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  • 1.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    A Note from the Guest Editor2019In: The Opera quarterly, ISSN 0736-0053, E-ISSN 1476-2870, Vol. 35, no 1-2, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    An Incomplete Life: Lulu and the Performance of Unfinishedness2019In: The Opera quarterly, ISSN 0736-0053, E-ISSN 1476-2870, Vol. 35, no 1-2, p. 20-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Anne Sexton omförhandlade sitt jag i dikten2012In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, Vol. Juni, no 21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Bleston Babel: Migration, Multilingualism and Intertextuality in W.G. Sebald’s Mancunian Cantical2013In: Languages of Exile: Migration and Multilingualism in Twentieth-Century Literature / [ed] Axel Englund, Anders Olsson, Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien,: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013, p. 261-280Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Englund, Axel
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    British Rail Katabasis: W.G. Sebald's Day Return2014In: German Life and Letters, ISSN 0016-8777, E-ISSN 1468-0483, Vol. 67, no SI, p. 120-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the analogy between language and location, and between travel and interpretation, in the hitherto little-studied poetry of W.G. Sebald. Its primary example is Day Return', a two-part poem from the early 1980s, which describes a train trip through East Anglia to London and back. This poem develops the analogy between language and location in various ways. For one thing, it is a bilingual text: it intersperses a number of English lines among the German ones, evoking the linguistic ambiguity inherent in the experience of the expatriate writer. Moreover, as Sebald's lyrical I' passes Ipswich, Romford, Stratford and Maryland on the way to Liverpool Street Station, he weaves these sites together in an intertextual web involving, among others, Dante, Kafka and Samuel Pepys. Finally, the journey is allegorically construed by the poetic voice as a descent into (and return from) the underworld. While many of these themes are familiar from Sebald's later work, the value of his poems does not depend upon their relation to his canonised prose: they are fascinating literary constructs in their own right, deserving of close critical attention. Dieser Artikel behandelt die Analogie zwischen Sprache und Ort, sowie zwischen Reise und Interpretation, in der bisher wenig untersuchten Lyrik W.G. Sebalds, anhand von Day Return', einem zweiteiligen Gedicht aus den fruhen 1980er Jahren. Dieses Gedicht, das eine Zugfahrt durch East Anglia nach London und zuruck beschreibt, entwickelt die Analogie zwischen Sprache und Ort auf mehrerlei Weise. Erstens ist es ein zweisprachiger Text, der durchsetzt ist mit englischen Zeilen, und somit den sprachlichen Zwiespalt evoziert, der der Erfahrung des ausgewanderten Dichters innewohnt. uberdies webt Sebalds lyrisches Ich, als er auf dem Weg in Richtung Liverpool Street Station Ipswich, Romford, und die Londoner Stadtteile Stratford und Maryland passiert, diese Orte zu einem intertextuellen Netz zusammen, das, unter anderem, Dante, Kafka und Samuel Pepys einschlie ss t. Schlie ss lich wird die Reise des lyrischen Subjekts als ein Hinabsteigen in die (und Heraufsteigen aus der) Unterwelt allegorisch gedeutet. Wenn auch viele dieser Themen aus Sebalds spateren Werken bekannt sind, ist der Wert seiner Gedichte nicht von ihrer Beziehung zu seiner kanonisierten Prosa abhangig: sie sind faszinierende literarische Werke an sich, die sorgfaltige kritische Aufmerksamkeit verdient haben.

