Change search
Refine search result
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Alm, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Olsson, Gabriella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Future orientation, gambling and risk gambling among youth: a study of adolescents in Stockholm2020In: International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, ISSN 0267-3843, E-ISSN 2164-4527, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 52-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between adolescents’ future orientation and their engagement in gambling and in risk gambling, respectively. The data used come from the Stockholm School Survey, collected in 2016 among students in the ninth grade in elementary school (15–16 years) and in the second grade of upper secondary school (17–18 years) in Stockholm municipality (n = 11,661). The results showed that adolescents who expected their future to be ‘much worse’ than that of others were more inclined to engage in gambling and in risk gambling compared with adolescents who expected their future to be similar to that of others. Furthermore, adolescents who expected their future to be ‘much better’ than that of others had an increased likelihood of engaging in gambling but not in risk gambling. The results are discussed in the light of elements from rational choice theory.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Olsson, Gabriella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    School ethos and adolescent gambling: a multilevel study of upper secondary schools in Stockholm, Sweden2020In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gambling is not uncommon among adolescents, and a non-trivial minority has serious problems with gambling. Therefore, enhanced knowledge about factors that may prevent against problematic gambling among youth is needed. Prior research has shown that a strong school ethos, which can be defined as a set of attitudes and values pervading at a school, is associated with a lower inclination among students to engage in various risk behaviours. Knowledge about the link between school ethos and adolescent gambling is however scarce. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between teacher-rated school ethos and student-reported gambling and risk gambling, when controlling also for sociodemographic characteristics at the student- and the school-level.

    Methods: Data from two separate cross-sectional surveys were combined. The Stockholm School Survey (SSS) was performed among 5123 students (aged 17–18years) in 46 upper secondary schools, and the Stockholm Teacher Survey (STS) was carried out among 1061 teachers in the same schools. School ethos was measured by an index based on teachers’ ratings of 12 items in the STS. Adolescent gambling and risk gambling were based on a set of single items in the SSS. Sociodemographic characteristics at the student-level were measured by student-reported information from the SSS. Information on sociodemographic characteristics at the school-level was retrieved from administrative registers. The statistical method was multilevel regression analysis. Two-level binary logistic regression models were performed.

    Results: The analyses showed that higher teacher ratings of the school’s ethos were associated with a lower likelihood of gambling and risk gambling among students, when adjusting also for student- and school-level sociodemographic characteristics.

    Conclusions: This study showed that school ethos was inversely associated with students’ inclination to engage in gambling and in risk gambling. In more general terms, the study provides evidence that schools’ values and norms as reflected by the teachers’ ratings of their school’s ethos have the potential to counteract unwanted behaviours among the students.

  • 3.
    Elling, Devy L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Brännström Almquist, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Effects of a multi-component alcohol prevention program in the workplace on hazardous alcohol use among employees2023In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, article id 1420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The workplace can be affected negatively by hazardous alcohol use, and intervening at an early stage remains a challenge. Recently, a multi-component alcohol prevention program, Alcohol Policy and Managers’ skills Training (hereafter, ‘APMaT’), was delivered at the organizational level. In a previous outcome evaluation, APMaT appeared to be effective at the managerial level. The current study takes a step further by aiming to evaluate the effectiveness of APMaT in decreasing the alcohol risk level among employees.

    Methods: Data from 853 employees (control: n = 586; intervention: n = 267) were gathered through a cluster-randomized study. To analyze changes in the odds of hazardous alcohol use among employees, multilevel logistic regression was applied using group (control vs. intervention), time (baseline vs. 12-month follow-up), and the multiplicative interaction term (group × time) as the main predictors. The intervention effect was further adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and policy awareness.

    Results: No statistically significant difference was observed in the odds of hazardous alcohol use, although employees in the intervention group showed a larger decrease compared to the control group. This remained even after adjusting for several factors, including the sociodemographic factors and policy awareness.

    Conclusions: The findings are insufficient to determine the effectiveness of APMaT at the employee level at the current stage of the evaluation. Future studies should strive to identify issues with implementation processes in workplace-based alcohol interventions.

  • 4.
    Elling, Devy L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Brännström Almquist, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Effects of a multi-component alcohol prevention programme in the workplace on hazardous alcohol use among employeesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The workplace can be affected negatively by hazardous alcohol use, and intervening at an early stage remains a challenge. Recently, a multi-component alcohol prevention program, Alcohol Policy and Managers’ skills Training (hereafter, ‘APMaT’), was delivered at the organizational level. In a previous outcome evaluation, APMaT appeared to be effective at the managerial level. The current study takes a step further by aiming to evaluate the effectiveness of APMaT in decreasing the alcohol risk level among employees.

    Methods: Data from 853 employees (control: n = 586; intervention: n = 267) were gathered through a cluster-randomized study. To analyze changes in the odds of hazardous alcohol use among employees, multilevel logistic regression was applied using group (control vs intervention), time (baseline vs 12-month follow-up), and the multiplicative interaction term (group × time) as the main predictors. The intervention effect was further adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and policy awareness.

    Results: Employees in the intervention group showed a larger decrease in the odds of hazardous alcohol use compared to the control group. However, this difference was not statistically significant, even after adjusting for several factors, including the sociodemographic factors and policy awareness.

