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  • 1. Adermon, Adrian
    et al.
    Lindahl, Mikael
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Dynastic Human Capital, Inequality, and Intergenerational Mobility2021In: The American Economic Review, ISSN 0002-8282, E-ISSN 1944-7981, Vol. 111, no 5, p. 1523-1548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimate long-run intergenerational persistence in human capital using information on outcomes for the extended family: the dynasty. A dataset including the entire Swedish population, linking four generations, allows us to identify parents' siblings and cousins, their spouses, and spouses' siblings. Using various human capital measures, we show that traditional parent-child estimates underestimate long-run intergenerational persistence by at least one-third. By adding outcomes for more distant ancestors, we show that almost all of the persistence is captured by the parental generation. Data on adoptees show that at least one-third of -long-term persistence is attributed to environmental factors.

  • 2. Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Kaijser, Magnus
    Adami, Johanna
    Lundgren, Maria
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    School Performance After Preterm Birth2015In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 106-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An increased risk of poor school performance for children born preterm has been shown in many studies, but whether this increase is attributable to preterm birth per se or to other factors associated with preterm birth has not been resolved. Methods: We used data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register, the Longitudinal Integration Database for Sickness Insurance and Labor Market Study, the Swedish Multigeneration Register, and the National School Register to link records comprising the Swedish birth cohorts from 1974 through 1991. Linear regression was used to assess the association between gestational duration and school performance, both with and without controlling for parental and socioeconomic factors. In a restricted analysis, we compared siblings only with each other. Results: Preterm birth was strongly and negatively correlated with school performance. The distribution of school grades for children born at 31-33 weeks was on average 3.85 (95% confidence interval = -4.36 to -3.35) centiles lower than for children born at 40 weeks. For births at 22-24 weeks, the corresponding figure was -23.15 (-30.32 to -15.97). When taking confounders into account, the association remained. When restricting the analysis to siblings, however, the association between school performance and preterm birth after week 30 vanished completely, whereas it remained, less pronounced, for preterm birth before 30 weeks of gestation. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the association between school performance and preterm birth after 30 gestational weeks is attributable to factors other than preterm birth per se.

  • 3.
    Ahrsjö, ulah0325
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Identity in Court Decision-Making*2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the role of identity along multiple dimensions in high-stakes decisionmaking.Our data contain information about demographic and socioeconomic indicatorsfor randomly assigned jurors and defendants in a Swedish court. Our results showthat defendants are 15 percent less likely to get a prison sentence if they and the jurorsbelong to the same identity-forming groups. Socioeconomic background and demographicattributes are at least as important, and combining several identities producesstronger e ects.

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  • 4. Almond, Douglas
    et al.
    Edlund, Lena
    Joffe, Michael
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    An adaptive significance of morning sickness? Trivers-Willard and Hyperemesis Gravidarum2016In: Economics and Human Biology, ISSN 1570-677X, E-ISSN 1873-6130, Vol. 21, p. 167-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nausea during pregnancy, with or without vomiting, is a common early indication of pregnancy in humans. The severe form, Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG), can be fatal. The aetiology of HG is unknown. We propose that HG may be a proximate mechanism for the Trivers-Willard (T-W) evolutionary hypothesis that mothers in poor condition should favor daughters. Using Swedish linked registry data, 1987-2005, we analyze all pregnancies that resulted in an HG admission and/or a live birth, 1.65 million pregnancies in all. Consistent with the T-W hypothesis, we find that: (i) HG is associated with poor maternal condition as proxied by low education; (ii) HG in the first two months of pregnancy is associated with a 7% point increase in live girl births; and (iii) HG affected pregnancies have a 34-percent average rate of inferred pregnancy loss, higher among less educated women.

