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  • 1.
    Alberti, Benjamin
    et al.
    Framingham State University, USA.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Gender, Feminist, and Queer Archaeologies: USA Perspective2014In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2014, p. 2988-2997Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This entry presents a brief history of the emergence of feminism, gender, and queer in North American archaeology, which, along with the United Kingdom and Scandinavia to a lesser degree, represents the geographic origin and center of such work. The key concepts as used by archaeologists are defined; the relationship among them is explored and shown to be both problematic and productive. The place of feminism, gender, and queer within North American archaeology today is characterized and, finally, likely avenues of future research are suggested. The greatest impact of feminist, gender, and queer archaeologies has been on the authority of positivist approaches, the objectivity of interpretation, equity issues within the profession, collaborative knowledge making, and the understanding of key archaeological interpretive concepts.

  • 2.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    A Rare Analogy: Contemporary Cremation Practices2009In: On the Threshold: Burial Archaeology in the Twenty-first Century / [ed] Back Danielsson, I.-M., Gustin, I., Larsson, A., Myrberg, N. and Thedéen, S., Stockholm: Stockholm Unviersity , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents four different examples of how studies of contemporary cremation practices are an important aspect of archaeological research, both as a focus of archaeological research into the recent and contemporary past and as a source of analogy and/or anti-analogy in the interpretation of prehistoric mortuary practices. I show that archaeology contributed in a most direct way to the introduction of modern cremations in Sweden, that an archaeological analysis may be made of the architecture of death, and that the very cremation act of today may be fruitfully contrasted to that of Late Iron Age Scandinavia. Lastly, I discuss the significance of the concepts of the body, identity and person.

  • 3.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Allmän arkeologi.
    Bodies and Identitities in Late Iron Age Scandinavia2008In: Prehistoric Europe.: Theory and Practice., Wiley-Blackwell , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Engendering Performance in the Late Iron Age1999In: Current Swedish Archaeology, Vol. 7, p. 7-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Go Figure!: Creating Intertwined Worlds in the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 550–1050)2010In: Anthropomorphic and Zoomorphic Miniature Figuresin Eurasia, Africa and Meso-AmericaMorphology, materiality, technology, function and context: Materiality, technology, function and context / [ed] Dragos Gheorghiu and Ann Cyphers, Oxford: Archaeopress , 2010, p. 79-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Scandinavian gold foil figures from the early part of the Late Iron Age (AD 550–1050). The author presents two major points of interest that have been neglected in previous research. The first highlights how the manipulations the figures have undergone must be taken into consideration, which is accomplished with the help of theatre theory, semiotics and anthropology. The second places an emphasis on how the context from which the figures have been retrieved must be analysed. Consequently, from the example of a ceremonial building at Uppåkra, Sweden, it is contended that the figures were made by artisans/smiths that, apart from expertly making the figures, also acted as ritual specialists when the structure was built or inaugurated. As such, they were responsible for depositing specific figures in particular, designated and pivotal places that needed protection or other ritual treatment. The gold foil figures further highlight the intertwinement between subject and object, human and nonhuman, as well as between the divine and the mundane. Therefore they contribute significantly to discussions on materiality.

  • 6.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Hagerman, M. Försvunnen värld: Om den största arkeologiska utgrävningen någonsin i Sverige2011In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Hemdrup-staven – ett nytt tolkningsförslag2001In: Fornvännen, p. 73-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Härjad hög i Hallunda.: Arkeologisk undersökning av anläggning 34 från yngre järnålder på gravfält RAÄ 75, Hallunda, Botkyrka sn, Södermanland.2000Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Ingenious Ignition: “Flame, I’m gonna live forever” and other movie rhythms shaking Late Iron Age bodies on the road2003In: Scandinavian archaeological practice – in theory: Proceedings from the 6th Nordic TAG, Oslo 2001, 2003, p. 40-57Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Liten lurifax i Lejre2010In: Arkaeologisk Forum, ISSN 1399-5545, no 22, p. 30-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den lilla figurin som återfanns i Lejre år 2009 utropades genast till att vara en man och dessutom asaguden Oden. Men stämmer det? Kan arkeologer verkligen vara säkra på att den vikingatida danska miniatyrfiguren är man och att det är Oden? I denna artikel diskuteras vilka konsekvenser enkla kategoriseringar får för vår förståelse av såväl förhistoria som nutid. Dessutom ges förslag till alternativa sätt att närma sig figurinen.