  • 6.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Celan gjorde erotiken till lyrik2010In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 24 majArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Cosmos and corporeality: notes on music in Sachs’s poetry2014In: Nelly Sachs im Kontext: Eine ‘Schwester Kafkas’? / [ed] Florian Strob, Charlie Louth, Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter, 2014, p. 51-72Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A thread of music is woven into the texture of Nelly Sachs’s poetry. Her verses evoke a host of musical motifs, in her early work mostly derived from the tradition of Romantic poetry in which music plays so important a part. As Sachs’s language progresses into her mature style, however, the configuration of these motifs is marked by an increasing idiosyncrasy. This article traces the development of two such musically tempered motifs, which recur throughout Sachs’s oeuvre. The first is the notion of a cosmic music: songs sung by the stars and the earth, the moon and the tide. This motif is rooted in the concept of the musica mundana, which organizes the universe but which, in Sachs’s interpretation, has been profoundly disturbed by earthly terror. The second is the conflation of music with emphatically corporeal images of death. In formulations reminiscent of the medieval Totentanz, Sachs casts the dead or wounded body as an instrument played upon by external agencies. These two musical motifs, moreover, are interconnected through a highly personal mysticism that posits a link between the microcosm of the human body, steeped in the concrete, painful experience of everyday existence, and the macrocosm of an intangible and hidden universe beyond the visible world. Thus, not only Sachs’s most original employment of melopoetic imagery, but also the outlines of a worldview that lies at the very core of her poetic project, can be found at the point of intersection between corporeal and cosmic music. 

  • 8.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Det kodade meddelandet: metaforisk interaktion och dödslängtan i Per Olov Enquists Nedstörtad ängel2006In: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, Vol. 1, p. 62-78Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Per Olov Enquist's 1985 novel Nedstörtad ängel (Downfall) is, despite its modest proportions, one of the most poetically powerful and intriguing works in his oeuvre. It consists of a number of disparate stories which are presented as intertwined fragments. This article argues that the novel creates its meaning in the manner of a large-scale metaphor, in which the different stories serve as the constituent subjects.

  • 9.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Dikt och musik i förintelsens skugga: Om Paul Celans poesi2012In: Nutida Musik, ISSN 1652-6082, no 4, p. 36-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Fussl, Irene, "Geschenke an Aufmerksame": Hebräische Intertextualität und mystische Weltauffassung in der Lyrik Paul Celans2010In: Seminar (Toronto), ISSN 0037-1939, E-ISSN 1911-026X, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 184-185Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    George Benjamin: Lessons in Love and Violence2018In: The Opera quarterly, ISSN 0736-0053, E-ISSN 1476-2870, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 103-111Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History of Literature and History of Ideas, Department of History of Literature.
    (Im)possibilities of Communication: Celan, Ruzicka, Dittrich2008In: Perspectives of New Music, ISSN 0031–6016, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 5-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Intermedial Topography and Metaphorical Interaction2010In: Media Borders, Intermediality and Multimodality / [ed] Lars Elleström, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan , 2010, p. 69-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As illustrated by the title of this volume, we often tend to think of arts and media in terms of geographic areas delineated by definable borders, and consequently of intermedial and interartial studies as a kind of topographical descriptions. Focusing on relations between music and literature, this article points to some of the implications of this topographical model, and contrasts it to another way of conceptualizing intermedial relations, namely as metaphorical phenomena. I argue that many musico-literary artefacts can be understood as a metaphorical interaction between their musical and verbal elements. Such interaction deals with, on the one hand, specific material ideas contained in each musico-literary work and, on the other hand, general ideas about the concepts “music” and “literature”. Hence, each musico-literary artefact can be understood as a meta-medial utterance, potentially altering the way we conceive of these arts and redrawing, as it were, the borders of the medial territories. I believe the metaphorical perspective to be a high-yielding one, but one which also entails at least a partial suspension of the topographical model: the metaphorical interaction between two elements presupposes their simultaneous presence. Such simultaneity, however, is suppressed by the topographical model, since it prompts us to envision the medial areas as spatially separate. As a result of this, the topographical model invites us to conceive of intermedial artefacts as objects which have been transported – carried across the bridge, as it were – into  foreign territory, their identity remaining essentially unaltered even when their medium of origin is out of the picture. The metaphorical perspective, I argue, can help us get past this way of conceptualizing intermediality, as well as the equally questionable notions of media as historically constant and definable in terms of definite, essential characteristics.