  • 5. Almond, Douglas
    et al.
    Edlund, Lena
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Chernobyl's subclinical legacy: prenatal exposure to radioactive fallout and school outcomes in sweden2009In: Quarterly Journal of Economics, ISSN 0033-5533, E-ISSN 1531-4650, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 1729-1772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use prenatal exposure to Chernobyl fallout in Sweden as a natural experiment inducing variation in cognitive ability. Students born in regions of Sweden with higher fallout performed worse in secondary school, in mathematics in particular. Damage is accentuated within families (i.e., siblings comparison) and among children born to parents with low education. In contrast, we detect no corresponding damage to health outcomes. To the extent that parents responded to the cognitive endowment, we infer that parental investments reinforced the initial Chernobyl damage. From a public health perspective, our findings suggest that cognitive ability is compromised at radiation doses currently considered harmless.

  • 6. Benyi, Emelie
    et al.
    Linder, Marie
    Adami, Johanna
    Kieler, Helle
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sävendahl, Lars
    Adult height is associated with risk of cancer and mortality in 5.5 million Swedish women and men2019In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 73, no 8, p. 730-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Previous studies have indicated that taller individuals are at greater risk of developing cancer. Death from cancer and other specific causes have also been linked to height, but the results have been inconclusive. We aimed to shed further light on the associations between height, cancer incidence and mortality.

    Methods We conducted a nationwide, population-based prospective cohort study, including 5.5 million Swedish women and men (aged 20-74). They were followed over a period of up to 54 years. Heights were retrieved from national registers (mainly the Passport Register where heights are most often self-reported). The risks of overall and specific cancers, as well as overall and cause-specific mortality, were presented as HR with 95% CIs per 10 cm increase in height.

    Results A total of 278 299 cases of cancer and 139 393 cases of death were identified. For overall cancer, HR was 1.19 (1.18-1.20) in women and 1.11 (1.10-1.12) in men for every 10 cm increase in height. All 15 specific cancer types were positively associated with height-most strongly for malignant melanoma in both genders, with HRs of 1.39 (1.35-1.43) in women and 1.34 (1.30-1.38) in men. For overall mortality, HR was 0.98 (0.97-0.99) in women and 0.91 (0.90-0.92) in men for every 10 cm increase in height. Cancer mortality was increased in taller individuals, with HR 1.15 (1.13-1.17) in women and 1.05 (1.03-1.07) in men for every 10 cm increase in height, whereas shorter individuals had increased overall mortality due to a number of other causes, such as cardiovascular disease.

    Conclusion Overall and specific cancer risks, particularly malignant melanoma, were positively associated with height. Cancer mortality also increased with height. In contrast, overall mortality was decreased with height, particularly in men due to inverse associations with height for other causes of death.

  • 7. Berglund, Lukas
    et al.
    Liu, Cecilia
    Adami, Johanna
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Qureshi, Abdul Rashid
    Felländer-Tsai, Li
    Decreasing incidence of knee arthroscopy in Sweden between 2002 and 2016: a nationwide register-based study2023In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 94, p. 26-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Several randomized trials have demonstrated the lack of effect of arthroscopic lavage as treatment for knee osteoarthritis (OA). These results have in turn resulted in a change in Swedish guidelines and reimbursement. We aimed to investigate the use of knee arthroscopies in Sweden between 2002 and 2016. Patient demographics, regional differences, and the magnitude of patients with knee OA undergoing knee arthroscopy were also analyzed.

    Patients and methods: Trends in knee arthroscopy were investigated using the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register (SHDR) to conduct a nationwide register-based study including all adults (>18 years of age) undergoing any knee arthroscopy between 2002 and 2016.

    Results: The total number of knee arthroscopies performed during the studied period was 241,055. The annual surgery rate declined in all age groups, for males and females as well as patients with knee OA. The incidence dropped from 247 to 155 per 105 inhabitants. Over 50% of arthroscopies were performed in metropolitan regions.

    Conclusion: We showed a dramatic decline in knee arthroscopy. There is variability in the surgery rate between males and females and among the regions of Sweden.

