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  • 1. Rystedt, Hans
    et al.
    Sjöblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Realism, authenticity, and learning in healthcare simulations: rules of relevance and irrelevance as interactive achievements2012In: Instructional science, ISSN 0020-4277, E-ISSN 1573-1952, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 785-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because simulators offer the possibility of functioning as authentic representations of real-world tasks, these tools are regarded as efficient for developing expertise. The users' experience of realism is recognised as crucial, and is often regarded as an effect of the similarity between reality and the simulator itself. In this study, it is argued that simulation as a realistic and relevant activity cannot be predesigned but emerges in the interaction between the participants, the simulator, and the context. The study draws on interaction analysis of video data from medical training. The aim is to contrast the use of two different simulators to explore the requirements needed to establish and maintain simulations as authentic representations of clinical practice. Irrespective of the realism of the simulator, glitches in the understanding of the simulation as work-related activity appear and are bridged by participants. This regularly involves an orientation to the relevant similarities with work and, simultaneously, the ruling out of irrelevant dissimilarities. In doing so, the participants rely on established professional practices to construe the situation. Moreover, the realism of the simulation is maintained through the participants' mutual orientation to the moral order of good clinical practice and a proper simulation. It is concluded that the design of simulation activities needs to account for the possibilities of participants understanding the specific conditions of the simulation and the work practices that the simulation represents. Learning to simulate is thus something that needs further attention in its own right.

  • 2.
    Sjöblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Killing Digital Children Design, Discourse, and Player Agency2015In: Dark Side of Game Play: Controversial Issues in Playful Environments / [ed] Torill Elvira Mortensen, Jonas Linderoth, Ashley A.M. Brown, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 67-81Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Sjöblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Datorspel och socialt samspel2013In: Fritidshemmets didaktik / [ed] Ann S. Pihlgren, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 1, p. 189-236Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Sjöblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Disputes, stakes, and game involvement: facing death in computer gaming2012In: Disputes in everyday life: social and moral orders of children and young people / [ed] Susan Danby, Maryanne Theobald, Bingley U.K.: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2012, p. 377-406Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Sjöblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Participant categorizations of gaming competence: ‘Noob’ and ‘imba’ as learner identities2012In: Identity, Community, and Learning Lives in the Digital Age / [ed] Ola Erstad, Julian Sefton-Green, Cambridge University Press, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines conversations during computer gaming, showing that players spontaneously engaged in mutual assessments in the form of blame, praise and criticism that produced a social order where some players were ranked as noobs (novices) and others as imba (experienced). This involved categorizations (Sacks 1974) of gaming where the participants assessed their own and others’ learning trajectories in terms of learner or expert identities. The findings indicate that models of learning should account for such local hierarchies. By including participants’ assessments of learner identities, our analyses extend work on communities of practice (e.g., Lave and Wenger 1991).

  • 6.
    Sjöblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Franzén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Contested connectedness in child custody narratives: Mobile phones and children's rights and responsibilities2018In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 3818-3835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New forms of information and communications technology (ICT) form parts of contemporary communication. At large, connected presence (e.g. through mobile phones) is seen as something positive that facilitates social connectedness in family life. Yet, there are also instances of what we call contested connectedness. This article analyses courtroom proceedings in child custody disputes. The analyses (from 68 audio-recorded high-conflict trials) highlight how mobile phone connectedness reshapes boundaries of public/private in post-separation family life. A number of cases were chosen to illuminate different ways in which connectedness through mobile phone contacts was contested by the child or one of the parents. Three cases document recurring ways in which children's rights and responsibilities were intertwined in complex ways in post-divorce life and how mobile phone connectedness would not offer the child new rights, yet make them more responsible for monitoring their parents' unresolved problems.

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