Change search
Refine search result
1 - 28 of 28
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Berg, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Thern, Emelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Using repeated measures to study the contribution of alcohol consumption and smoking to the social gradient in all‐cause mortality: Results from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort2023In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 1850-1859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The social gradient in consumption behaviours has been suggestedto partly explain health inequalities. The majority of previous studies have onlyincluded baseline measurements and not considered potential changes in behav-iours over time. The study aimed to investigate the contribution of alcohol con-sumption and smoking to the social gradient in mortality and to assess whetherthe use of repeated measurements results in larger attenuations of the main asso-ciation compared to using single baseline assessments.

    Methods: Longitudinal survey data from the population-based Stockholm PublicHealth Cohort from 2006 to 2014 was linked to register data on mortality until2018 for 13,688 individuals and analysed through Cox regression.

    Results: Low socioeconomic position (SEP) was associated with increased mortal-ity compared with high SEP; hazard ratios 1.56 (95% CI 1.30–1.88) for occupa-tional status and 1.77 (95% CI 1.49–2.11) for education, after adjustment fordemographic characteristics. Using repeated measurements, alcohol consumptionand smoking explained 44% of the association between occupational status andall-cause mortality. Comparing repeated and baseline measures, the percentageattenuation due to alcohol consumption increased from 11% to 18%, whereas itremained similar for smoking (25–23%).

    Discussion and Conclusions: Smoking and alcohol consumption explained alarge part of the association between SEP and mortality. Comparing results fromtime-fixed and time-varying models, there was an increase in overall percentageattenuation that was mainly due to the increased proportion explained by alcoholconsumption. Repeated measurements provide a better estimation of the contri-bution of alcohol consumption, but not smoking, for the association between SEPand mortality.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Burström, Bo
    Thern, Emelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Do early life factors explain the educational differences in early labour market exit? A register-based cohort study2023In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Socioeconomic inequalities in labour market participation are well established. However, we do not fully know what causes these inequalities. The present study aims to examine to what extent factors in childhood and late adolescence can explain educational differences in early labour market exit among older workers.

    Methods: All men born in 1951–1953 who underwent conscription examination for the Swedish military in 1969–1973 (n = 145 551) were followed from 50 to 64 years of age regarding early labour market exit (disability pension, long-term sickness absence, long-term unemployment and early old-age retirement with and without income). Early life factors, such as cognitive ability, stress resilience, and parental socioeconomic position, were included. Cox proportional-hazards regressions were used to estimate the association between the level of education and each early labour market exit pathway, including adjustment for early life factors.

    Results: The lowest educated men had a higher risk of exit through disability pension (HR: 2.72), long-term sickness absence (HR: 2.29), long-term unemployment (HR: 1.45), and early old-age retirement with (HR: 1.29) and without income (HR: 1.55) compared to the highest educated men. Factors from early life explained a large part of the educational differences in disability pension, long-term sickness absence and long-term unemployment but not for early old-age retirement. Important explanatory factors were cognitive ability and stress resilience, whilst cardiorespiratory fitness had negligible impact.

    Conclusions: The association between education and early exit due to disability pension, long-term sickness absence and long-term unemployment was to a large part explained by factors from early life. However, this was not seen for early old-age retirement. These results indicate the importance of taking a life-course perspective when examining labour market participation in later working life.

  • 3.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol and suicide in Eastern Europe2008In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 361-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: The aim of this paper was to estimate how suicide rates in seven eastern European countries are affected by changes in population drinking and to put the results into a comparative perspective. DESIGN AND METHODS: The analysis included data on annual suicide mortality rates and per capita consumption for the post-war period from: Russia, Belarus, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, the former Czechoslovakia and the former German Democratic Republic (GDR). Overall and gender-specific models were estimated using the Box-Jenkins technique for time-series analysis. The estimates were pooled into two groups, i.e. spirits countries (Russia, Belarus and Poland) and non-spirits countries (Hungary, Bulgaria, former Czechoslovakia and former GDR). RESULTS: All countries obtained positive alcohol effect estimates. The effects on the overall population were largest in the spirits countries, where a 1-litre increase in per capita consumption was associated with an increase in overall suicide rates of 5.7-7.5%. The effects were somewhat smaller in the non-spirits countries, 2.7-4.7%. The estimates for males were larger, but showed the same national variations as the overall population estimates. The female estimates were generally smaller than for men and did not differ between the two country groups. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that per capita consumption matters for suicide mortality in these eastern European countries, but that the strength of the relationship is contingent upon the drinking culture, so that it tends to be stronger in countries with detrimental drinking patterns.