  • 8.
    Björkegren, Evelina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lindahl, Mikael
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Simeonova, Emilia
    Pre- and Post-Birth Components of Intergenerational Persistence in Health and Longevity: Lessons from a Large Sample of Adoptees2022In: The Journal of human resources, ISSN 0022-166X, E-ISSN 1548-8004, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 112-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use a large sample of Swedish-born adoptees and their biological and adopting parents to decompose the persistence in health inequality across generations into pre-birth and post-birth components. We use three sets of measures for health outcomes in the second generation: mortality, measures based on data on hospitalization, and measures using birth outcomes for the third generation. The results show that all of the persistence in mortality is transmitted solely via pre-birth factors, while the results for the hospitalization measures suggest that at least three-quarters of the intergenerational persistence in health is attributable to the biological parents.

  • 9.
    Boschini, Anne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Muren, Astri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Persson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Vetenskapliga sanningar och feministiska myter2011In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 39, p. 5-13Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I en nyligen publicerad bok presenterar och avfärdar samhällsdebattören Pär Ström vad han betraktar som sex olika "feministiska myter". I denna artikel granskas framställningen. Vi finner att den på en rad punkter vilar på en mycket svag empirisk grund. Pär Ström använder sig av statistik och citat på ett selektivt vis och verkligheten är mer komplicerad än vad han vill ge sken av.

  • 10. Johansson, Per
    et al.
    Laun, Lisa
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Olofsdotter Stensöta, Helena
    Drivkrafter och möjligheter till ett förlängt arbetsliv2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    vi lever allt längre efter att vi slutat arbeta. På senare år har den faktiska ökningen i förväntad livslängd överstigit prognoserna. År 1990 var den förväntade återstående livslängden vid 65 års ål-der 15,3 år för män och 19,0 år för kvinnor. År 2017 hade den ökat med 25 procent för män till 19,1 år och med 13 procent för kvinnor till 21,4 år. Denna ökning ställer allt högre krav på finansieringen av tiden efter det att vi slutat bidra själva till vår försörjning. Ett problem direkt förknippat med den längre tiden efter utträdet från arbetskraften är, genom indexeringen i det nya pensionssystemet, att pensionerna blir låga – vilket på senare tid fått allt större plats i nyhetsförmedlingen och den allmänna debatten.Ett sätt att hantera problemet är att arbeta längre. Det individu-ella beslutet att jobba vidare påverkas av både samhälleliga institu-tioner och arbetsmarknadens inställning till äldre. Faktorer som in-verkar är utsikterna att få förtidspension/sjukersättning, ekonomiska incitament till att arbeta vidare, hälsa, personliga preferenser, möj-ligheter till vidareutbildning och kompetensutveckling, omställning till nya arbetsformer och arbetsmiljö.

  • 11.
    Järliden Bergström, Åsa-Pia
    et al.
    ESO.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Persson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Beskattning av privat pensionssparande2010Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Jönsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Svensson, Ingemar
    Disability Insurance, Population Health, and Employment in Sweden2012In: Social security programs and retirement around the world: historical trends in mortality and health, employment, and disability insurance participation and reforms / [ed] Wise, DA, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012, p. 79-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13. Karlström, Anders
    et al.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Svensson, Ingemar
    Assessing the Welfare Change from a Pension Reform2011In: International Tax and Public Finance, ISSN 0927-5940, E-ISSN 1573-6970, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 634-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the welfare implications of a hypothetical reform of the Swedish public pension system where eligibility to pension benefits is delayed by 3 years. Using an option value model, we consider the labor supply responses to the reform and develop a compensating variation (CV) measure to analytically assess the individual welfare changes in a random utility framework. We find that a purely budgetary calculation (neglecting individual labor supply responses) overestimates the welfare loss by more than 65%. We also develop a method for testing between a binary and a multinomial option value model, where the binary one is nested in the multinomial model in a Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) model framework. The binary model cannot be rejected.

