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  • 1.
    Mille, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    A structural and thermal conductivity study of a highly porous, hierarchical polyhedral nanofoam shells made by templating silica onto microemulsion films on the surface of emulsified oil dropsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Mille, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Templating and self-assembly of biomimetic materials2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the use of biomolecular assemblies for creating materials with novel properties. Several aspects of biomimetic materials have been investigated, from fundamental studies on membrane shaping molecules to the integration of biomolecules with inorganic materials.

    Triply periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) are mathematically defined surfaces that partition space and present a large surface area in a confined space. These surfaces have analogues in many physical systems. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can form intricate structures and it acts as a replica for the wing scales of the butterfly C. rubi, which is characterized by electron microscopy and reflectometry. It was shown to contain a photonic crystal and an analogue to a TPMS. These photonic crystals have been replicated in silica and titania, leading to blue scales with replication on the nanometer scale. Replicas analyzed with left and right handed polarized light are shown be optically active.

    A macroporous hollow core particle was synthesized using a double templating method where a swollen block copolymer was utilized to create polyhedral nanofoam. Emulsified oil was used as a secondary template which gave hollow spheres with thin porous walls. The resulting material had a high porosity and low thermal conductivity.

    The areas of inorganic materials and functional biomolecules were combined to create a functional nanoporous endoskeleton. The membrane protein ATP synthase were incorporated in liposomes which were deposited on nanoporous silica spheres creating a tight and functional membrane. Using confocal microscopy, it was possible to follow the transport of Na+ through the membrane.

    Yop1p is a membrane protein responsible for shaping the ER. The protein was purified and reconstituted into liposomes of three different sizes. The vesicles in the 10-20 nm size range resulted in tubular structures. Thus, it was shown that Yop1p acts as a stabilizer of high curvature structures.

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  • 3.
    Mille, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Corkery, Robert W.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Div Phys Chem, Dept Chem, Stockholm.
    A structural and thermal conductivity study of highly porous, hierarchical polyhedral nanofoam shells made by condensing silica in microemulsion films on the surface of emulsified oil drops2013In: Journall of Material Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 1, no 5, p. 1849-1859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Light-weight solid foams are utilized in applications such as packaging and insulation mainly due to their intrinsically high porosity, low relative density and associated mechanical and transport properties. Here hollow core spherical shells are prepared with walls made of a polyhedral silica nanofoam with open cells. A microemulsion film at the oil-water interface of oil droplets is used as a soft structural template for the condensation of soluble silica species. The microemulsion sets the length scale of the monodisperse silica nanofoam cells, and the emulsion droplets set the micron-scale dimensions of the polydisperse spherical shells. Porosity is achieved by removing the templates and oils, leaving pure low-density silica. This results in a hierarchically structured, highly porous shell foam material that packs into beds with a measured porosity of approximately 97.3%, well into the range of silica aerogels. Using a combination of electron microscopy, small-angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction and nitrogen physisorption, an accurate structural model for the nanofoam shells is constructed. The material is shown to be comprised of open-cell foams that are structurally analogous to dry polyhedral soap froths having minimal surface partitions, and Plateau boundaries. The primary polyhedral nanofoam cells are 30 nm in diameter connected by 7 nm cylindrical windows. These nanofoams form spherical monolithic shells with volume average mean diameter of 41 microns and shell thickness of 0.7 microns. Simple models for the thermal conductivity of these nanofoam shell materials are constructed that include accounting for the nanoscale effects on gaseous and solid thermal conductivity. These are compared to the measured value of 0.041 W m(-1) K-1. These materials represent new structures in the family of self-assembled, highly porous silica materials and are potentially useful in packaging and insulation and other applications due to their light weight and/or intrinsically low thermal conductivity and associated mechanical and transport properties.

  • 4.
    Mille, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Tyrode, Eric C.
    Corkery, Robert W.
    3d titania photonic crystals replicated from gyroid structures in butterfly wing scales: approaching full band gaps at visible wavelengths2013In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 3109-3117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3D titania photonic crystals are replicated from single gyroid structures found in the butterfly Callophrys rubi. Photonic crystals were characterised using SEM imaging, X-ray and Raman scattering and reflection spectroscopy. The overall symmetry and topology of the original single gyroid structures is replicated with high fidelity. Titania replicas display photonic responses that are thermal history dependent. Replicas treated at 700 degrees C, show up to 96% reflectivity at similar to 505 nm, while at lower and higher treatment temperatures the photonic response was not as pronounced. Simulated band structures fitted to the observed spectral reflectivity data constrain the solid volume fractions and dielectric constants of the replicas. The titania photonic crystals were also found to be optically active, with both left- and right-handed single gyroids contributing to the chiral response. The 3D titania photonic crystals replicated here have nearly complete overlapping of partial band gaps, strongly suggesting that materials with full photonic band gaps are experimentally within reach using the general replication approach reported here.

  • 5. Mille, Christian
    et al.
    Tyrode, Eric C
    Corkery, Robert W
    Approaching full band gaps in visible wavelength, 3D chiral photonic crystalsArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Mille, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Tyrode, Eric C.
    Corkery, Robert W.
    Stockholm University.
    Inorganic chiral 3-D photonic crystals with bicontinuous gyroid structure replicated from butterfly wing scales2011In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 47, no 35, p. 9873-9875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three dimensional silica photonic crystals with the gyroid minimal surface structure have been synthesized. The butterfly Callophrys rubi was used as a biotemplate. This material represents a significant addition to the small family of synthetic bicontinuous photonic crystals.

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    fulltext
  • 7.
    Mille, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Tyrode, Eric C
    Corkery, Robert W
    Structural colours in butterflies - preferred orientation of photonic crystals in C rubiManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Oliynyk, Vitaliy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Mille, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Ng, Jovice B. S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    von Ballmoos, Christoph
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Corkery, Robert W.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Selective and atp driven transport of ions across supported membranes into nanoporous carriers using gramicidin a and atp synthase2013In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 2733-2740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a robust and versatile membrane protein based system for selective uptake and release of ions from nanoporous particles sealed with ion-tight lipid bilayers of various compositions that is driven by the addition of ATP or a chemical potential gradient. We have successfully incorporated both a passive ion channel-type peptide (gramicidin A) and a more complex primary sodium ion transporter (ATP synthase) into the supported lipid bilayers on solid nanoporous silica particles. Protein-mediated controlled release/uptake of sodium ions across the ion-tight lipid bilayer seal from or into the nanoporous silica carrier was imaged in real time using a confocal laser scanning microscope and the intensity changes were quantified. ATP-driven transport of sodium ions across the supported lipid bilayer against a chemical gradient was demonstrated. The possibility of designing durable carriers with tight lipid membranes, containing membrane proteins for selective ion uptake and release, offers new possibilities for functional studies of single or cascading membrane protein systems and could also be used as biomimetic microreactors for controlled synthesis of inorganic multicomponent materials.

  • 9. Oliynyk, Vitaliy
    et al.
    Mille, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ng, Jovice B S
    von Ballmoos, Christoph
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Corkery, Robert W
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Selective and ATP-driven transport of ions across supported membranes into nanoporous carriers using gramicidin A and ATP synthaseArticle in journal (Refereed)
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