  • 4.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol and the experience of adverse consequences analyses of self-reported data from Poland and the Baltic countries: Paper presented at the 34th Annual Alcohol Epidemiology Symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society (KBS 2008) in Victoria, June 2-6, 2008.2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Alcohol-Related Problems in Eastern Europe: A Comparative Perspective2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates the association between alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm in Eastern Europe. The main aim was to estimate to what extent changes in per capita alcohol consumption have an impact on different forms of alcohol-related mortality, and to put the results in an international comparative perspective. The thesis includes four papers; the first two papers use aggregate time-series analysis to assess how changes in per capita consumption affect rates in suicide mortality and fatal non-intentional injuries in several Eastern European countries, respectively. The third paper applies the same methodological approach to analyse the population-level relationship between alcohol and homicide in Russia and the U.S.. The fourth paper employs survey data to assess how the risk of experiencing alcohol-related problems in relation to volume of consumption in the Baltic countries compares to Sweden and Italy. The results of the first three papers suggests: (i) that changes in per capita consumption are significantly related to changes in mortality rates of suicide, non-intentional injuries and homicide in the countries under study; (ii) that the relationship is stronger for men than for women, and (iii) that the relationship tends to be stronger in the countries with more detrimental drinking patterns, e.g. Russia. The results of the fourth paper suggest that the risk of experiencing alcohol-related problems in relation to level of drinking in the Baltic countries is similar to the corresponding risk in Sweden, but considerably stronger than in Italy. In conclusion, the findings support the significance of a public health approach to alcohol-related problems in Eastern Europe, i.e., policy measures directed towards total alcohol consumption. In addition, strategies aimed at reducing the occurrence of binge drinking seem to have great potential for reducing alcohol-related harm and mortality in Eastern European countries.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 6.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Per Capita Alcohol Consumption and Suicide Rates in the U.S., 1950–20022009In: Journal of Suicide and Life-threatening Behaviour, ISSN 0363-0234, E-ISSN 1943-278X, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 452-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to estimate how suicide rates in the United States are affected by changes in per capita consumption during the postwar period. The analysis included Annual suicide rates and per capita alcohol consumption data (total and beverage specific) for the period 1950–2002. Gender- and age-specific models were estimated using the Box-Jenkins technique for time series analysis. No significant estimate was found for males. For females the total alcohol estimate (0.059) was significant at the 10% level whereas the spirits estimate was significant with an effect of 0.152. The results imply that a change in U.S. per capita consumption would result in a change in female suicide rates, whereas the male rates would not be affected.

     

  • 7.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Population drinking and fatal injuries in Eastern Europe: A time-series analysis of six countries2010In: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 43-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To estimate to what extent injury mortality rates in 6 Eastern European countries are affected by changes in population drinking during the post-war period. Data and Methods: The analysis included injury mortality rates and per capita alcohol consumption in Russia, Belarus, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria and the former Czechoslovakia. Total population and gender-specific models were estimated using auto regressive integrated moving average time-series modelling. Results: The estimates for the total population were generally positive and significant. For Russia and Belarus, a 1-litre increase in per capita consumption was associated with an increase in injury mortality of 7.5 and 5.5 per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively. The estimates for the remaining countries ranged between 1.4 and 2.0. The gender-specific estimates displayed national variations similar to the total population estimates although the estimates for males were higher than for females in all countries. Conclusions: The results suggest that changes in per capita consumption have a significant impact on injury mortality in these countries, but the strength of the association tends to be stronger in countries where intoxication-oriented drinking is more common.

  • 8.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Self-reported alcohol consumption and the risk of alcohol-related problems: A comparative risk-curve analysis of the three Baltic countries, Sweden and Italy2012In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 113-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research has suggested a positive risk-relationship between volume of consumption and adverse behavioural and social consequences of drinking. However, because the risk-relationship may be modified by factors such as pattern of drinking, attributes of social drinking contexts and drunken comportment, the shape of the risk-function appear to be contingent upon the larger cultural context of drinking. Methods: In this paper I use graphical risk-curve analyses and model estimations to assess how the risk of experiencing alcohol-related problems is associated with self-reported volume of alcohol consumption in the three Baltic countries; Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania  as well as Sweden and Italy. The rationale behind the choice of countries was to obtain a basis for comparing the risk curves for the Baltic countries with the risk-curves for two countries representing distinct types of the western European drinking cultures. The analyses utilised data from two general population surveys (including Sweden plus Italy and the Baltic countries, respectively) with approximately 1000 respondents from each country. Results: The slopes of the risk-curves for the Baltic countries were generally parallel to those of for Sweden, but significantly steeper than for Italy. This result suggests that (i) the risk for alcohol-related problems in the Baltic countries increases with volume of consumption in a way that is similar to northern Europe, and (ii) that increasing volume of consumption is associated with a considerably higher risk of experiencing alcohol-related problems in the Baltic countries (and Sweden) than in Italy. The result also suggests that increasing volume of consumption is associated with the risk of experiencing a larger number of different problems in the Baltic countries and Sweden than in Italy. Conclusions: The results were in line with the hypothesis of a European north to south gradient in the strength of the risk-relationship, but also add that the Baltic countries may be placed alongside the Nordic countries in this context. Since only volume of consumption is considered, the results cannot be used to specify which factors and mechanisms that actually modify the shape of the risk-function in each culture.