  • 14. Lindahl, Mikael
    et al.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. IZA, Germany.
    Sandgren Massih, Sofia
    Sjögren, Anna
    Long-Term Intergenerational Persistence of Human Capital: An Empirical Analysis of Four Generations2015In: The Journal of human resources, ISSN 0022-166X, E-ISSN 1548-8004, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 1-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most previous studies of intergenerational transmission of human capital are restricted to two generations: how parents influence their children. In this study, we use a Swedish data set that links individual measures of lifetime earnings for three generations and data on educational attainment for four generations. We find that estimates obtained from data on two generations severely underestimate long-run intergenerational persistence in both labor earnings and educational attainments. Long-run social mobility is hence much lower than previously thought. We attribute this additional persistence to dynastic human capital-the influence on human capital of more distant family members than parents.

  • 15. Lindahl, Mikael
    et al.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sandgren Massih, Sofia
    Sjögren, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The intergenerational persistence of human capital: an empirical analysis of four generations2012Report (Refereed)
  • 16. Lindahl, Mikael
    et al.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Institute for the Study of Labor, IZA, Germany .
    Sandgren-Massih, Sofia
    Sjögren, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Uppsala Center for Labor Studies, Sweden.
    A Test of the Becker-Tomes Model of Human Capital Transmission Using Microdata on Four Generations2014In: Journal of Human Capital, ISSN 1932-8575, E-ISSN 1932-8664, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 80-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimate the well-known Becker-Tomes model of intergenerational transmission of human capital. A Swedish data set, which links individual measures on educational attainments of four generations, enables us to use great-grandparents' education as an instrumental variable. The identifying assumption, which holds within the Becker-Tomes framework, is that great-grandparents' education is unrelated to great-grandchildren's education, conditional on the education of the parent and grandparent. We test the model's prediction that the structural parameter for grandparents' education enters with a negative sign in an intergenerational regression model.

  • 17. Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. IZA, Bonn, Germany.
    Persson, Mats
    Sickness Absence and Local Benefit Cultures2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 118, no 1, p. 49-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries, sickness absence financed by generous insurance benefits is an important concern in the policy debate. There are strong variations in absence behavior among local geographical areas. Such variations are difficult to explain in terms of observable socioeconomic factors. In this paper, we investigate whether such variations are related to group effects in the form of social interaction among individuals within neighborhoods. Well-known methodological problems arise when trying to answer this question. A special feature of our efforts to deal with these problems is that we adopt several alternative approaches to identify group effects. Our study is based on a rich set of Swedish panel data, and we find indications of group effects in each of our approaches.

  • 18. Marcano, Alejandro I.
    et al.
    Nordenvall, Richard
    Karlsson, Pär
    Gerdin, Martin
    Adami, Johanna
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Mattila, Ville M.
    Bahmanyar, Shahram
    Felländer-Tsai, Li
    Income change after cruciate ligament injury - A population-based study2019In: Knee (Oxford), ISSN 0968-0160, E-ISSN 1873-5800, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 603-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the association between choice of treatment and patients' income after cruciate ligament (CL) injury and assess the effect of different covariates such as sex, age, comorbidities and type of work.

    Methods: This entire-population cohort study in Sweden included working patients with a diagnosed CL injury between 2002 and 2005, identified in The National Swedish Patient Register (n = 13,662). The exposure was the treatment choice (operative or non-operative treatment). The main outcome measure was average yearly income five years after CL diagnosis, adjusted for the following covariates: sex, age, comorbidities, type of work, region, calendar year, education and income.

    Results: Relative to non-operative treatment, operative treatment was associated with greater average yearly incomes (nine to 15%) after injury among patients between 20 and 50 years, patients with partial university education, patients living in large cities and patients with one comorbidity, despite no overall significant association in the national cohort. Delayed operative treatment (>1 year) had no significant association with income change, whereas early operative treatment (<1 year) was associated with higher average yearly incomes (11 to 16%) among females, patients between 20 and 50 years, patients living in large cities and patients with one comorbidity.

    Conclusions: In a broad sense, treatment choice was not associated with changes in income five years after CL injuries among patients in the workforce, however earlier operative treatment was associated with higher average incomes among patients with ages between 20 and 50, females, living in large cities, with one comorbidity and with a high level of education.

