environment. A common problem in this view of mobile learning is that students spend time focusing on the mobile devices at the expense of interacting with other students or exploring the physical environment. The authors approach this problem from an interaction design perspective, where they design and analyse geometry-learning activities in two iterations. Based on video data from groups of students participating in the learning activities, the authors analyse when mobile devices are in the foreground and background of their interaction. The authors present six guidelines for designing location-based and contextual mobile learning activities, where mobile devices support rather than distract students from contents and contexts relevant to the learning goals. Finally, the guidelines are evaluated using a model of interaction, which represents mobile device interaction as one of four different modes of human interaction with technology.

  • 37.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Design-Oriented Research or Research-Oriented Design in Mobile Learning?2010In: Norditel 2010 Book of abstracts, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Design research in mobile learning is challenging. In this position paper, we suggest that the dichotomy between design-oriented research and research-oriented design can help explicate the role of different design activities in mobile learning research.

  • 38.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Get the bees away from the hive: Balancing visual focus on devices in mobile learning2010In: IADIS International Conference Mobile Learning 2010, Porto, Portugal, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39. Faraon, Montathar
    et al.
    Rönkkö, Kari
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Learning by coding: A sociocultural approach to teaching web development in higher education2020In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 1759-1783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As information technology continues to evolve rapidly in society, coding skills become increasingly essential to develop. The purpose of this article is to examine differences between the learner-centered and sociocultural approaches when teaching and learning coding in higher education. A quasi-experiment was applied over six academic semesters evaluating the mentioned approaches in terms of students' explicit attitudes, grades, and course evaluations. The findings indicated that the sociocultural approach may be a viable alternative to the learner-centered approach. More specifically, students indicated a preference for the sociocultural approach over the learner-centered approach, a greater number of students who passed the courses were educated via the sociocultural approach, and overall satisfaction was significantly higher for this approach as well. While the sociocultural approach has demonstrated to be advantageous, its integration in courses must concurrently be carefully balanced against constraints that teachers continuously experience in higher education, such as time and resources, which presents a challenge to the design of courses and to academia at large.

  • 40.
    Faraon, Montathar
    et al.
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Villavicencio, Victor
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Kaipainen, Mauri
    From mobilization to consensus: Innovating cross-media services to organize crowds into collaborative communities2013In: CeDEM 2013: Proceedings of the Conference for E-Democracy and Open Governement (Revised Edition) / [ed] Peter Parycek, Noella Edelmann, Edition Donau-Universität Krems , 2013, p. 215-228Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 41. Hans Christian, Arnseth
    et al.
    Hanghøj, Thorkild
    Thomas, Duus Henriksen
    Morten, Misfeldt
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Selander, Staffan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Introduction: Scandinavian Perspectives2018In: Games and Education: Games and Education / [ed] Hans Christian Arnseth, Thorkild Hanghøj, Thomas Duus Henriksen, Morten Misfeldt, Robert Ramberg, Staffan Selander, Brill Academic Publishers, 2018, no 1, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Jander, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Borgwall, Jonathan
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Towards a Methodological Framework for HMI Readiness Evaluation2012In: Proceedings of the Human facotrs and Ergonomics Society, Sage Publications, 2012, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 2349-2353Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to define and evaluate a methodological framework for human-machine interaction (HMI) readiness evaluation in system development for complex, high risk, and task-critical environments. The long-term objective is to establish a HMI readiness evaluation framework for environments with these characteristics, in this specific case HMI development for fighter aircrafts. Based on literature studies a series of interviews were conducted to identify shortcomings of current practices and methods, and define requirements for an enhanced methodology. The results were further explored during facilitated workshops with HMI subject matter experts. The overall result is a methodological framework based on triangulation of many already established evaluation methods and techniques, combined with a set of measurable HMI criteria. Inspired by risk management practices, the result of the proposed methodology is presented in a HMI assessment matrix. This matrix is proposed to form the basis of the HMI evaluation and assessment.