  • 9.
    Landberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Anna-Karin
    Falkstedt, Daniel
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Fathers' Alcohol Consumption and Long-Term Risk for Mortality in Offspring2018In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 753-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study examined associations between fathers' alcohol consumption and risk for total and cause-specific mortality in offspring. Short summary: We examined the associations between fathers' alcohol consumption and total and cause-specific mortality in adult offspring. Fathers' alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk of alcohol-related mortality in offspring. The association appeared to be weaker for causes of death in which alcohol plays a smaller, or less direct, role. Methods: Data on fathers' alcohol consumption, and offspring's risky use of alcohol, smoking, mental health and contact with police/childcare authorities were collected among 46,284 men (sons) aged 18-20 years, during conscription for compulsory military training in 1969/70. Data on offspring mortality were obtained from the National Cause of Death register, 1971-2008. The mortality outcomes included total mortality, alcohol-related causes of death and violent causes of death (categorized into suicides vs violent/external causes excluding suicides). Results: Compared to sons whose fathers never used alcohol, the risk for total and alcohol-related mortality among sons increased with the father's consumption level. The risk of violent death was significantly elevated among sons whose fathers drank alcohol occasionally or often, but the risk of suicide increased in the highest consumption category only. After adjustment for covariates, the results remained for alcohol-related mortality whereas they were significantly attenuated, or disappeared, for total mortality, violent death and suicide. Conclusions: Fathers' alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of alcohol-related mortality in the offspring. Alcohol use among fathers also increases the offspring's risk of later total mortality, suicide and violent death, but these associations appear to be mediated or confounded by factors related to parental drinking and/or adverse childhood psychosocial circumstances.

  • 10.
    Landberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Anna-Karin
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Fathers’ alcohol use and suicidal behaviour in offspring during youth and young adulthood2019In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-690X, E-ISSN 1600-0447, Vol. 140, no 6, p. 563-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To examine the association between various indicators of father's alcohol use and suicidal behaviour in offspring during youth and young adulthood.

    Methods

    The study is based on a cohort of 68 910 Swedish citizens who were born between 1970 and 1985 and have fathers who participated in conscription for compulsory military training in 1969/70. Information on fathers’ alcohol use was collected during conscription. Offspring was followed for suicide attempts or completed suicides (through linkage with national registers) from age 12 to end of follow‐up in 2008.

    Results

    After adjustment for confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) for offspring to fathers who were heavy drinkers was 1.4 (95% CI 1.02, 1.93) while the associations turned non‐significant for offspring to fathers who often drank into intoxication, HR 1.14 (0.68, 1.90). The highest risk for suicidal behaviour was found for offspring to fathers who had been apprehended for drunkenness two times or more, or with an alcohol‐related hospitalization, with adjusted HRs of 2.1 (1.4, 3,14) and 1.9 (1.27, 2,85) respectively.

    Conclusion

    Fathers’ alcohol use is associated with increased risk of suicidal behaviour among offspring in youth and young adulthood.

  • 11.
    Landberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; The Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sydén, Lovisa
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The Contribution of Alcohol Use, Other Lifestyle Factors and Working Conditions to Socioeconomic Differences in Sickness Absence2020In: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 40-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This study investigates how alcohol use contributes to the social gradient in sickness absence. Other factors assessed include lifestyle factors (smoking, physical activity and body mass index), physical and psychosocial working conditions. Methods: The study used baseline data from the Stockholm public health cohort 2006, with an analytical sample of 17,008 respondents aged 25-64 years. Outcome variables included self-reported short-term (<14 days) and register-based long-term (>14 days) sickness absence. Socioeconomic position (SEP) was measured by occupational class. Alcohol use was measured by average weekly volume and frequency of heavy episodic drinking. Negative binominal regression was used to estimate sex-specific SEP differences in sickness absence, before and after adjusting for alcohol use and the additional explanatory factors. Results: Adjusting for alcohol use attenuated the SEP differences in long-term sickness absence by 20% for men and 14% for women. Alcohol use explained a smaller proportion of the differences in short-term sickness absence. Alcohol use in combination with other lifestyle factors attenuated the SEP differences (20-35%) for both outcomes. Physical working conditions explained more than half of the gradient in long-term sickness absence, whereas psychosocial conditions had greater impact on short-term sickness absence among men. Discussion/Conclusion: Alcohol use explains a substantial proportion of the SEP disparities in long-term sickness absence among men. The effect is smaller among women and for short-term sickness absence. Our findings support the notion that physical working conditions constitute the key explanatory variable for SEP differences in long-term sickness absence, but add that psychosocial working conditions have greater impact on the gradient in short-term sickness absence among men.