  • 11.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Masking Moments: The Transitions of Bodies and Beings in Late Iron Age Scandinavia2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores bodily representations in Late Iron Age Scandinavia (400–1050 AD). Non-human bodies, such as gold foil figures, and human bodies are analysed. The work starts with an examination and deconstruction of the sex/gender categories to the effect that they are considered to be of minor value for the purposes of the thesis. Three analytical concepts – masks, miniature, and metaphor – are deployed in order to interpret how and why the chosen bodies worked within their prehistoric contexts.

    The manipulations the figures sometimes have undergone are referred to as masking practices, discussed in Part One. It is shown that masks work and are powerful by being paradoxical; that they are vehicles for communication; and that they are, in effect, transitional objects bridging gaps that arise in continuity as a result of events such as symbolic or actual deaths.

    In Part Two miniaturization is discussed. Miniaturization contributes to making worlds intelligible, negotiable and communicative. Bodies in miniatures in comparison to other miniature objects are particularly potent. Taking gold foil figures under special scrutiny, it is claimed that gold, its allusions as well as its inherent properties conveyed numinosity. Consequently gold foil figures, regardless of the context, must be understood as extremely forceful agents.

    Part Three examines metaphorical thinking and how human and animal body parts were used in pro-creational acts, resulting in the birth of persons. However, these need not have been human, but could have been the outcomes of turning a deceased into an ancestor, iron into a steel sword, or clay into a ceramic urn, hence expanding and transforming the members of the family/household. Thus, bone in certain contexts acted as a transitional object or as a generative substance.

    It is concluded that the bodies of research are connected to transitions, and that the theme of transformation was one fundamental characteristic of the societies of study.

  • 12.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Materials of affect: Miniatures in the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (550-1050 AD)2013In: Archaeology After Interpretation: Returning Materials to Archaeological Theory / [ed] Benjamin Alberti, Andrew Meirion Jones, Joshua Pollard, Walnut Creek, Ca: Left Coast Press Inc., 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Scandinavian gold-foil figures—small human-like figures hammered or cut out of thin foil—from the early part of the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 550—1050) from a relational perspective. Earlier interpretations largely approach them as symbols and representations, which downplays their practical or performative role and results in static or embalmed objects. In this paper I discuss the affective dimensions of the figures, as well as some of the myriad rhizomatic relations that were generated through the processes of manufacture, manipulation, and visual encounter. I will argue that during the Late Iron Age in Scandinavia certain human beings and gold-foil figures were ontological equivalents, and that gold-foil figures go far beyond our contemporary understanding of representations.

  • 13.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Much Ado about Nothing?: Gender Research in Journals during the last 30 Years within Archaeology2012In: To Tender Gender: The Pasts and Futures of Gender Research in Archaeology / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Susanne Thedéen, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, p. 17-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper accounts for the extent to which gender research is represented in leading archaeological journals throughout the 1980s to the present through the database Arts & Humanities Citation Index (ISI). The paper regards gender research as including gender, feminisms, masculinities, queer, intersectionality and embodiment. It is concluded that gender research, despite its alleged significance and progress in later years, is substantially marginalized within mainstream archaeology. Comparisons are also made between gender archaeology and mainstream archaeology and differences between the two are discussed. The paper further addresses current research trends within the humanities placing an increased emphasis on publications in leading peer-reviewed journals. Since the paper shows that gender research is poorly represented in such periodicals the author urges archaeologists interested in gender to publish in these journals.

  • 14.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Norsborg och Skrävsta i Botkyrka.: Makt i monument och materiell kultur.1998In: Aktuell arkeologi VI, Stockholms universitet , 1998, p. 31-40Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Om Pettersson, samiska trummor och Hitlers bunker. Bland annat.2000In: Texter om arkeologisk kulturmiljövård, Göteborgs universitet , 2000, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Presenting the past: On archaeologists and their influence on modern burial practices2011In: Mortality, ISSN 1357-6275, E-ISSN 1469-9885, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 98-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper demonstrates how antiquarians and archaeologists have influenced the burial practices of their times. They have encouraged the re-invention of prehistoric monuments in contemporary burial practices and also been involved in introducing the practice of modern cremation. Whereas antiquarians encouraged the upper-class stratum of society to reuse prehistoric material culture, their nineteenth century successors, archaeologists, turned to another audience. By focussing in greater detail on the earliest archaeologists and their endeavours to make archaeology a subject of public interest, it is revealed how they facilitated the re-invention of prehistoric material culture. For instance, bautas (a prehistoric memory stone for a deceased) became popular in the late nineteenth century, and it was also a category of sepulchral objects that the wealthier working class could afford. Hereby it is further shown how archaeology is an integral part of society, and not, as commonly argued within the history of archaeology, a discipline which in its interpretation of prehistory is influenced from a societal ‘outside’.