  • 14.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Intimate Practices: Music, Sex, and the Body in J. M. Coetzee's Summertime2017In: Mosaic, ISSN 0027-1276, E-ISSN 1925-5683, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 99-115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Kärlek och uppror: lyrikens målbrott i Sångernas bok2011In: Sångernas bok: Heinrich Heine / [ed] Martin Tegen (urval och tolkning, övers.), Stockholm: Themis , 2011, p. 259-273Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Sångernas bok, som blev Heinrich Heines mest spridda och kända diktverk, uppvisar lyriken i ett förändringsskede; här bryts en romantisk poesi med ironiska drag mot en modernare ton på friare vers.Samlingen innehåller fem delar: Unga smärtor, Lyriskt intermezzo, Hemkomsten, Harzresan och Nordsjön.

  • 16.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    ’L’invisible et l’inaudible’: aspects de la performativité chez Celan et Leibowitz2015In: Paul Celan, la poésie, la musique: avec une clé changeante / [ed] Antoine Bonnet, Frédéric Marteau, Paris: Editions Hermann, 2015, p. 377-391Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As a written poem is read aloud or performed in a musical setting, how might the transition from a visible to an audible materiality alter its meaning and its way of generating meaning? What impact does this change have on the relation between semantics and sound structure? How might the particular vocalization of the speaking or singing individual affect the interpretations of the text? The present paper approaches such questions through two late poems by Paul Celan. The po- ems are followed from their written existence on the page through a recorded reading by the author and, finally, into a musical setting by René Leibowitz. Not only do these texts explicitly thematize their own suspension between writtenness and orality, but they also enact the sensory disappearance and threatening collapse of their own language. Spoken and sung, moreover, the poems are subjected to the risks of misrepresentation and misinterpretation inherent in any performance, with concrete and crucial effects on their meaning as a result.

  • 17.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Läsa landskap: två dikter av W.G. Sebald2011In: Lyrikvännen, ISSN 0460-0762, no 5, p. 7-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Operakonsten fylld av sexuella maktrelationer2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 17 juliArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Ord, jord, mord: Celans "Huhediblu"2009In: Ordens negativ: till Anders Olsson / [ed] Anders Cullhed, et al., Stockholm/Stehag: Symposion Brutus Östlings bokförlag, 2009, p. 59-75Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Ordfria stämmor: något om musik och musikalitet i Paul Celans poesi2007In: Kritiker, ISSN 1104-196X, no 6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Sluta sår: Wagner och Adorno läser Heine2011In: Okonstlad konst ?: Om äkthet och autenticitet i estetisk teori och praktik / [ed] Axel Englund & Anna Jörngården, Lindome: Brutus Östlings Bokförlag Symposion AB , 2011, p. 183-195Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Sounding Bodies: Eroticized Music-Making in Proust’s À la Recherche2018In: Essays on Music and Language in Modernist Literature: Musical Modernism / [ed] Katherine O’Callaghan, New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 110-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Still Songs: Music In and Around the Poetry of Paul Celan2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What does it mean for poetry and music to turn to each other, in the shadow of the Holocaust, as a means of aesthetic self-reflection? How can their mutual mirroring, of such paramount importance to German Romanticism, be reconfigured to retain its validity after the Second World War? These are the core questions of Axel Englund's book, which is the first to address the topic of Paul Celan and music. Celan, a Jewish Holocaust survivor who has long been recognized as one of the most important poets of the German language, persistently evoked music and song in his oeuvre, from the juvenilia to the posthumous collections. Conversely, few post-war writers have inspired as large a body of contemporary music, including works by Harrison Birtwistle, György Kurtág, Wolfgang Rihm, Peter Ruzicka and many others. Through rich close readings of poems and musical compositions, Englund's book engages the artistic media in a critical dialogue about the conditions of their existence. In so doing, it reveals their intersection as a site of profound conflict, where the very possibility of musical and poetic meaning is at stake, and confrontations of aesthetic transcendentality and historical remembrance are played out in the wake of twentieth-century trauma.