  • 12.
    Landberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Norström, Thor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol and homicide in Russia and the United States – a comparative analysis2011In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1937-1888, E-ISSN 1938-4114, Vol. 72, no 5, p. 723-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The object of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the aggregate relationship between alcohol and homicide in Russia and in the United States. The comparison was based on the magnitude of the alcohol effect, the alcohol attributable fraction (AAF), and the degree to which total consumption could account for trends in homicide. Method: We analyzed total and sex-specific homicide rates for the age groups 15-64 years, 15-34 years, and 35-64 years. The study period was 1959-1998 for Russia and 1950-2002 for the United States. For the United States, alcohol consumption was gauged by sales of alcohol; for Russia, estimated unrecorded consumption was included as well. The data were analyzed through autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) modeling. Results: The results show that, for Russia as well as for the United States, a 1-L increase in consumption was associated with an increase in homicides of about 10%, although the absolute effect was markedly larger in Russia because of differences in homicide rates. The AAF estimates suggested that 73% and 57% of the homicides would be attributable to alcohol in Russia and in the United States, respectively. Most of the temporal variation in the Russian homicide rate could be accounted for by the trend in drinking, whereas the U.S. trend in total alcohol consumption had a more limited ability to predict the trend in homicides. Conclusions: We conclude that the role of alcohol in homicide seems to be larger in Russia than in the United States.

  • 13.
    Landberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Distribution of sickness absence risk across different levels and patterns of drinking: findings from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort2021In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 305-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study estimated (i) the risk function between different indicators of alcohol use and long-term sickness absence, adjusting for possible confounding factors, (ii) whether the risk function between average volume of consumption and sickness absence is modified by heavy episodic drinking (HED), and (iii) to what extent the risk for sickness absence among abstainers is due to health selection bias. Data and methods: The study was based on data from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort 2006, with an analytical sample of 16,477 respondents aged 18–64 years. The outcome included register-based long-term (> 14 days) sickness absence. Negative binominal regression was used to estimate the association between sickness absence and average weekly volume of consumption, frequency of HED, and both in interaction. Results: Abstainers, chronic heavy drinkers and respondents with the highest frequency of HED had approximately two-fold higher rates of sickness absence relative to the reference groups, i.e., moderate drinkers and those with HED one to 6 times per year. Adjustment for confounding factors did not materially affect the shape of the risk function. After exclusion of abstainers with alcohol-related problems, or poor health, the estimates for abstainers became non-significant. Moderate drinkers with HED did not have significantly higher rates of sickness absence than moderate drinkers without HED. Conclusions: Our results suggest a significant association between alcohol use and sickness absence. There were indications that the U-shaped risk function may largely be due to health selection bias among abstainers. We found no indication of effect modification of HED on moderate drinking.

  • 14.
    Landberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Thern, Emelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Is the association between alcohol use and sickness absence modified by socioeconomic position? findings from the Stockholm public health cohort2023In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe distribution of sickness absence tends to be socially patterned less is however known about the underlying mechanisms and pathways of the social gradient found in sickness absence. The present study aims to investigate (i) if the risk function between average volume of alcohol consumption and sickness absence is modified by socio-economic position (SEP), and (ii) whether such an effect modification can be attributed to differences in drinking patterns and other risk factors including other lifestyle behaviours, health status, and working conditions.MethodsThe study was based on data from the Stockholm public health cohort 2006, with an analytical sample of 13 855 respondents aged 18-64 years. Self-reported information on occupational class (a measure of SEP), alcohol consumption, other lifestyle behaviour, health and working conditions was collected from the survey. The outcome of long-term (> 14 days) sickness absence between 2006 and 2008 was obtained from national registers. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate the Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).ResultsIn the initial analyses, heavy drinking manual workers had a 5-fold increased risk of long-term sickness absence compared to non-manual employees who were moderate drinkers, and approximately 60% of the excess risk among heavy drinking manual workers was attributable to an interaction between alcohol use and SEP. Adjusting for working conditions was associated with the largest attenuation of the risk estimate, compared to other lifestyle behaviors and health. In the fully adjusted model, the IRR was further attenuated for the manual workers and the joint effect of SEP and heavy drinking remained in the final model with an attributable proportion of 49%.ConclusionsIndividuals in Sweden with lower levels of SEP appear to be more vulnerable to alcohol consumption in relation to sickness absence, where differences in working conditions explained a large part but not all of the differential vulnerability.