    Conclusions: The findings are insufficient to determine the effectiveness of APMaT at the employee level at the current stage of the evaluation. Future studies should strive to identify issues with implementation processes in workplace-based alcohol interventions. 

    Trial registration: ISCRTN: ISRCTN17250048.

  • 5.
    Elling, Devy L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Brännström Almquist, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sverige.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.
    Evaluation of a workplace alcohol prevention program targeted on managers’ inclination to initiate early alcohol interventions2022In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 517-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol interventions targeting the adult population are often conducted in healthcare settings, while preventive interventions often target adolescents or young adults. The general working population is often overlooked. A workplace-based intervention, consisting of development and implementation of an organizational alcohol policy, and skills development training for managers (APMaT) was carried out in order to prevent and reduce alcohol-related harms by identifying hazardous consumers at an early stage. 

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate APMaT by focusing on managers’ inclination to initiate early alcohol intervention.

    Methods: In a cluster randomized design, data were obtained from 187 managers (control: n = 70; intervention: n = 117). Inclination to initiate early alcohol intervention was measured using three items on a 5-point Likert scale ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree). Changes in managers’ inclination to intervene were analyzed by applying multilevel ordered logistic regression. Predictors included in the model were group (control vs. intervention), time (baseline vs. 12-month follow-up), and the multiplicative interaction term (group × time).

    Results: Significant increase in inclination to intervene against hazardous alcohol consumption among managers in the intervention group compared to managers in the control group was observed. Specifically, a 50% increase of confidence to initiate an intervention was observed among managers in the intervention group.

    Conclusions: APMaT seems effective to increase managers’ inclination to intervene early against hazardous consumption in the workplace. The effectiveness of APMaT at the employee level should be explored in prospective studies.

  • 6.
    Elling, Devy L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Martinez, Martina Wilson
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Perceived barriers in the dissemination of an organisational alcohol policy as part of implementing an alcohol prevention programme among managers2022In: Drugs, Habits and Social Policy, ISSN 2752-6739, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 128-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - An alcohol prevention programme, consisting of the implementation of an organisational alcohol policy and skills development training for managers, was delivered in Swedish workplaces. Previous findings revealed challenges in policy implementation because of the lack of dissemination amongst managers. This study aims to describe perceived dissemination barriers of the organisational alcohol policy by managers. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional survey (n = 193 managers) was performed to identify common dissemination barriers in the workplace and complementary case illustrations derived from semi-structured interviews (n = 18 managers) were used to understand the dissemination barriers of the organisational alcohol policy. Frequency distributions were presented to describe common perceived barriers. Findings - Sixty-five per cent of managers reported that their workplace had not changed their approach to addressing alcohol-related issues compared to their usual practice before programme delivery. Various organisational factors, such as deprioritisation of programme dissemination, lack of communication and inadequate strategies were some of the common barriers perceived by managers. Moreover, managers reported uncertainties regarding any changes concerning the workplace's approach for addressing alcohol-related issues. Increased efforts in disseminating the organisational alcohol policy can reduce uncertainties among managers. Practical implications - A thorough process evaluation to understand processes in programme delivery and implementation is necessary to ensure the uptake of the intervention. Originality/value - This study highlighted the complexity of disseminating an alcohol policy in a dynamic setting, such as the workplace, and provided the importance of addressing organisational obstacles.

  • 7.
    Elling, Devy L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Martinez, Martina Wilson
    University of Gothenburg.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Perceived barriers in the dissemination of and organisational alcohol policy as a part of implementing an alcohol prevention programme among managersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: An alcohol prevention programme, consisting of the implementation of an organisational alcohol policy and skills development training for managers, was delivered in Swedish workplaces. Previous findings revealed challenges in policy implementation due to the lack of dissemination amongst managers. This study aims to describe perceived dissemination barriers of the organisational alcohol policy by managers.

    Methodology: A cross-sectional survey (n=193 managers) was performed to identify common dissemination barriers in the workplace and complementary case illustrations derived from semi-structured interviews (n=18 managers) were used to understand the dissemination barriers of the organisational alcohol policy. Frequency distributions were presented to describe common perceived barriers.

    Findings: Sixty-five percent of managers reported that their workplace had not changed their approach to addressing alcohol-related issues compared to their usual practice before programme delivery. Various organisational factors, such as deprioritisation of programme dissemination, lack of communication, and inadequate strategies were some of the common barriers perceived by managers. Moreover, managers reported uncertainties regarding any changes concerning the workplace’s approach for addressing alcohol-related issues. Increased efforts in disseminating the organisational alcohol policy can reduce uncertainties among managers. 

    Practical implications: A thorough process evaluation to understand processes in programme delivery and implementation is necessary to ensure the uptake of the intervention. 

    Originality/value: The study highlighted the complexity of disseminating an alcohol policy in a dynamic setting, such as the workplace, and provided the importance of addressing organisational obstacles.