  • 19. Meghir, Costas
    et al.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Simeonova, Emilia
    Education and Mortality: Evidence from a Social Experiment2018In: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, ISSN 1945-7782, E-ISSN 1945-7790, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 234-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the effects on mortality and health due to a major Swedish educationol reform that increased the years of compulsory schooling. Using the gradual phase-in of the reform between 1949 and 1962 across municipalities, we estimate insignificant effects of the reform on mortality in the affected cohort. From the confidence intervals, we con rule out effects' larger than 1-1.4 months of increased life expectancy. We find no significant impacts on mortality for individuals of low socioeconomic status backgrounds, on deaths that are more likely to be affected by behavior, on hospitalizations, and consumption of prescribed drugs.

  • 20. Nordenskjöld, A. C.
    et al.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Kaijser, M.
    X-ray exposure in utero and school performance: a population-based study of X-ray pelvimetry2015In: Clinical Radiology, ISSN 0009-9260, E-ISSN 1365-229X, Vol. 70, no 8, p. 830-834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate the association between exposure to ionising radiation from pelvimetric examinations in utero and school performance. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a population-based cohort study comprising 46,066 children born in the county of Ostergotland, Sweden, from 1980 through 1990. Through record linkage between Swedish registers, children exposed in utero to X-ray pelvimetry examination were compared to other children born in the same county during the study period, as well as to their unexposed siblings. Outcome variable was primary school grades, expressed in centiles and calculated through linear regression. RESULTS: In the univariate analysis, children exposed to X-ray pelvimetry in utero had higher school grades compared to unexposed children (point estimate 3 centiles, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5 to 4.6). When sex, mother's education and income, birth order, and birth position were included in the analysis; however, the difference was reduced and the association was no longer statistically significant (PE 1.4, 95% CI: -0.1 to 2.8). Comparing exposed children with their siblings showed no statistical difference in univariate analysis or in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: No suggestion was found of a negative effect on school performance from in utero exposure of diagnostic X-ray pelvimetry.

  • 21. Nordenvall, Richard
    et al.
    Marcano, Alejandro I.
    Adami, Johanna
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Mattila, Ville M.
    Bahmanyar, Shahram
    Felländer-Tsai, Li
    The Effect of Socioeconomic Status on the Choice of Treatment for Patients With Cruciate Ligament Injuries in the Knee: A Population-Based Cohort Study2017In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 535-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    The socioeconomic status (SES) of patients has been widely recognized as playing an important role in many health-related conditions, including orthopaedic conditions, in which a higher SES has been associated with a higher utilization of more advanced medical treatments such as drugs, diagnostics, and surgery. However, the association between SES and cruciate ligament surgery has not been thoroughly investigated.

    Purpose:

    To evaluate the association between SES and choice of treatment in patients with a cruciate ligament injury.

    Study Design:

    Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.

    Methods:

    All Swedish patients with a diagnosed cruciate ligament injury between 1987 and 2010 were identified from the Swedish National Patient Register (N = 98,349). The Longitudinal Integration Database for Health Insurance and Labor Market Studies (LISA) provided information on household income and highest achieved educational level, which were used as socioeconomic indices. The exposure was the SES of patients as determined by the household income and educational level, and the main outcome measure was treatment choice (surgical reconstruction vs nonoperative treatment). Poisson regression models estimated the association.

    Results:

    A total of 52,566 patients were included in the study; of these, 20,660 (39%) were treated operatively. Patients in the highest quartile of household income had a significantly higher likelihood of undergoing surgery than those in the lowest quartile (relative risk [RR], 1.16; 95% CI, 1.11-1.20). Patients classified as highly educated had a significantly increased likelihood of being treated operatively compared with those with a low education (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.19-1.39).

    Conclusion:

    This study provides a population-based validation that having a higher SES as determined by the household income and/or level of education increases the likelihood of undergoing operative treatment after a cruciate ligament injury.