  • 15.
    Landberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Trolldal, Björn
    Norström, Thor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Is the theory of collectivity of drinking cultures valid across educational groups?2021In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 472-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction 

    To explore whether Skog's theory of collectivity of drinking cultures is valid across groups with different socioeconomic position (SEP).

    Methods

    Individual‐level information on alcohol consumption and SEP for the years 2004–2014 were retrieved from the Monitoring Project; a nationally representative monthly alcohol use survey. The analytical sample consisted of 162 369 respondents aged 25–79 years. SEP was measured by education level. Alcohol use was measured by yearly volume of consumption and frequency of heavy episodic drinking (HED). Respondents were divided into six SEP‐groups based on their education level and sex. Mean yearly volume consumption and prevalence of monthly HED was calculated for each group and graphically plotted against the overall mean volume of consumption.

    Results

    The yearly changes in overall mean consumption during the study period reflected a collective shift in drinking across groups with basic, intermediate and high education. There were also indications that changes in overall mean consumption reflected collective shifts in the prevalence of HED across the SEP‐groups. Moreover, while the magnitude of the associations for both average volume and HED differed somewhat in strength across the SEP‐groups, they were clearly in the same, positive, direction.

    Discussion and Conclusions

    Our findings add support for including a socioeconomic dimension to Skog's theory of collectivity of drinking cultures. Future studies should replicate our analyses on cases and periods with more tangible changes in the price and availability of alcohol.

  • 16.
    Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm, Sweden.
    The association between population drinking and ischemic heart disease mortality in educational groups2023In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, article id agad033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large number of observational studies have found a J-shaped relationship between alcohol intake and ischemic heart disease (IHD) risk. However, some studies suggest that the alleged cardio-protective effect may be an artifact in the way that the elevated risk for abstainers is due to self-selection on risk factors for IHD. The aim of this paper is to estimate the association between alcohol and IHD-mortality on the basis of aggregate time-series data, where the problem with selection effects is not present. In addition, we will analyze SES-specific mortality to investigate whether there is any socio-economic gradient in the relationship at issue. SES was measured by educational level. We used IHD-mortality in three educational groups as outcome. Per capita alcohol consumption was proxied by Systembolaget’s alcohol sales (litres of alcohol 100% per capita 15+). Swedish quarterly data on mortality and alcohol consumption spanned the period 1991Q1–2020Q4. We applied SARIMA time-series analysis. Survey data were used to construct an indicator of heavy SES-specific episodic drinking. The estimated association between per capita consumption and IHD-mortality was positive and statistically significant in the two groups with primary and secondary education, but not in the group with postsecondary education. The association was significantly stronger the lower the educational group. Although the associations were generally stronger for males than for females, these differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Our findings suggest that the detrimental impact of per capita consumption on IHD-mortality was stronger the lower the educational group.

  • 17.
    Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    The link between per capita alcohol consumption and alcohol‐related harm in educational groups2020In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 656-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and Aims

    Research based on individual‐level data suggests that the same amount of alcohol yields more harm in low‐socioeconomic status (SES) groups than in high‐SES groups. Little is known whether the effect of changes in population‐level alcohol consumption on harm rates differs by SES‐groups. The aim of this study was to elucidate this issue by estimating the association between per capita alcohol consumption and SES‐specific rates of alcohol‐related mortality.

    Design and Methods

    Per capita alcohol consumption was proxied by Systembolaget's alcohol sales (litres 100% alcohol per capita 15+). Quarterly data on mortality and alcohol consumption spanned the period 1991Q1‐2017Q4. We used two outcomes: (i) alcohol‐specific mortality (deaths with an explicit alcohol diagnosis); and (ii) violent deaths. SES was measured by education. We used three educational groups: (i) low (<10 years); (ii): intermediate (10–12 years); and (iii) high (13+ years). We applied error correction modelling to estimate the association between alcohol and alcohol‐specific mortality, and seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average‐modelling to estimate the association between alcohol and violent deaths.

    Results

    The estimated associations between per capita consumption and the two outcomes were positive and statistically significant in the two groups with low and intermediate education, but not in the high education group. There was a significant gradient in the level of association between alcohol consumption and alcohol‐related harm by educational group; the association was stronger the lower the educational group.

    Discussion and Conclusions

    Our findings suggest that the association between per capita consumption and alcohol‐related harm was stronger the lower the educational group.

  • 18.
    Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Trolldal, Björn
    Drinking and acquisition of unrecorded alcohol across educational groups in Sweden2022In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 160-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: It is estimated that 18.5% of total alcohol consumption in Sweden in 2018 was unrecorded. However, little is known about the socio-economic profile of consumers of unrecorded alcohol. The aim of this study was to elucidate this issue by analysing data from a unique Swedish national repeated cross-sectional alcohol use survey.