  • 24.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History of Literature and History of Ideas, Department of History of Literature.
    "Streicht dunkler die Geigen": Berio and Birtwistle in Dialogue with Celan2008In: Sonic Transformations of Literary Texts: From Program Music to Musical Ekphrasis, Hillsdale, NY: Pendragon Press , 2008, p. 119-141Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas.
    Stroke Darkly the Strings: On Paul Celan and Music2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to disclose the oeuvre of the German-Romanian Holocaust survivor Paul Celan as a site of problematic yet productive encounters between poetry and music. It addresses, on the one hand, music as a thematic and structural element in Celan’s poetry and, on the other hand, contemporary musical works interacting with this poetry. These fields are brought together in close readings of poems and scores, to expose a dynamic of musico-literary metaphoricity: in poetry and music alike, the ‘other’ art can be understood as a metaphorical model (or anti-model) aimed at intermedial meta-reflection in the wake of aesthetic rupture and historical trauma.

    The seven chapters of the study demonstrate that music, although vastly neglected by previous research, is a central preoccupation of Celan’s from the earliest poems to the posthumous collections. His work repeatedly throws music into an ambivalent light, thus evading simplistic affirmation or refutation of poetic musicality. Inherited notions of music as paradigmatically pure, transcendent and numinous are either critically deconstructed in the poems, or serve as a poetological image of that from which Celan seeks to distance his work. When the poems tend towards identification with music, it is typically a music configured as terrestrial, corporeal and aimed at inter-human dialogue. For the contemporary compositions, the problem of reference and communication as presented by Celan’s poetry is an ideal means of challenging reductive formalism: by metaphorically projecting this poetry onto their structures, the musical works gain extra-musical relevance without compromising formal complexity. While the musical structures acquire semantic force via the poems, the constant questioning of referential meaning in Celan’s poetry leaks over into the music. Through such dynamic interaction, both poetry and music are able to critically reflect upon their own aesthetic preconditions in the late twentieth century.

  • 26.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    'The Invisible' / 'The Inaudible': Aspects of Performativity in Celan and Leibowitz2012In: Word and Music Studies: Essays on Performativity and on Surveying the Field / [ed] Walter Bernhart, Amsterdam: Rodopi , 2012, p. 121-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As a written poem is read aloud or performed in a musical setting, how might the transition from a visible to an audible materiality alter its meaning and its way of generating meaning? What impact does this change have on the relation between semantics and sound structure? How might the particular vocalization of the speaking or singing individual affect the interpretations of the text? The present paper approaches such questions through two late poems by Paul Celan. The poems are followed from their written existence on the page through a recorded reading by the author and, finally, into a musical setting by René Leibowitz. Not only do these texts explicitly thematize their own suspension between writtenness and orality, but they also enact the sensory disappearance and threatening collapse of their own language. Spoken and sung, moreover, the poems are subjected to the risks of misrepresentation and misinterpretation inherent in any performance, with concrete and crucial effects on their meaning as a result. 

  • 27.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    The Mahlerian mask: Heine's voice and visage in post-war Germany2014In: Word and music studies: on voice / [ed] Walter Bernhart, Lawrence Kramer, Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2014, p. 129-148Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The lyrical oeuvre of Heinrich Heine was a vastly important textual source of German vocal music in the nineteenth century. Heine’s impact on music was reciprocated by the composers’ impact on his poetry, which can scarcely be read without the echoes of Ro- mantic lieder making themselves heard. A century later, the critics and composers of post- war Germany attempted to give a different image of the poet precisely by means of music. Heine remained a complex and controversial writer in the twentieth century, and high stakes were invested in his figure – not only because of his status as a canonized poet, but also because of the difficulties he faced as a German-Jewish writer, both in his lifetime and in the afterlife of literary reception. The present paper addresses three musical (or musical- ly tempered) post-war interpretations of his poetry, in which Theodor W. Adorno, Reiner Bredemeyer, and Hans Werner Henze all claim to unmask the ‘real’ Heine, to see his true face or hear his true voice. Interestingly, all three seem to agree that this ‘real’ Heine has much in common with another German-Jewish artist: Gustav Mahler.