    Clinical Relevance:

    All Swedish citizens are entitled by law to the same quality of health care; therefore, unmotivated differences in treatment between different socioeconomic groups are to be seen as a challenge. It is important to evaluate the specific mechanisms by which the patient's SES influences the decision of whether to treat a cruciate ligament injury operatively.

  • 22.
    Palme, Mårten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Jönsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Svensson, Ingemar
    Påverkar folkhälsan utnyttjandet av sjukersättningen?2011In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 56-68Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Palme, Mårten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Karlström, Anders
    Svensson, Ingemar
    The Employment Effect of Stricter Rules for Eligibility to DI: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Sweden2008In: Journal of Public EconomicsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Palme, Mårten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lindahl, Mikael
    Sandgren Massih, Sofia
    Sjögren, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Intergenerationell rörlighet i inkomster och utbildning: en analys av fyra generationer2012Report (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Palme, Mårten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Persson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    SICK PAY INSURANCE AND SICKNESS ABSENCE: SOME EUROPEAN CROSS-COUNTRY OBSERVATIONS AND A REVIEW OF PREVIOUS RESEARCH2020In: Journal of Economic Surveys, ISSN 0950-0804, E-ISSN 1467-6419, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 85-108Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All European countries have some form of compulsory insurance against the loss of income due to temporary disability. The insurance schemes vary widely between countries both in terms of measurable entities (such as the compensation level) as well as in unmeasurable traits concerning the actual implementation of the programs. In this paper we use European Labour Force Survey data to study how the measurable differences in the programs is associated with differences in absence rates. We also summarize the theoretical literature on insurance principles in this field. Based on the empirical literature we then discuss how different forms of incentives may affect the work absence rate.

  • 26.
    Palme, Mårten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sandgren, Sofia
    Parental Income, Lifetime Income and Mortality2008In: Journal of the European Economic AssociationArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Palme, Mårten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Simeonova, Emilia
    Does women's education affect breast cancer risk and survival? Evidence from a population based social experiment in education2015In: Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 0167-6296, E-ISSN 1879-1646, Vol. 42, p. 115-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast cancer is a notable exception to the well documented positive education gradient in health. A number of studies have found that highly educated women are more likely to be diagnosed with the disease. Breast cancer is therefore often labeled as a welfare disease. However, it has not been established whether the strong positive correlation holds up when education is exogenously determined. We estimate the causal effect of education on the probability of being diagnosed with breast cancer by exploiting an education reform that extended compulsory schooling and was implemented as a social experiment. We find that the incidence of breast cancer increased for those exposed to the reform.

  • 28.
    Palme, Mårten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sundén, Annika
    The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Söderlind, Paul
    How Do Individual Accounts Work in the Swedish Pension System?2007In: Journal of the European Economic Association, Vol. 5, no 2-3, p. 636-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1998, Sweden introduced a second tier of mandatory individual accounts in the public pension system. This paper examines investment choice in the Swedish individual account scheme focusing on two aspects of the investment decision: Do workers with high risk in their human capital diversify their overall portfolio by investing their pension funds in low-risk funds? And to what extent do participants exhibit “home bias” and invest in Swedish assets? Two pieces of evidence support rational investment decisions. First, we establish a positive relationship between income and the level of risk. Second, married participants appear to pool their risks. On the other hand, the results show that participants at the bottom of the income distribution take on as much risk as those at the top, indicating that they are not diversifying their overall portfolio. Finally, participants employed in sectors that are affected by foreign competition are less likely to diversify their portfolios and invest in foreign assets compared to the public sector. Instead, these workers exhibit “home bias” in their investments. (JEL: G11, H55)

  • 29.
    Palme, Mårten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sundén, Annika
    Söderlind, Paul
    Investment Choice in the Swedish Premium Pension Plan2007In: Journal of the European Economic Association Papers and Proceedings, Vol. 5, p. 636-646Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Priks, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Hur påverkar strängare straff risken för kriminalitet och andra utfall?2022In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 50, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 30 of 30
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