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  • 1.
    Enell, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Hamasaka, Yasutaka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Kolodziejczyk, Agata
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Nässel, Dick R
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Functional Morphology.
    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling components in Drosophila: immunocytochemical localization of GABA(B) receptors in relation to the GABA(A) receptor subunit RDL and a vesicular GABA transporter.2007In: Journal of Comparative Neurology, ISSN 0021-9967, E-ISSN 1096-9861, Vol. 505, no 1, p. 18-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in insects and is widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS). GABA acts on ion channel receptors (GABAAR) for fast inhibitory transmission and on G-protein-coupled ones (GABABR) for slow and modulatory action. We used immunocytochemistry to map GABABR sites in the Drosophila CNS and compared the distribution with that of the GABAAR subunit RDL. To identify GABAergic synapses, we raised an antiserum to the vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT). For general GABA distribution, we utilized an antiserum to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD1) and a gad1-GAL4 to drive green fluorescent protein. GABABR-immunoreactive (IR) punctates were seen in specific patterns in all major neuropils of the brain. Most abundant labeling was seen in the mushroom body calyces, ellipsoid body, optic lobe neuropils, and antennal lobes. The RDL distribution is very similar to that of GABABR-IR punctates. However, the mushroom body lobes displayed RDL-IR but not GABABR-IR material, and there were subtle differences in other areas. The vGAT antiserum labeled punctates in the same areas as the GABABR and appeared to display presynaptic sites of GABAergic neurons. Various GAL4 drivers were used to analyze the relation between GABABR distribution and identified neurons in adults and larvae. Our findings suggest that slow GABA transmission is very widespread in the Drosophila CNS and that fast RDL-mediated transmission generally occurs at the same sites. J. Comp. Neurol. 505:18–31, 2007.

  • 2. Gmeiner, Florian
    et al.
    Kolodziejczyk, Agata
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Yoshii, Taishi
    Rieger, Dirk
    Nässel, Dick R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte
    GABA(B) receptors play an essential role in maintaining sleep during the second half of the night in Drosophila melanogaster2013In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 216, no 20, p. 3837-3843Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GABAergic signalling is important for normal sleep in humans and flies. Here we advance the current understanding of GABAergic modulation of daily sleep patterns by focusing on the role of slow metabotropic GABA(B) receptors in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. We asked whether GABA(B)-R2 receptors are regulatory elements in sleep regulation in addition to the already identified fast ionotropic Rdl GABA(A) receptors. By immunocytochemical and reporter-based techniques we show that the pigment dispersing factor (PDF)-positive ventrolateral clock neurons (LNv) express GABA(B)-R2 receptors. Downregulation of GABA(B)-R2 receptors in the large PDF neurons (l-LNv) by RNAi reduced sleep maintenance in the second half of the night, whereas sleep latency at the beginning of the night that was previously shown to depend on ionotropic Rdl GABA(A) receptors remained unaltered. Our results confirm the role of the l-LNv neurons as an important part of the sleep circuit in D. melanogaster and also identify the GABA(B)-R2 receptors as the thus far missing component in GABA-signalling that is essential for sleep maintenance. Despite the significant effects on sleep, we did not observe any changes in circadian behaviour in flies with downregulated GABA(B)-R2 receptors, indicating that the regulation of sleep maintenance via l-LNv neurons is independent of their function in the circadian clock circuit.

  • 3.
    Kolodziejczyk, Agata
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Chemical circuitry in the visual system of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Signal processing in the visual system is mediated by classic neurotransmission and neuropeptidergic modulatory pathways. In Dipteran insects, especially in the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, the morphology of the visual system is very well described. However neurotransmitter and neuropeptidergic circuits within the optic lobe neuropil are only partially known.

    Using several transgenic fly lines and antibodies we determined the localization of the classical neurotransmitters GABA, acetylcholine and glutamate in the visual system, and their putative targets via detecting several neurotransmitter receptors. We paid particular attention to the peripheral neuropil layer called the lamina, where the light signals are filtered, channeled and amplified (Paper I).

    We discovered four new types of efferent tangential neurons branching distally to the lamina. Among them was the first neuropeptidergic neuron (LMIo) in this region of Drosophila. The LMIo expresses myoinhibitory peptide (MIP) and has its cell body located close to the main lateral clock neurons that express the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF)(Paper II).

    Since in other Dipteran species PDF is expressed in processes distally to the lamina, we performed comparative anatomical studies of the MIP, PDF, Ion Transport Peptide (ITP) and serotonin (5-HT) distribution in the visual system of the flies Drosophila and Calliphora. Our data suggest that PDF signaling distal to the lamina of the blowfly might be replaced by MIP signaling in the fruitfly, while ITP and 5-HT expression is conserved in the two species (Paper III).

    Serotonin is crucial in light adaptation during the daily light-dark cycles. We analyzed putative serotonergic circuits in the lamina. We found that LMIo neurons express the inhibitory receptor 5-HT1A, while 5-HT1B and 5-HT2 are both expressed in the epithelial glia of the lamina. Another novel wide-field neuron with lamina branches expresses the excitatory serotonin receptor 5-HT7. Our studies have identified a fairly complex neuronal circuitry in the tangential plexus above the lamina. (Paper IV).

    Finally we tested circadian locomotor activity rhythms in flies with the GABAB receptor knocked down on the lateral PDF-expressing clock neurons. We observed significant changes in the activity periods and diminished strength of rhythmicity during DD suggesting a modulatory role of GABA in clock function (Paper V).