  • 28.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Wagners musik kräver kritisk uppskattning2011In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 20 juliArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Englund, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    W.G. Sebald’s late lyrics between words, images and languages2015In: Interlitteraria, ISSN 1406-0701, E-ISSN 2228-4729, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 123-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    W. G. Sebald wrote and published poetry from the early 1960s until his death in 2001. Even though Sebald’s oeuvre is among the most extensively studied in Germanistik today, however, his lyric poetry remains in the shadow of his prose and has yet to be afforded extensive critical attention. Working on what was to be his last novel, Sebald appears to have devoted more time to poetry than previously, which resulted in several publications: For Years Now (2001), a collection of micropoems juxtaposed with images by the British painter Tess Jaray, and Unerzählt (2003), a set of similar poems in German, published together with etchings by the artist Jan Peter Tripp. The present article takes as its point of departure the observation that these two books overlap substantially – many of the poems exist in several versions none of which can be said to be the definitive one – and attempts to interpret a selection of poems with a particular view to their material, linguistic and intermedial particularities. Using the concept of differential poetry, a term coined by Marjorie Perloff, it asks what meanings may emerge from Sebald’s sparse verses when the subtle variations between the different versions – caused by versification, typography, translation, and word-and-image interplay – are brought to the fore. 

  • 30.
    Englund, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Jörngården, AnnaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Okonstlad konst ?: Om äkthet och autenticitet i estetisk teori och praktik2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att säga om någonting att det är äkta, genuint eller autentiskt innebär för de allra flesta en positiv värdering. Detta gäller inte minst på estetikens område: konstverk och kulturyttringar som tillskrivs dessa egenskaper står på ett eller annat sätt högt i kurs. Sådana omdömen signalerar att det som diskuteras inte är falskt, förvanskat eller manipulativt – kort sagt, att det är konst som inte är konstgjord eller konstlad. Men vad, mer exakt, kan autenticitet betyda i estetiska sammanhang? Är det möjligt att uppnå någonting alltigenom genuint, och vad skulle detta i så fall innebära?

    Texterna i denna bok, vars författare kommer från en mängd olika estetiska discipliner, spänner över hela den västerländska kulturhistorien: från antiken och renässansen via romantiken till modernismen och samtiden. De estetiska objekt och praktiker som diskuteras inkluderar inte bara litteratur, bildkonst och musik, utan även foto, modekollektioner, plastikkirurgi, rättegångar, fiktiva bloggar och konserverade djurkroppar. Tillsammans ger de tretton bidragen en rik och mångfacetterad bild av vad autenticitet kan vara – och om det kan vara – i en estetisk kontext.

  • 31.
    Englund, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Jörngården, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Äkta, genuint, autentiskt: en inledning2011In: Okonstlad konst?: Om äkthet och autenticitet i estetisk teori och praktik / [ed] Axel Englund & Anna Jörngården, Lindome: Brutus Östlings Bokförlag Symposion AB , 2011, p. 7-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Englund, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Olsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Introduction: Twentieth-Century Ruptures of Location and Locution2013In: Languages of Exile: Migration and Multilingualism in Twentieth-Century Literature / [ed] Axel Englund, Anders Olsson, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2013, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Englund, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Olsson, AndersStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Languages of Exile: Migration and Multilingualism in Twentieth-Century Literature2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Languages of Exile examines the relationship between geographic and linguistic border crossings in twentieth-century literature. Like no period before it, the last century was marked by the experience of expatriation, forcing exiled writers to confront the fact of linguistic difference. Literary writing can be read as the site where that confrontation is played out aesthetically – at the intersection between native and acquired language, between indigenous and alien, between self and other – in a complex multilingual dynamic specific to exile and migration.The essays collected here explore this dynamic from a comparative perspective, addressing the paragons of modernism as well as less frequently studied authors, from Joseph Conrad and Peter Weiss to Agota Kristof and Malika Mokeddem. The essays are international in their approach; they deal with the junctions and gaps between English, French, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Swedish and other languages. The literary works and practices addressed include modernist poetry and prose, philosophical criticism and autobiography, DADA performance, sound art and experimental music theatre. This volume reveals both the wide range of creative strategies developed in response to the interstitial situation of exile and the crucial role of exile for a renewed understanding of twentieth-century literature.

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