  • 8.
    Elling, Devy L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    B. Almquist, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Workplace alcohol prevention: are managers' individual characteristics associated with organisational alcohol policy knowledge and inclination to initiate early alcohol interventions?2020In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 543-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Individual factors associated with managers' organisational alcohol policy knowledge and inclination to initiate early alcohol interventions have been understudied. This study aims to examine differences in managers' policy knowledge and inclination across a range of socio-demographic, work-related and health characteristics, and it aims to examine the association between policy knowledge and inclination to intervene, net of these characteristics.

    Design/methodology/approach - Questionnaire data were collected from 430 managers. Organisational alcohol policy knowledge and inclination to intervene were measured using a 5-point Likert scale ranging from 1 (very low) to 5 (very high). Socio-demographic, work-related and health characteristics included gender, age, education, managerial responsibility, years in current position, self-rated health and alcohol consumption. Associations were examined using multilevel ordinal regression analysis.

    Findings - Managers with a greater number of employees demonstrated the highest level of organisational alcohol policy knowledge and were more inclined to initiate early alcohol interventions. Alcohol policy knowledge was associated with inclination to intervene, net of individual characteristics.

    Practical implications - Considering how managers' characteristics might influence efforts to decrease hazardous alcohol consumption is potentially important when designing future workplace alcohol prevention programmes.

    Originality/value - Several individual factors related to managers' organisational alcohol policy knowledge and inclination to initiate early alcohol interventions were identified, particularly managerial responsibility. However, the association between policy knowledge and inclination to intervene remained strong after accounting for these individual factors. Future studies should explore alternative explanations at the individual and organisational levels.

  • 9.
    Elling, Devy Lysandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Wilson, Martina
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Effectiveness of Combining Organizational Alcohol Policy and Skills Training for Managers to Reduce Hazardous Alcohol Consumption in Swedish Workplaces: Study Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Study2020In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 9, no 8, article id e17145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High alcohol consumption poses risks to individual health and society. Previous alcohol interventions have mainly focused on high-risk consumers or young adults in school-based settings. Since the majority of the adult population is in the workforce, the workplace can be considered a favorable arena for implementing interventions.

    Objective: This protocol describes a project aimed at increasing knowledge of the effectiveness of combining the implementation of an organizational alcohol policy with skills training for managers as a workplace alcohol prevention program, by evaluating the intervention and exploring managers’ perceptions of the intervention.

    Methods: Organizations with at least 100 employees were invited to take part in the project. A total of 11 organizations (744 managers and 11,761 employees) were included in the project. Data are collected through self-administered online surveys at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months. The primary outcome is managers’ inclination to initiate an early alcohol intervention (eg, by initiating a dialogue) when concern regarding employees’ hazardous alcohol consumption arises. The secondary outcomes of interest are managers’ and employees’ organizational alcohol policy knowledge and changes in alcohol consumption, as measured using the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) score. A linear mixed-model framework will be used to model variability on different levels. Primary analysis will follow an intention-to-treat approach. Additionally, managers’ responses from semistructured interviews will be analyzed using thematic analysis to explore managers’ experiences regarding the prevention program.

    Results: This study is ongoing. The overall study start was on January 2018, and the study is planned to end in December 2020. Baseline and 12-month follow-up measurements have been collected.

    Conclusions: This project is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of an alcohol prevention program regarding higher inclination to initiate early alcohol interventions after policy implementation and skills training among managers, compared to the usual practices in the workplace. The results from this study can contribute to increased knowledge about alcohol interventions and future prevention programs in the workplace.

    Trial Registration: ISRCTN17250048; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN17250048

    International Registered Report Identifier (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/17145

  • 10.
    Forsström, David
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Rozental, Alexander
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Alcohol Use and Gambling Associated with Impulsivity among a Swedish University Sample2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 4, article id 2436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excessive alcohol use and gambling can have negative consequences. Across countries, the risk of excessive alcohol use is more common in university populations than in the general population. However, few studies have investigated the prevalence of both alcohol use and gambling in this group. This study explores these behaviours in a Swedish university setting. In addition, this study investigates how impulsivity affects alcohol use and gambling. In total, 794 Swedish students answered an online survey. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics to determine prevalence, and multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the contribution of impulsivity, age, and sex to alcohol use and gambling. Compared to the Swedish national prevalence, the prevalence was higher for excessive alcohol use, but the prevalence of gambling was at the same level or lower. High levels of impulsivity and male sex increased the risk of excessive alcohol use, while older age lowered the risk of excessive alcohol use and gambling. The results indicate that primarily young men could benefit from primary prevention in a university setting. Also, screening for impulsivity in men might be one way to identify risk groups in a university population.

  • 11. Forsström, David
    et al.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Spångberg, Jessika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Feasibility and results of a pilot online survey to examine prevalence of gambling and problem gambling among Swedish substance abuse inpatients in compulsory care2024In: Cogent Psychology, E-ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 2305543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The comorbidity between problem gambling and substance use/abuse is high in many populations previously studied. However, the occurrence of problem gambling among individuals with substance abuse has not been thoroughly studied, which is especially true for individuals in inpatient or compulsory care. The present early-stage study explored the presence of gambling and problem gambling among inpatients in compulsory care in Sweden who has been court-ordered to treatment for their substance abuse (alcohol and/or drugs). The study furthermore investigates the use of preventive measures and treatment seeking. The most effective strategy to recruit participants (no incentive, incentive and incentive and face-to-face recruitment) was also explored. Twenty-one participants were recruited and seven of them had at-risk or problem gambling and none of them had accessed treatment. The best way of recruiting was to offer a gift certificate and inform about the study face-to-face. The implications are that individuals in compulsory care for substance abuse need to be screened for problem gambling, that recruitment for studies in this population is best carried out by offering incentives and educational efforts and that it might be beneficial for the clients in compulsory care to be offered gambling treatment. 