  • 4.
    Kolodziejczyk, Agata
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Neurotransmitters in the visual system of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Kolodziejczyk, Agata
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Nichols, Charles
    Nässel, Dick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Distribution of serotonin receptors in the visual system of the DrosophilaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kolodziejczyk, Agata
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Nässel, Dick R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    A novel wide-field neuron with branches in the lamina of the Drosophila visual system expresses myoinhibitory peptide and may be associated with the clock2011In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 343, no 2, p. 357-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although neuropeptides are widespread throughout the central nervous system of the fruifly Drosophila, no records exist of peptidergic neurons in the first synaptic region of the visual system, the lamina. Here, we describe a novel type of neuron that has wide-field tangential arborizations just distal to the lamina neuropil and that expresses myoinhibitory peptide (MIP). The cell bodies of these neurons, designated lateral MIP-immunoreactive optic lobe (LMIo) neurons, lie anteriorly at the base of the medulla of the optic lobe. The LMIo neurons also arborize in several layers of the medulla and in the dorso-lateral and lateral protocerebrum. Since the LMIo resemble LN(v) clock neurons, we have investigated the relationships between these two sets of neurons by combining MIP-immunolabeling with markers for two of the clock genes, viz., Cryptochrome and Timeless, or with antisera to two peptides expressed in clock neurons, viz., pigment-dispersing factor and ion transport peptide. LMIo neurons do not co-express any of these clock neuron markers. However, branches of LMIo and clock neurons overlap in several regions. Furthermore, the varicose lamina branches of LMIo neurons superimpose those of two large bilateral serotonergic neurons. The close apposition of the terminations of MIP- and serotonin-producing neurons distal to the lamina suggests that they have the same peripheral targets. Our data indicate that the LMIo neurons are not bona fide clock neurons, but they may be associated with the clock system and regulate signaling peripherally in the visual system.

  • 7.
    Kolodziejczyk, Agata
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Nässel, Dick R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Myoinhibitory peptide (MIP) immunoreactivity in the visual system of the blowfly Calliphora vomitoria in relation to putative clock neurons and serotonergic neurons2011In: Cell and Tissue Research, ISSN 0302-766X, E-ISSN 1432-0878, Vol. 345, no 1, p. 125-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A few types of peptidergic clock neurons have been identified in the fruitfly Drosophila, whereas in blowflies, only pigment-dispersing factor (PDF)-immunoreactive lateral ventral clock neurons (LNvs) have been described. In blowflies, but not Drosophila, a subset of these PDF-expressing neurons supplies axon branches to a region outside the synaptic layer of the lamina, the most peripheral optic lobe neuropil. In Drosophila, similar lamina processes are instead supplied by non-clock neurons (LMIo) that express myoinhibitory peptide (MIP). We have investigated the distribution of MIP-immunoreactive neurons in the visual system of the blowfly Calliphora vomitoria and found neurons resembling the three LMIos, but without processes to the lamina. In Calliphora, PDF-immunoreactive processes of LNvs in the lamina closely impinge on branching serotonin-immunoreactive axon terminations in the same region. We have also identified, in the blowfly, two types of putative clock neurons that label with an antiserum to ion-transport peptide (ITP). The presence of serotonin-immunoreactive neurons supplying processes to the lamina seems to be a conserved feature in dipteran flies. The morphology of the two types of ITP-immunoreactive clock neurons might also be conserved. However, peptidergic neurons with branches converging on the serotonin-immunoreactive neurons in the lamina are of different morphological types and express PDF in blowflies and MIP in Drosophila. The central circuitry of these PDF- and MIP-expressing neurons probably differs; consequently, whether their convergence on serotonergic neurons subserves similar functions in the two species is unclear.

  • 8.
    Kolodziejczyk, Agata
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Rieger, Dirk
    Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte
    Nässel, Dick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The GABAB receptor is expressed by PDF-producing clockneurons and modulates circadian locomotor activity in DrosophilaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Kolodziejczyk, Agata
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Sun, Xuejun
    Meinertzhagen, Ian A.
    Nässel, Dick R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Glutamate, GABA and acetylcholine signaling components in the lamina of the Drosophila visual system2008In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 3, no 5, p. e2110-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synaptic connections of neurons in the Drosophila lamina, the most peripheral synaptic region of the visual system, have been comprehensively described. Although the lamina has been used extensively as a model for the development and plasticity of synaptic connections, the neurotransmitters in these circuits are still poorly known. Thus, to unravel possible neurotransmitter circuits in the lamina of Drosophila we combined Gal4 driven green fluorescent protein in specific lamina neurons with antisera to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid decarboxylase, a GABAB type of receptor, L-glutamate, a vesicular glutamate transporter (vGluT), ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, choline acetyltransferase and a vesicular acetylcholine transporter. We suggest that acetylcholine may be used as a neurotransmitter in both L4 monopolar neurons and a previously unreported type of wide-field tangential neuron (Cha-Tan). GABA is the likely transmitter of centrifugal neurons C2 and C3 and GABAB receptor immunoreactivity is seen on these neurons as well as the Cha-Tan neurons. Based on an rdl-Gal4 line, the ionotropic GABAA receptor subunit RDL may be expressed by L4 neurons and a type of tangential neuron (rdl-Tan). Strong vGluT immunoreactivity was detected in α-processes of amacrine neurons and possibly in the large monopolar neurons L1 and L2. These neurons also express glutamate-like immunoreactivity. However, antisera to ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors did not produce distinct immunosignals in the lamina. In summary, this paper describes novel features of two distinct types of tangential neurons in the Drosophila lamina and assigns putative neurotransmitters and some receptors to a few identified neuron types.

1 - 9 of 9
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