    Methods: Individual-level information on alcohol consumption and socio-economic status (SES) for the years 2013–2018 was retrieved from the Monitoring Project; a nationally representative monthly alcohol use survey. The analytical sample comprised 64 375 respondents aged 25–74 years. SES was measured by educational level. We used three educational groups: (i) low (<10 years); (ii) intermediate (10–12 years); and (iii) high (13+ years). We included indicators of the following sources of unrecorded alcohol consumption: travellers' import, smuggled alcohol, home production, internet and illicit home-distilling. We estimated adjusted SES-specific means of the various forms of unrecorded consumption. The means were adjusted for the effects of age, sex and region.

    Results: There were no significant educational differences in the total of unrecorded alcohol consumption; the same holds true for home-production and internet. However, with respect to smuggled and home-distilling, a statistically significant educational gradient was observed with the lowest educational group scoring approximately four times higher than the highest.

    Discussion and Conclusions: Our findings suggest that there are no differences across educational groups in the consumption of unrecorded alcohol as a whole. However, consumption of smuggled alcohol and illicitly distilled spirits is elevated in the low educational group.

  • 19.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Population drinking and alcohol-related mortality in Eastern Europe – a comparison with Western Europe2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20. Raninen, Jonas
    et al.
    Livingston, Michael
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    To drink or not to drink: A study of the association between rates of non-drinkers and per drinker mean alcohol consumption in the Swedish general population2022In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1475-1483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Understanding how the mean consumption per drinker and rates of non-drinking interplay to form overall per capita alcohol consumption is imperative for our understanding of population drinking. The aim of the present study is to examine the association between rates of non-drinkers and per drinker mean alcohol consumption in the Swedish adult population and for different percentiles of drinkers.

    Methods: Data came from a monthly telephone survey of drinking habits in the Swedish adult population between 2002 and 2013. Alcohol consumption and non-drinking during the last 30 days were measured by beverage-specific quantity-frequency questions. Regression models estimated the association between the rate of non-drinkers and per drinker volume on annual data. Auto-regressive integrated moving average time-series models estimated the association on monthly data.

    Results: A significant (P < 0.01) negative association (−0.849) was found between the rate of non-drinkers and per drinker mean volume on annual data. A unit increase in non-drinking was associated with a decline of 0.85 cl of pure alcohol among drinkers. This finding was mirrored across all percentiles of consumption. The semi-log models found that a 1% unit increase in the rate of non-drinkers was followed by a 2% reduction in per drinker mean consumption. Auto-regressive integrated moving average time-series models verified these results.

    Discussion and Conclusions: There is a significant association between the proportion of non-drinkers and the amount of drinking among drinkers. The theory of collectivity of drinking cultures should also include the non-drinking part of the population. 

  • 21.
    Storbjörk, Jessica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    The new suit of the Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD): A well-tailored costume for tackling research and challenges ahead2020In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 592-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This overview reviews the establishment and evolution of the Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). It outlines its current organization and updated research direction, and discusses SoRAD’s future challenges and opportunities. SoRAD was established at Stockholm University to strengthen and support Swedish social science research on alcohol and drugs. It became active in 1999, and quickly grew in research efforts and reputation, while experiencing setbacks around 2006 and 2017. In 2018 SoRAD merged with the Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), to form a new Department of Public Health Sciences. In its new suit, SoRAD acts as a research centre within the teaching department. The research activities on alcohol and other drugs and gambling behaviour and problems may be categorized into four main areas: Social epidemiology; Subcultures and social worlds of use and heavy use; Policy formation, implementation and societal responses; and Societal and other collective definitions of problems and solutions. The new arrangements, with an increased staff pool and close interplay with higher education, provides a more stable and long-term platform for achieving the main mission of promoting and developing social science research on addictive substances and behaviours and related problems.

  • 22. Sundin, Erica
    et al.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Country-Level Heavy Episodic Drinking and Individual-Level Experiences of Harm from Others' Drinking-Related Aggression in 19 European Countries2022In: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 134-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There is limited knowledge about how individual experiences of harm from others’ drinking are influenced by heavy episodic drinking (HED) at the country level. The present study aimed to assess (1) the association between the country-level prevalence of HED and the risk of experiencing harm from others’ drinking-related aggression and (2) if HED at the country level modifies the association between consumption of alcohol per capita (APC) and such harm. Methods: Outcome data from 32,576 participants from 19 European countries stem from the RARHA SEAS study. Self-reported harm from others’ drinking included having been verbally abused, harmed physically, or having serious arguments. Data on country-level drinking patterns were derived from the World Health Organization. Associations between country-level prevalence of monthly HED and experiences of aggression (at least 1 of 3 studied harms) were derived through multilevel models – adjusted for country-level age structure and by including the respondent’s own HED patterns as a mediator. Results: A 1% increase in the prevalence of monthly HED was associated with 5% higher odds (odds ratio [OR] 1.05) of experiencing others’ alcohol-related aggression among men, and 6% (OR 1.06) among women. The results suggest that the association between APC and harm was stronger in countries with high prevalences of HED, but the modifying effect could not be confirmed. Discussion/Conclusion: Harm from others’ drinking-related aggression depends not only on individual factors but is also influenced by the drinking patterns of the population. However, the country-level prevalence of HED only explains a small part of the variance of this type of harm.