  • 43.
    Johansson, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Verhagen, Harko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Selander, Staffan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Åkerfeldt, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Weidong, Chen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Design for meaningful learning: balancing learning- and game components2014In: DSV writers hut 2014: proceedings, Stockholm: Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University , 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44. Karlgren, Klas
    et al.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Use of Design Patterns in Overcoming Misunderstandings in Collaborative Interaction Design2012In: CoDesign - International Journal of CoCreation in Design and the Arts, ISSN 1571-0882, E-ISSN 1745-3755, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 231-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In collaborative design there is a need to create a shared understanding of design ideas and proposals. Misunderstandings and communication breakdowns often get in the way and need to be resolved. Little empirical research has addressed the use of design patterns in collaborative design work. An empirical study was carried out on students’ collaboration while working on design tasks. Data were analysed using interaction analysis focusing on how the participants resolved misunderstandings and communication breakdowns, and the role of design patterns. Particular attention was paid to gaps in the collaboration; situations where designers had difficulties understanding each other and how to continue the design work. One type of gap concerned difficulties seeing or finding solutions to problems. However, many gaps concerned how to define or frame problems underlying design proposals. The results contradict the conception that design patterns are examples serving the role of inspiration for reuse of design ideas: simply showing a pattern solution was not enough to resolve gaps. The main observations were that patterns had an important role in overcoming difficulties in discussions regarding rationales and problem framing, and explicitly referring to design patterns by their names was decisive for the patterns to become useful.

  • 45. Karlgren, Klas
    et al.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Artman, Henrik
    Designing interaction: How do interaction design students address interaction?2016In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 439-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design is usually described as being concerned with interactions with and through artifacts but independent of a specific implementation. Design work has been characterized as a conversation between the designer and the situation and this conversation poses a particular challenge for interaction design as interactions can be elusive and difficult to describe. Moreover, current trends in interaction design introduce physical materials to a higher degree resulting in even more complex design situations. There is a lack of knowledge about how interaction designers, and especially students, address the very phenomenon of interaction. This study contributes by describing how interaction design students attempt to address aspects of interaction and by presenting an in-depth analysis in the context of an interactionary-type design exercise. The quantitative and qualitative findings showed that (1) the design students brought up aspects of interactivity and dynamics through talk and gestures but (2) a comprehensive design idea about interaction did not guide the design work and they were to a little degree engaged in planning sequences of interactions or interaction on a longer time scale, (3) using physical materials disrupted interaction design, and, (4) there was a lack of continuity when addressing interaction compared to how proposals about artifacts were pursued. As interaction is the core of interaction design, the findings are discussed in terms of how the immaterial design materials may “talk back” to designers. Practical strategies for how the observed phenomena could be constructively addressed within interaction design education are suggested.

  • 46.
    Karlström, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tools, language technology and communication in computer assisted language learning2006In: Writing and digital media / [ed] Luuk Van Waes, Mariëlle Leijten, Christine M. Neuwirth, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2006, 1. ed.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Karlström, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tools, language technology and communication in computer assisted language learning2006In: Writing and digital media / [ed] Luuk Van Waes, Mariëlle Leijten, Christine M. Neuwirth, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2006, p. 189-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    A Pattern Approach to the Design of Technology Mediated Collaborative Learning in Primary Schools2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present an ongoing research project focusing how to use design patterns as a way to support teachers’ design processes of their teaching supported by collaborative technology. The aim is to equip teachers with design methods and tools for a sustainable use of current and future technology in schools.

  • 49.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Collaborative Pattern Language Representation of Designs for Learning2016In: Short papers, 2016, p. 39-45Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the article we present how teachers by use of design patterns in a participatory design process have captured their experiences of using information technology in teaching. Focus in the design patterns shifted over time from focusing difficulties with technology and proposed solutions to these to didactic and pedagogical aspects of technology use in teaching and learning. A thematic analysis of the teachers’ patterns and pattern languages building on the themes “context of the teacher”, “context of the pupils” and “technology”, is presented. Writing of design patterns helped teachers see relations and dependencies between problems and solutions that would otherwise be difficult to see while the writing of the design patterns simultaneously counted as doing designs for learning.

  • 50.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Deltagande design av undervisning2018In: Att bli lärare / [ed] Eva Insulander, Staffan Selander, Stockholm: Liber , 2018, p. 278-283Chapter in book (Other academic)
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