  • 17.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Review of “Prehistoric Pictures”2006In: Fornvännen, p. 45-47Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Review of the book “The Excavations at Wijnaldum. Reports on Frisia in Roman and Medieval Times”2002In: FornvännenArticle, book review (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sense and Sensibility: Masking Practices in Late Iron Age Boat-Graves.2010In: Making Sense of Things.: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception. / [ed] Fahlander, Fredrik and Kjellström, Anna, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University , 2010, 400, p. 121-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish boat-graves, especially those from Valsgärde and Vendel, have been the subject of many investigations and extensive research since their discoveries in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (e.g. Stolpe & Arne 1912; Arwidsson 1942, 1954, 1977; Lindqvist 1950; Herschend 1997, 2003; Seiler 2001, Schönbäck 2002; Norr (ed.) 2008). The helmets retrieved from these burials are the focus of this paper, and these have been analysed with particular consideration for their role in sensory engagement – both for the person wearing the helmet and for those experiencing it from the outside.

    The paper starts off with a short presentation of the boat-graves and the helmets therein, after which follows an equally short introduction of masking practices and the significance of masking practices during the Late Iron Age in Scandinavia. A more detailed discussion of the helmets of the boat-graves and their connection with sensual activities, the main theme of the paper, follows. Finally, a broader interpretation of the boat-graves themselves is offered and, lastly, conclusions are presented.

  • 20.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The Rape of the Lock: Or a Comparison between Miniature Images of the Eighth and Eighteenth Centuries2012In: Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Fredrik Fahlander, Ylva Sjöstrand, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, p. 29-49Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Scandinavian gold foil figures from the early part of the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 550-1050) as well as miniature portrait pendants of the eighteenth century. The paper examines the possibility of comparing the two categories of objects, and what may be gained by contrasting historic and prehistoric images. The comparison is made through using Mitchell’s concept meta-picture as a theoretical tool. It is highlighted that the relationality between image and beholder is decisive for how respective objects were comprehended and treated. However, despite the fact that the two analyzed materials were part of different scopic regimes and regimes of practice, they share vitalistic and/or animistic characteristics.

  • 21.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    (Un)Masking Gender: Gold Foil (Dis)Embodiments in Late Iron Age Scandinavia2002In: Thinking Through the Body, 2002Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fahlander, FredrikStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.Sjöstrand, YlvaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pictorial and visual elements are special types of archaeological data that transgress boundaries: between us and the past and between the material and immaterial. Traditionally, images have been discussed in terms of what they represent, mean or symbolize. In this volume, the authors explore other ways in which images aect and engage the beholder and the modes in which they are entangled in past worlds. The articles comprise examples from various regions and time periods and include a diverse array of topics including northern European rock art of the Neolithic and Bronze Age, anthropomorphic aspects of ceramic pots and figures in gold, erotic themes on children’s burial vessels, and nineteenth-century rock art created by quarantined sailors in Australia.

  • 23.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sjöstrand, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Imagery beyond Representation2012In: Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Fredrik Fahlander, Ylva Sjöstrand, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Gustin, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Larsson, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Thedéen, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Preface2009Other (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gustin, IngridStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Larsson, AnnikaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Thedéen, SusanneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.Myrberg, NanouschkaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    On the Threshold: Burial Archaeology in the Twenty-first Century2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Strassburg, Jimmy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sanning och konsekvens. Synvinklat om vi och dom. Nu och då.1998In: Nordisk Museifestival 1998 i Stavanger, 1998, p. 42-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Thedéen, Susanne
    Gender Questions2012In: To Tender Gender: The Pasts and Futures of Gender Research / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Susanne Thedéen, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, p. 9-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Thedéen, Susanne
    To Tender Gender: The Pasts and Futures of Gender Research in Archaeology2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Almost thirty years have passed since gender studies entered archaeological discourse in earnest. What is the current status of gender research? One of the aims of this book is to contribute to answering this and other related questions. Another is to shed some light on the pasts and possible futures of gender research. Contributions deal with publication statistics in journals over the last thirty years, neo-realist discussions of Mayan body-politic, intersectional analyses of current Swedish museum exhibitions and Viking Periodbox brooches, masculinities in practice at a cultural heritage site, Viking period bodily abilities and disabilities and experiments regarding how once-lived bodies and lives may be materialized.

  • 29.
    Back-Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Gustin, IngridStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Larsson, AnnikaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Myhrberg, NanouschkaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.Thedéen, SusanneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Döda personers sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck2009Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
1 - 29 of 29
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