  • 12.
    Forsström, David
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Sundström, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Problematic Alcohol Use in a Workplace Setting: Protocol for Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation of Feasibility and Outcomes2020In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 9, no 7, article id e18693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) for mental health issues has been successfully implemented in routine health care settings, and research indicates that ICBT can also be applied to decrease problematic alcohol use in workplace settings. However, studies investigating the feasibility of implementing ICBT in a workplace setting have been lacking.

    Objective: The current study aims to investigate the feasibility of delivering ICBT for problematic alcohol use within an employee assistance program (EAP).

    Methods: The study has a quantitative naturalistic design, quantitively comparing ICBT and face-to-face treatment, and allowing for qualitative interviews with employees and employers. Recruitment of participants follows a five-session in-person psychological assessment at an EAP regarding an employee's presumed problematic alcohol consumption. All assessed employees referred to ICBT or face-to-face treatment will be offered participation in the study. Interviews will be held with employees and their employer representatives following ICBT to elucidate both stakeholders' experience and perception of ICBT and its context. Outcome comparisons between ICBT and face-to-face treatment will be assessed quantitatively using a Reliable Change Index and analysis of variance. Thematic analysis and Grounded Theory will be used to analyze the interview material.

    Results: The study is set to begin in April 2020 and to end in September 2021. The aim is to recruit up to 150 participants to the quantitative part of the study and 45 participants (15 employees and 30 employer representatives) to the qualitative part of the study.

    Conclusions: The current study will provide knowledge that is lacking and urgently needed on how to implement ICBT for problematic alcohol use in a workplace setting.

  • 13. Molander, Olof
    et al.
    Volberg, Rachel
    Månsson, Viktor
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm Region Health Services, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Development of the Gambling Disorder Identification Test: Results from an international Delphi and consensus process2021In: International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, ISSN 1049-8931, E-ISSN 1557-0657, Vol. 30, no 2, article id e1865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Diverse instruments are used to measure problem gambling and Gambling Disorder intervention outcomes. The 2004 Banff consensus agreement proposed necessary features for reporting gambling treatment efficacy. To address the challenge of including these features in a single instrument, a process was initiated to develop the Gambling Disorder Identification Test (GDIT), as an instrument analogous to the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test.

    Methods: Gambling experts from 10 countries participated in an international two-round Delphi (n = 61; n = 30), rating 30 items proposed for inclusion in the GDIT. Gambling researchers and clinicians from several countries participated in three consensus meetings (n = 10; n = 4; n = 3). User feedback was obtained from individuals with experience of problem gambling (n = 12) and from treatment-seekers with Gambling Disorder (n = 8).

    Results: Ten items fulfilled Delphi consensus criteria for inclusion in the GDIT (M >= 7 on a scale of 1-9 in the second round). Item-related issues were addressed, and four more items were added to conform to the Banff agreement recommendations, yielding a final draft version of the GDIT with 14 items in three domains: gambling behavior, gambling symptoms and negative consequences.

    Conclusions: This study established preliminary construct and face validity for the GDIT.

  • 14. Molander, Olof
    et al.
    Volberg, Rachel
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Månsson, Viktor
    Berman, Anne H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Sweden; Stockholm Center for Dependency Disorders, Sweden.
    Development of the Gambling Disorder Identification Test (G-DIT): Protocol for a Delphi Method Study2019In: JMIR Research Protocols, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 8, no 1, article id e12006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research on the identification and treatment of problem gambling has been characterized by a wide range of outcome measures and instruments. However, a single instrument measuring gambling behavior, severity, and specific deleterious effects is lacking. Objective: This protocol describes the development of the Gambling Disorder Identification Test (G-DIT), which is a 9-to 12-item multiple-choice scale with three domains: gambling consumption, symptom severity, and negative consequences. The scale is analogous to the widely used Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and the Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT). Methods: The G-DIT is developed in four steps: (1) identification of items eligible for the G-DIT from a pool of existing gambling measures; (2) presentation of items proposed for evaluation by invited expert researchers through an online Delphi process and subsequent consensus meetings; (3) pilot testing of a draft of the 9- to 12-item version in a small group of participants with problem gambling behavior (n= 12); and (4) evaluation of the psychometric properties of the final G-DIT measure in relation to the existing instruments and self-reported criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5), among individuals with problem gambling and nonproblematic recreational gambling behaviors (n= 600). This protocol article summarizes step 1 and describes steps 2 and 3 in detail. Results: As of October 2018, steps 1-3 are complete, and step 4 is underway. Conclusions: Implementation of this online Delphi study early in the psychometric development process will contribute to the face and construct validity of the G-DIT. We believe the G-DIT will be useful as a standard outcome measure in the field of problem gambling research and serve as a problem-identification tool in clinical settings.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Kristina, Sundqvist
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Det svårfångade problemspelandet – spelares subjektiva tolkningar av Swelogs bedömningsinstrument2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Överdrivet spelande om pengar kan få ekonomiska, känslomässiga och sociala konsekvenser i olika grad. Hur spelare själva upplever bekymren är centralt för huruvida de kommer att försöka förändra sina spelvanor. Men vad är det egentligen vi fångar när vi mäter problemspelande i befolkningen? Vi har undersökt hur spelare som tidigare bedömts ha ett problemspelande tolkar frågorna som användes vid just denna bedömning.