  • 23.
    Thern, Emelie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Falkstedt, Daniel
    Almroth, Melody
    Kjellberg, Katarina
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bodin, Theo
    Melin, Bo
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Educational qualification differences and early labor market exit among men: the contribution of labor market marginalization measured across the working life2022In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 1015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The present study aims to investigate the association between educational qualification and early labor market exit among men and to examine the contribution of labor market marginalization measured across the working life on this association.

    Method: A register-linked cohort study was conducted including men who completed military service in 1969/70 (born between 1949 and 1951) and were alive at age 55 and not disability pension beneficiaries (n = 40 761). Information on the highest level of educational qualification and the outcome of early exit (disability pension, sickness absence, unemployment, and early old-age pension) was obtained from Swedish nationwide registers between the ages of 55 and 64 years. Labor market marginalization was defined as periods of long-term unemployment and sickness absence over the working life and up to follow-up. Cox regression analyses were used to obtain hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

    Results: Low-educated men were more likely to leave the labor force early due to disability pension or sickness absence (HR: 2.48), unemployment (HR: 2.09), and early old-age pension with- (HR:1.25) and without -income (HR: 1.58). Labor market marginalization across the working life explained a large part of the association for the more involuntary early exit routes (disability pensions, sickness absence, unemployment) and explained very little with regards to the more voluntary early exit routes (early old-age pension with and without income).

    Conclusion: Exposure to labor market marginalization across the working life was important in explaining educational differences in early labor market exit due to disability pension or sickness absence and unemployment. This study underscores the importance of identifying and implementing preventive measures in the workplace (e.g. adaptions) to prevent new spells of sickness absence and unemployment, especially among low educated individuals.

  • 24.
    Thern, Emelie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Understanding the differential effect of alcohol consumption on the relation between socio-economic position and alcohol-related health problems: results from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort2021In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 116, no 4, p. 799-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To test (i) whether the harmful effects of average volume of alcohol consumption (AC) and heavy episodic drinking (HED) differ by socio‐economic position (SEP), and (ii) if so, to what extent such differential effects can be attributed to an unequal distribution of harmful levels and patterns of drinking, health, life‐style and social factors. Design A longitudinal cohort study with baseline in 2002 or 2006, with record‐linkage to national registers. Setting Stockholm County, Sweden. Participants A total of 37484 individuals, aged 25–70 years, responding to the survey in 2002 or 2006. Measurements The outcome of alcohol‐related health problems was obtained from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register using the Swedish index diagnoses related to alcohol use. Self‐reported information on occupational class (measure of SEP), AC, HED as well as other health‐related factors were extracted from the surveys. Average follow‐up time was 13.3 years. Findings During follow‐up, a total of 1237 first‐time events of alcohol‐related health problems occurred. After initial adjustments, heavy drinking appeared to be more harmful to individuals with low SEP compared with high SEP (P ¼ 0.001). Differences in HED frequency explained the largest part of the differential effect of AC. Engaging in weekly HED was more harmful to individuals with low SEP (P ¼ 0.031) than high SEP. Differences in AC, together with other factors, explained a large part of the differential effect of HED. Conclusions The greater adverse impact of alcohol consumption on health in Sweden on people with lower socio‐economic position may be largely attributable to higher prevalence of heavy episodic drinking, as well as other behavioral and social risk factors.

  • 25.
    Thern, Emelie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Educational differences in labor market marginalization among mature-aged working men: the contribution of early health behaviors, previous employment histories, and poor mental health2020In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 1784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social inequalities in labor force participation are well established, but the causes of these inequalities are not fully understood. The present study aims to investigate the association between educational qualification and labor market marginalization (LMM) among mature-aged working men and to examine to what extent the association can be explained by risk factors over the life course.

    Method: The study was based on a cohort of men born between 1949 and 1951 who were examined for Swedish military service in 1969/70 and employed in 2000 (n=41,685). Data on educational qualification was obtained in 2000 and information on the outcome of LMM (unemployment, sickness absence, and disability pension) was obtained between 2001 and 2008. Information on early health behaviors, cognitive ability, previous employment histories, and mental health was collected from conscription examinations and nationwide registers.

    Results: Evidence of a graded association between years of education and LMM was found. In the crude model, compared to men with the highest level of education men with less than 12years of schooling had more than a 2.5-fold increased risk of health-related LMM and more than a 1.5-fold increased risk of non-health-related LMM. Risk factors measured across the life course explained a large part of the association between education and health-related LMM (33-61%) and non-health-related LMM (13-58%).

    Conclusions: Educational differences remained regarding LMM among mature-aged workers, even after considering several important risk factors measured across the life course. Previous health problems and disrupted employment histories explained the largest part of the associations.

  • 26. Thor, Siri
    et al.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Anna-Karin
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Fathers' alcohol consumption and risk of substance-related disorders in offspring2022In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 233, article id 109354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have assessed how children are affected by parental alcohol consumption without clinically diagnosed alcohol problems, especially in relation to more long-term and severe consequences. The aim is to investigate how fathers’ alcohol use is related to the risk for substance-related disorders in offspring.

    Method: A prospective cohort study of 64 710 Swedish citizens whose fathers were conscripted for compulsory military training at ages 18–20 in 1969/70. Information on fathers’ alcohol consumption, frequency of intoxication and apprehended for drunkenness, was collected during conscription. Offspring was followed for substance-related disorders from age 12 to end of follow up in 2009.

    Results: All measures of fathers’ alcohol use were significantly and positively associated with risk for substance-related disorders in offspring. The associations were to a large extent explained by other risk factors in childhood. In the fully adjusted model, those with fathers in the highest alcohol consumption quintile still had a 63% higher risk (HR=1.63 CI 1.26–2.12) of substance-related disorders compared to those whose fathers’ reported abstinence. The highest risk was found among offspring to fathers with alcohol-related disorders or that had been apprehended for drunkenness, with a more than two-fold increased risk for substance-related disorders.

    Conclusions: Despite the lower risk found among offspring to fathers with sub-clinical drinking when compared to those with alcohol-related disorders, the former group accounts for a much larger proportion of all cases of substance-related disorders in the population, prompting universal prevention efforts targeting the level of total alcohol consumption in society.

  • 27. Thor, Siri
    et al.
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; The Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs, Sweden.
    Social Inequalities in Harmful Drinking and Alcohol-Related Problems Among Swedish Adolescents2019In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 532-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    The study aims to examine how socio-economic status (SES) among youth is related to binge-drinking and alcohol-related problems using three SES indicators: (i) SES of origin (parental education level), (ii) SES of the school environment (average parental education level at student’s school) and (iii) SES of destination (academic orientation).

    Methods

    Cross-sectional data on upper secondary students (n= 4448) in Sweden. Multilevel logistic and negative binomial regression were used to estimate the relationship between each SES indicator and binge-drinking and alcohol-related problems, respectively.

    Results

    Only SES of destination was significantly associated with binge-drinking, with higher odds for students in vocational programmes (OR= 1.42, 95% CI= 1.13–1.80). For the second outcome, SES of destination (rr=1.25; 95%CI=1.08–1.45) and SES of the school environment (rr=1.19, 95% CI=1.02–1.39) indicated more alcohol-related problems in vocational programmes and in schools with lower-educated parents. After adjustment for drinking patterns, the relationship remained for SES of the school environment, but became non-significant for SES of destination.

    Conclusion

    Our results suggest that the SES gradient among youth is stronger for alcohol-related problems than for harmful drinking. By only focusing on SES differences in harmful alcohol use, researchers may underestimate the social inequalities in adverse alcohol-related outcomes among young people. Our findings also support the notion that the environment young people find themselves in matters for social inequalities in alcohol-related harm.

  • 28. Trolldal, Björn
    et al.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs (CAN), Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Changes in the Price of Alcohol and Effect on Youth Drinking and in Different Socio-Economic Groups2021In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 475-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Many studies have shown that changes in alcohol prices have a significant effect on total sales. However, few studies have focused on youth, particularly in different socioeconomic groups. This study examined the effect of changes in the price of alcohol on consumption levels and binge drinking among 15 to 16 year old students in Sweden, both overall, among boys and girls, as well as within different socioeconomic groups.

    Methods: Data on consumption were retrieved from a representative survey of students aged 15-16, conducted annually between 1989 and 2017. Time series analysis employed an autoregressive integrated moving average model (ARIMA). Two types of price data were used: the official price at the retail stores, and the mean price of the ten cheapest beverages in each category. The mean aggregate annual income per Swedish household was included as a control variable.

    The variable used to measure the socioeconomic status was the proportion of the ninth-grade students at each school, who had at least one parent with an education higher than upper secondary school.

    Results: The students' alcohol consumption levels and binge drinking were not significantly affected by price changes during the study period; this was true both for the group as a whole, and among subgroups of boys or girls or of different socioeconomic status. Results were similar regardless of which type of price data variable was used in the analyses.

    Conclusion: Neither average nor minimum price of alcohol had a significant impact on the development of youth drinking in Sweden during the study period.

1 - 28 of 28
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf