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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Göta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Children's knowledge-building in arithmetic in the compulsory school and in the special school for intellectually disabled in Sweden2010In: The First Sourcebook on Nordic Research in Mathematics Education: Norway, Sweden, Iceland, Denmark and contributions from Finland / [ed] Bharath Sriraman ... [et al.], Charlotte: Information Age Pub. , 2010, p. 397-410Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigations have been conducted in a compulsory school and in a special school for intellectually disabled students in Sweden to examine children’s conceptual development in early arithmetic. The studies were based on the epistemology of radical constructivism and the methodology of multiple clinical interviews. A theoretical model elucidates the behavior patterns and the corresponding mental structures underlying them. The individual interviews were video recorded. In this chapter, results are shown, and various behavior patterns that emerge when the participants solve tasks in their own ways are exemplified, conceptually analyzed, and compared. The activated behavior patterns, which are responses to well-adapted contexts presented by the researcher, are compatible between children at the same conceptual level irrespective of age or type of school. The study gives substantial impetus to change the education in early arithmetic to harmonize with the children’s own ways of operating.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Göta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    En inkluderande undervisning i matematik. Vad kan det innebära?2007In: Proceedings of the 3rd Nordic Research Conference on Special Needs Education in Mathematics / [ed] L. Ø. Johansen, Aalborg: Adgangskursus, Aalborg Universitet , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    My aim in this article is to clarify the notion of inclusion in relation to teaching and learning in early arithmetic. Firstly, I investigate how the content is constructed in a normalizing as opposed to a triadic teaching process and the mediating effects on children’s knowledge acquisition. Secondly, I examine how these processes relate to practical and theoretical concepts. My conclusion is that the normalizing process has equality as a goal for instruction, i.e. giving the same predetermined, formalized content to different individuals, resulting in the exclusion of children with practical concepts. In the triadic process the arithmetic content is adjusted to varying abilities of the children. Logically, the child’s cultural development becomes progressively related to both practical and theoretical knowledge, making the possibility of inclusion more plausible. Thus, inclusion is not given once and for all but turns into a longitudinal progressive and interactive process.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Göta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Special education and early arithmetic knowledge-building2009In: Special education in the 21st century / [ed] MaryAnn T. Burton, Nova Science Publishers inc. , 2009, p. 1-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Eriksson, Göta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Supervision of teachers based on adjusted arithmetic learning in special school2008In: The journal of Mathematical Behavior, ISSN 0732-3123, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 264-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on 20 children’s learning in arithmetic after teaching was adjusted to their conceptual development. The report covers periods from three months up to three terms in an ongoing intervention study of teachers and children in schools for the intellectually disabled and of remedial teaching in regular schools. The researcher classified each child’s current counting scheme before and after each term. Recurrent supervision, aiming to facilitate the teachers’ modelling of their children’s various conceptual levels and needs of learning, was conducted by the researcher. The teaching content in harmony with each child’s ability was discussed with the teachers. This approach gives the teachers the opportunity to experience the children’s own operational ways of solving problems. At the supervision meetings, the teachers theorized their practice together with the researcher, ending up with consistent models of the arithmetic of the child. So far, the children’s and the teachers’ learning patterns are promising.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Göta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Tidig aritmetisk kunskapsbildning. Ett specialpedagogiskt perspektiv2004In: Democracy and participation. A challenge for special needs education: proceedings of the 2nd Nordic Research Conference on Special Needs Education in Mathematics / [ed] Arne Engström, Örebro: Pedagogiska institutionen, Örebro universitet , 2004, p. 149-161Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Radical constructivism gives us a way of thinking about how to learn something. Learning through teaching the child as a competent communicator in a developmental perspective is in focus. What the child does when communicating about arithmetic problems is in the forefront instead of the traditional view of what communication can do with the child.

     

    Consequently arithmetic knowledge is an individual and evolving process. Early practical forms initiate and make possible later more complex ones. Hence we set our own formal arithmetical knowledge on the side in our decisions about how to teach the child and focus on the child’s knowledge. We need to focus learning on how the child constructs inter-mental processes as a result of modifying earlier knowledge when solving arithmetic problems. A model of the child’s early arithmetic can be constructed by longitudinally analysing children’s intra-mental structures through inter-mental processes. Then learning can guide the teaching process.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Göta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Toward a student-centred process of teaching arithmetic2010In: The Journal of Mathematical Behavior, ISSN 0732-3123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes a way toward a student-centred process of teaching arithmetic, where the content is harmonized with the students’ conceptual levels. At school start, one class- room teacher is guided in recurrent teaching development meetings in order to develop teaching based on the students’ prerequisites and to successively learn the students’ arith- metic. The students are assessed in interviews. Two special teachers participate and their current models of each student’s arithmetic are tested when assessing the students. The students’ conceptual diversity and the consequent different content in teaching are shown. Further, the special teachers’ assessments and the class teacher’s opinion of the new way of teaching are reported. A wide range both of the students’ conceptual levels and of the kinds of relevant problems was found. The special teachers manage their duties well and the classroom teacher has so far been satisfied with the new teaching process.

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