  • 16.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Binde, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Configurations of gambling change and harm: qualitative findings from the Swedish longitudinal gambling study (Swelogs)2018In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1606-6359, E-ISSN 1476-7392, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 514-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gambling participation and problems change over time and are influenced by a variety of individual and contextual factors. However, gambling research has only to a small extent studied gamblers’ own perceptions of transitions in and out of problem gambling.Method: Qualitative telephone interviews were made with 40 gamblers who had repeatedly participated in the Swelogs Swedish Longitudinal Gambling Study. The framework approach was used for analyses, resulting in a multiple-linkage typology.Results: Our analyses revealed four configurations of gambling: (a) stable low frequency with no or minor harm, (b) decreasing high frequency with occasional harm, (c) fluctuating with moderate harm, and (d) increasing high frequency with substantial harm. Natural recovery and return to previous levels of gambling intensity were common. Change occurred either gradually, as a result of adjustment to altered personal circumstances, or drastically as a consequence of determined decisions to change. Personal and contextual factors such as psychological well-being, supportive relationships, and meaningful leisure activities played a part in overcoming harmful gambling and keeping gambling on a non-problematic level. Gambling advertising was commonly perceived as aggressive and triggering.Conclusions: The experience of harm is highly subjective, which should be taken into account when developing preventive measures. Considering the fluid character of gambling problems, help and support should be easily accessible and diversified. To repeatedly be interviewed about gambling and its consequences can contribute to increased reflection on, and awareness of, one’s own behaviours and the societal impacts of gambling.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Spelares upplevelser av förändringar i vanor och problem. En kvalitativ studie om spel om pengar2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gambling habits and problems change over time and are influenced by a variety of factors. To deepen our understanding of change processes related to gambling habits and problems, qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with 40 gamblers who previously participated in the Swedish longitudinal gambling study, Swelogs. The results showed that factors on individual, relational and societal levels were influential for the gambling trajectories. Factors such as personality, well-being, perceptions of gambling, access to money, employment, family life, live events, maturation, advertising, and accessibility, interact and has to be considered within their contexts. Four typical cases were identified representing various levels of risk and change trajectories. Situations associated with increased gambling were peer-gambling and binge drinking in the 20s, becoming of legal age to gamble, high amount wins, itinerant work situations, negative life events, depression, loneliness, and lack of satisfactory employment. Psychological well-being, supportive relationships and meaningful activities were crucial for overcoming destructive gambling habits or keeping the gambling on a non-problematic level. The aggressive character of advertising was perceived as problematic, and restrictions were advocated. The interviewed believed that their participation in a longitudinal study about gambling could have contributed to increased reflection and awareness of own behaviours and gambling problems overall in society.

  • 18.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Gamblers’ (mis-)interpretations of Problem Gambling Severity Index items: Ambiguities in qualitative accounts from the Swedish Longitudinal Gambling Study2019In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 140-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) is a screening instrument frequently used to identify risk and problem gambling. Even though the PGSI has good psychometric properties, it still produces a large proportion of misclassifications. Aims: To explore possible reasons for misclassifications in problem gambling level by analysing previously classified moderate-risk gamblers’ answers to the PGSI items, in relation to their own current and past gambling behaviours. Methods: Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 19 participants reporting no negative consequences from gambling. They were asked the PGSI questions within an eight-year time frame (2008 to 2016). Ambiguous answers to PGSI items were subject to content analysis. Results: Several answers to the PGSI items contained ambiguities and misinterpretations, making it difficult to assess to what extent their answers actually indicated any problematic gambling over time. The item about feelings of guilt generated accounts rather reflecting self-recrimination over wasting money or regretting gambling as a meaningless or immoral activity. The item concerning critique involved mild interpretations such as being ridiculed for buying lottery tickets or getting comments for being boring. Similar accounts were given by the participants irrespective of initial endorsement of the items. Other possible reasons for misclassifications were related to recall bias, language difficulties, selective memory, and a tendency to answer one part of the question without taking the whole question into account. Conclusions: Answers to the PGSI can contain a variety of meanings based on the respondents’ subjective interpretations. Reports of lower levels of harm in the population should thus be interpreted with caution. In clinical settings it is important to combine use of screening instruments with interviews, to be able to better understand gamblers’ perceptions of the gambling behaviour and its negative consequences.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Beyond Recreational Gambling: a Psychological Perspective on Risk- and Problem Gambling2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The general aim of this thesis was to examine risk gambling in the general population from a psychological perspective. This was done in three studies targeting personality, risky alcohol habits and gambling motives, respectively. Initially, 19 530 randomly assigned Swedish citizens were screened for problem gambling via telephone using the two questions in the Lie/Bet questionnaire. This sample constitutes the basis for one of the studies in the thesis. For the other studies, individuals answering yes to one of the questions in the Lie/Bet questionnaire and agreeing to participate further were sent a postal questionnaire. The questionnaire included questions about gambling, personality and gambling motives.

     

    Some of the main results showed that:

    • Negative consequences of gambling were associated with higher levels of impulsivity and negative affectivity.
    • Risk gamblers reported lower levels of negative affectivity compared to the general population.
    • Compared to non-risk gamblers, twice as many of the risk gamblers reported weekly binge drinking during the past 12 months. This association, however, seemed to be explained by shared demographic characteristics, rather than by the risk gambling causing binge drinking.
    • High risk gamblers more often reported that they gambled for the challenge and for coping reasons, compared to low risk gamblers.
    • High risk gamblers had overall stronger motives for gambling.
    • The results also indicated that the level of risk gambling was highly intertwined with gambling motives and could explain some differences in gambling motives between, for example, women/men and younger/older gamblers.

    One of the focal points in the discussion was that higher levels of negative affectivity may be a cause of elevated problems rather than a cause of risk gambling. Another issue discussed was that the level of risk- /problem gambling may be important to consider when comparing gambling motives across subgroups of gamblers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Beyond Recreational Gambling
    Download (jpg)
    Omslagsframsida
  • 20.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Jonsson, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Gambling Motives in a Representative Swedish Sample of Risk Gamblers2016In: Journal of Gambling Studies, ISSN 1050-5350, E-ISSN 1573-3602, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1231-1241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motives for gambling have been shown to be associated with gambling involvement, and hence important in the understanding of the etiology of problem gambling. The aim of this study was to describe differences in gambling motives in different subgroups of lifetime risk gamblers, categorized by: age, gender, alcohol- and drug habits and type of game preferred, when considering the level of risk gambling. A random Swedish sample (n = 19,530) was screened for risk gambling, using the Lie/Bet questionnaire. The study sample (n = 257) consisted of the respondents screening positive on Lie/Bet and completing a postal questionnaire about gambling and motives for gambling (measured with the NODS-PERC and the RGQ respectively). When considering the level of risk gambling, motives for gambling were not associated with gender, whereas younger persons gambled for the challenge more often than did older participants. Card/Casino and Sport gamblers played to a greater extent for social and challenge reasons then did Lotto/Bingo-gamblers. EGM-gamblers played more for coping reasons than did Lotto/Bingo gamblers. However, this association turned non-significant when considering the level of risk gambling. Moderate risk gamblers played for the challenge and coping reasons to a greater extent than low risk gamblers motives for gambling differ across subgroups of preferred game and between gamblers with low and moderate risk. The level of risk gambling is intertwined with motives for gambling and should be considered when examining gambling reasons.

  • 21.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Rosendahl, Ingvar
    Problem Gambling and Psychiatric Comorbidity—Risk and Temporal Sequencing Among Women and Men: Results from the Swelogs Case–Control Study2019In: Journal of Gambling Studies, ISSN 1050-5350, E-ISSN 1573-3602, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 757-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that many problem gamblers also suffer from other psychiatric conditions. However, knowledge regarding the temporal sequencing of the conditions is lacking, as well as insight in possible gender specific patterns. The aim of this study was to examine the risk for psychiatric comorbidity among problem gamblers compared to non-problem gamblers in the general Swedish population, as well as the age of onset and the temporal sequencing of problem gambling and the comorbid psychiatric conditions among lifetime problem gamblers. A case–control study nested in the Swelogs cohort was used. For both the female and the male problem gamblers, the risk for having had a lifetime psychiatric condition was double or more than double compared to the controls. Having experienced anxiety or depression before gambling onset, constituted a risk for developing problem gambling for the women but not for the men. Further, the female cases initiated gambling after their first period of anxiety, depression and problems with substances, and problem gambling was the last condition to evolve. Opposite this, the male cases initiated gambling before any condition evolved, and depression and suicidal events emerged after problem gambling onset. There were large differences in mean age of onset between the female cases and their controls, this was not the case for the males. Gender specific patterns in the association between problem gambling and psychiatric comorbidity, as well as in the development of problem gambling needs to be considered in treatment planning as well as by the industry in their advertising.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Rosendahl, Ingvar
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The association between at-risk gambling and binge drinking in the general Swedish population2015In: Addictive Behaviors Reports, ISSN 2352-8532, Vol. 2, p. 49-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the association between problem gambling and alcohol use disorders has been studied previously, little is known about the association between risk gambling and risk drinking. This study aimed at examining the association between at-risk gambling and binge drinking in the general Swedish population and to test whether this association remained after controlling for demographic factors. The data was part of a larger ongoing survey in the general Swedish population. Respondents (N = 19 530) were recruited through random digit dialing and interviewed about their alcohol habits (binge drinking), at-risk gambling (the Lie/Bet questionnaire) and demographics (gender, age, education, residence size, marital status, labor market status, country of origin and smoking). There was an association between lifetime at-risk gambling and current (12 months) weekly binge drinking for both men (OR = 1.73; CI 95%: 1.27–2.35) and women (OR = 2.27; CI 95%: 1.05–4.90). After controlling for demographics this association no longer remained significant (OR = 1.38; CI 95%; .99–1.90 for men and OR = 1.99; CI 95%: .94–4.66 for women). Age and smoking had the largest impact on this association. At-risk gambling and binge drinking are associated behaviors. However, it seems as if this association may be confounded by demographic variables. We hypothesize that similarities in personality profiles and health aspects could account for an additional part of the association.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Problem gambling and anxiety disorders in the general swedish population: a case control study2022In: Journal of Gambling Studies, ISSN 1050-5350, E-ISSN 1573-3602, Vol. 38, p. 1257-1268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-occurring psychiatric comorbidity is high among problem gamblers, and anxiety disorders has repeatedly been linked to problem gambling. Less conclusive, however, is the association between problem gambling and specific anxiety disorders. The aim of this study is to examine the association between problem gambling and specific anxiety disorders in subgroups of gender, age and socio-economic status (SES) in the general Swedish population. A case-control design was employed - nested in the Swedish longitudinal gambling study cohort. All anxiety disorders studied - Panic Disorder, Social Phobia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), were significantly associated with problem gambling, however the pattern differed across subgroups. Social Phobia was the anxiety disorder most commonly associated with problem gambling across subgroups. The strongest associations between problem gambling and various anxiety disorders were found in participants under the age of 25, among females, and in the group with middle SES. In those groups three of the four anxiety disorders studied were significantly associated with problem gambling, with different patterns. Quite remarkably, participants under the age of 25 had three times higher risk of having had GAD compared to their controls. Efforts to prevent an escalation of either gambling or anxiety could target the presented vulnerable groups specifically.

  • 24.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Risk Gambling and Personality: Results from a Representative Swedish Sample2015In: Journal of Gambling Studies, ISSN 1050-5350, E-ISSN 1573-3602, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 1287-1295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between personality and gambling has been explored previously. However, few studies are based on representative populations. This study aimed at examining the association between risk gambling and personality in a representative Swedish population. A random Swedish sample (N = 19,530) was screened for risk gambling using the Lie/Bet questionnaire. The study sample (N = 257) consisted of those screening positive on Lie/Bet and completing a postal questionnaire about gambling and personality (measured with the NODS-PERC and the HP5i respectively). Risk gambling was positively correlated with Negative Affectivity (a facet of Neuroticism) and Impulsivity (an inversely related facet of Conscientiousness), but all associations were weak. When taking age and gender into account, there were no differences in personality across game preference groups, though preferred game correlated with level of risk gambling. Risk gamblers scored lower than the population norm data with respect to Negative Affectivity, but risk gambling men scored higher on Impulsivity. The association between risk gambling and personality found in previous studies was corroborated in this study using a representative sample. We conclude that risk and problem gamblers should not be treated as a homogeneous group, and prevention and treatment interventions should be adapted according to differences in personality, preferred type of game and the risk potential of the games.

  • 25.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Wennberg, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    The Association Between Problem Gambling and Suicidal Ideations and Attempts: A Case Control Study in the General Swedish Population2022In: Journal of Gambling Studies, ISSN 1050-5350, E-ISSN 1573-3602, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 319-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between problem gambling and suicidal behaviours is well established in treatment seeking populations, but less explored among sub-clinical problem gamblers in the general population. The aim of this study was to examine the association between problem gambling (including moderate risk gambling) and suicidal ideations/suicide attempts, in the general Swedish population. Another aim was to compare problem gamblers with and without suicide ideation/attempts. A case-control study nested in the Swelogs cohort was used. Both ideations and attempts were about twice as frequent among the cases compared to the controls. After controlling for socio-economic status and life-time mental health problems, suicidal ideation, but not attempts, remained significantly higher among the cases compared to the controls. The largest difference between attempters and non-attempters were on payment defaults and illicit drug abuse, whereas depression yielded the largest difference between ideators and non-ideators. Problem gambling severity (PGSI 8+) resulted in the smallest difference, compared to the other variables, between attempters and non-attempters. Even though no conclusion regarding the casual relationship can be drawn in this type of study, it seems like sub-clinical levels of problem gambling might have an impact on suicidal ideations whereas for suicide attempts to occur, other factors need to be present. In addition to mental health issues, financial difficulties may be such factors.

  • 26.
    Sundström, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm Health Care Services, Sweden.
    Forsström, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm Health Care Services, Sweden.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Khadjesari, Zarnie
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    What do we know about alcohol internet interventions aimed at employees?: A scoping review2023In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 11, article id 929782Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Internet interventions are a promising avenue for delivering alcohol prevention to employees. The objective of this scoping review was to map all research on alcohol internet interventions aimed at employees regardless of design, to gain an overview of current evidence and identify potential knowledge gaps.

    Methods: We conducted a literature search in three data bases (PsycInfo, PubMed, and Web of Science). Eligibility criteria were that (1) the study targeted employees age ≥18 years; (2) the intervention was delivered predominantly online; (3) the study focused specifically or in part on alcohol use; and (4) the study was published in English in a peer-reviewed academic journal. Two reviewers independently screened, reviewed, and extracted data.

    Results: Twenty studies were included, of which 10 were randomized controlled trials, five were secondary analyses, three were feasibility trials, one was a cohort study and one described the rationale and development of an intervention. No qualitative studies were found. Randomized trials tended to show effects when interventions were compared to waitlists but not when more intensive interventions were compared to less intensive ones. We identified two design-related aspects where studies differed; (1) whether all applicants were included regardless of alcohol use level and (2) whether the intervention was explicitly framed as alcohol-focused or not. Significant recruitment problems were noted in several studies.

    Conclusions: Alcohol internet interventions hold promise in delivering alcohol prevention to employees, but heterogeneity in study design and difficulties in recruitment complicate interpretation of findings.

  • 27.
    Svensson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; The Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Gambling among Swedish youth: Predictors and prevalence among 15-and 17-year-old students2019In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 177-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gambling among adolescents is a growing public health concern in Sweden as in many other countries. Excessive gambling has been found to be associated with a wide range of negative consequences such as financial problems, strained relationships, criminal behaviour, depression, and an elevated risk for suicide. Research suggests a link between alcohol consumption and gambling, particularly among male gamblers. There are nevertheless gaps in the available knowledge pertaining to school-aged students in Sweden. Aim: The purpose of this study is to investigate predictors of gambling and frequent gambling among Swedish students in Grade 9 and Grade 11 (ages 15 and 17 years). Data and method: Data on gambling and alcohol consumption were obtained from the Swedish Council on Information and Other Drugs yearly school surveys (n = 4763) in Grade 9 and Grade 11 (n = 3720). Poisson regression models have been applied to estimate the association between less frequent and frequent gambling with the predictors of gender, family and school satisfaction, school situation, and alcohol and drug use. Results: Gambling among Swedish students is a highly gendered activity: boys gamble more and more frequently than girls. Having consumed alcohol was associated with both less frequent and more frequent gambling among Grade 9 students while controlling for other variables. In Grade 9, heavy episodic drinking was only associated with less frequent gambling, not with frequent gambling. Among Grade 11 students, both alcohol consumption and heavy episodic drinking was associated with less frequent gambling but heavy episodic drinking was only associated with frequent gambling. Moreover, drug use was associated with less frequent gambling in Grade 11. Skipping classes was the only school factor that was found to be associated with less frequent gambling (Grade 11). Such factors as family satisfaction and two measurements of economic situation were not associated with gambling at all.

  • 28.
    Wennberg, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Psychometric Properties of the Swedish Version of the Reasons for Gambling Questionnaire (RGQ)2017In: Journal of gambling issues, ISSN 1910-7595, no 37, p. 172-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Reasons for Gambling Questionnaire (RGQ) is a self-report instrument containing 15 items to assess individual motives or reasons to gamble. This study presents psychometric data on the Swedish version of the instrument with a focus on factor structure. A Swedish sample (N = 19,530) was screened for risk gambling with the Lie/Bet questionnaire, the effective study sample (n = 237) consisting of respondents with a positive answer on this questionnaire who agreed to participate in an additional postal questionnaire and had no missing items on the RGQ. The originally proposed subscales of the instrument fit the data poorly and a slightly different five-factor solution was suggested. We conclude that the RGQ needs further revision and that the dimensionality of gambling motives is a question that deserves further attention.

  • 29. Wilson Martinez, Martina
    et al.
    Berglund, Kristina
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Sundqvist, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Swedish Managers’ and HR-Officers’ Experiences and Perceptions of Participating in Alcohol Prevention Skills Training: A Qualitative Study2022In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 756343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of this study was to explore Swedish managers’ and HR-officers’ experiences and perceptions of skills training including a development and implementation of an alcohol policy.

    Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with Swedish managers (n = 44) and HR-officers (n = 9) from nine different organizations whom had received skills training and an organizational policy implementation. The interviews were analyzed using thematic analyses.

    Results: In total, nine themes were identified as: The prevalence of alcohol problems: a wake-up call; a reminder to intervene immediately; an altered view of the responsibility of the employer; initiating conversations about alcohol: a useful toolbox; an imprecise, yet positive, memory; increased awareness of issues related to alcohol culture; I have not heard a word about a new alcohol policy; the alcohol policy: a mere piece of paper; and alcohol problem prevention: hardly a low-hanging fruit. Participants’ experiences of the skills training were positive overall.

    Conclusion: Various aspects of the skills training were appreciated by managers and HR-officers, including insight of prevalence statistics and employer responsibilities. Participants emphasized the value of repeated skills training occasions for retaining knowledge. Future research may investigate further in what way skills training may affect managers’ willingness to engage in workplace alcohol prevention. Since the implementation of any policy had gone unnoticed to participants, a reason for which could be related to the notion of the existing policy as “good enough” in its current condition, implementation and organizational issues, or a reluctance to address alcohol-related matters unless necessary; future research may focus on investigating in what manner alcohol policies are in fact utilized within organizations.

1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf