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  • 1. Adler, Niclas
    et al.
    Glassér, Charlotte
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    A collaborative research effort to bridge boundaries and support deviant youths in contemporary welfare systems.2005In: European Management Review, ISSN 1740-4754, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 88-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the challenges of introducing new approaches to the care of deviant youths in contemporary welfare systems. The specific study of early intervention programs within the area of psychosocial disturbances will be used to explore the interplay between emerging research results and the introduction of new approaches in different functionally specialized welfare carrying organizations. This paper is based on a collaborative research effort between researchers from education, psychology, psychiatry, sociology, economics and business administration and key actors from schools, police, criminal care, social security administrations, municipal health care and municipal politicians and administrative managers. The paper demonstrates that successful introduction of new coping strategies necessitates significant efforts to support the bridging of boundaries, the challenging of legacies and the learning from evidence to change established structures.

  • 2.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Hur kan man minska nyrekrytering?: Monoaminerga mekanismer kopplade till personlighet och olika former av psykosocial störningsbild, såsom missbruk och andra beteendestörningar (s. 23-27)2006Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Kopplingen mellan personlighet, biologi och social anpassning2013In: Att studera människors utveckling: Resultat från forskningsprogrammet IDA 1965-2013 / [ed] Anna-Karin Andershed, Henrik Andershed, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, p. 171-185Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    The role of impulsivity in different forms of psychosocial disturbances2008In: 16th AEP Congress: Abstract Book / [ed] Cyril Höschl, Philippe H. Robert, Elsevier, 2008, Vol. 23(Supplement 2), p. S333-S333Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade there has been an increasing interest in the role of impulsivity and aggressiveness in psychosocial disturbances. Despite scientific efforts, several aspects of the relationships between these personality features and Personality Disorders, alcohol/drug abuse, and violence are still controversial. A relevant question concerns the reciprocal relationships between impulsivity and aggressiveness, and their interaction with other “action” personality traits or temperamental traits, e.g., sensation seeking. Another controversial topic is the identification of biological and neuropsychological markers of impulsivity and aggressiveness in order to get more objective measures of these personality traits than those produced by subjects' self-reports, and to obtain a deeper understanding of the phenotypic aspects underlying impulsive and aggressive behaviours as manifested in different forms of psychosocial disturbances. Starting from these considerations, the aim is to shed some light on the implications and consequences of impulsivity for psychosocial disturbances, such as criminality, abuse, and violence. The issue will be discussed in terms of development, possible underlying factors, and attitudes, which can be particularly relevant from both forensic and prevention points of view.

  • 5.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Tidiga problembeteenden2008In: Narkotikan i Sverige - Metoder för förebyggande arbete: En kunskapsöversikt / [ed] Sven Andréasson, Östersund: Statens Folkhälsoinstitut , 2008, , p. 11p. 107-117Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Huvudpunkter i detta kapitel:

    • Impulsivitet är ett karaktärsdrag hos individer med ohämmat beteende, till exempel alkoholberoende, självmordsbenägenhet, hyperaktivitet och psykopatiska tendenser.

    • Hyperaktivt beteende, tidig impulsivitet och antisocialt beteende sammanfaller i stort med sårbarhetsindikatorer som man funnit i studier av antisocial personlighetsstörning (APD).

    • Psykopati och andra personlighetsstörningar, särskilt APD, har en hög frekvens av samtidigt missbruk.

    • Beteendeproblem och våld har visat sig starkt kopplat till riskbruk hos både pojkar och flickor.

    • Det finns ett väl etablerat samband mellan utagerande impulsiva och aggressiva handlingar och svagheter i serotoninmetabolismen i centrala nervsystemet (CNS).

    • Biologiska markörer utforskas i relation till olika beteendeproblem och personlighetsdrag för att dessa i sin tur ska kunna bli fokus i utformandet av effektiva och tidiga interventionsprogram.

    • Hela beroendekarriären ses som en dynamisk process över tid som därigenom också behöver utforskas longitudinellt.

    • Impulsivitet och andra psykopatirelaterade personlighetsdrag har betydelse för individens benägenhet att utveckla drogmissbruk.

  • 6.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Violent offending: Origins, development and consequences - some aspects.2006In: The Stockholm Criminology Symposium, Stockholm, June, 2006., 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade there has been an increasing interest in the role of impulsivity and aggressiveness in psychosocial disturbances. Despite scientific efforts, several aspects of the relationships between these personality features and Personality Disorders and violence are still controversial. A relevant question concerns the reciprocal relationships between impulsivity and aggressiveness, and their interaction with other “action” personality traits or temperamental traits, e.g., sensation seeking. Another controversial topic is the identification of biological and neuropsychological markers of impulsivity and aggressiveness in order to get more objective measures of these personality traits than those produced by subjects' self-reports, and to obtain a deeper understanding of the phenotypic aspects underlying impulsive and aggressive behaviours as manifested in violence. Starting from these considerations, the present session aims at sheding some light on the implications and consequences of impulsivity for psychosocial disturbances, such as abuse and violence. The issue will be discussed in terms of development, possible underlying factors, attitudes and consequences, which can be particularly relevant from a clinical and forensic point of view.

  • 7.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Almquist, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Beijer, Ulla
    Karolinska institutet.
    Rydelius, Per-Anders
    Karolinska institutet.
    Family psychosocial characteristics influencing criminal behaviour and mortality - possible mediating factors: a longitudinal study of male and female subjects in the Stockholm Birth Cohort2011In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, p. 756-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family psychosocial characteristics in childhood have been associated with children's development into criminal behaviour and mortality. This study explored these possible relationships and examined alcohol and/or drug use and mental problems as possible mediating factors, highlighting gender-specific patterns.

    Methods: Data from Swedish subjects born in 1953 (n = 14,294) from the Stockholm Birth Cohort study were examined. Several indicators of adverse family factors and individual problems were included in the present study. The information was derived from various data sources, covering different periods. Gender-specific associations with incidence of criminality (1966-1980) and mortality (1981-2009) were analysed using logistic regression. Furthermore, the population attributable fraction (PAF) was calculated for all variables in the fully adjusted models which were positively related to the outcome.

    Results: Overall incidence of criminality and mortality was (m/f 32.3/6.6) and (m/f 6.1/3.5), respectively. The results showed that all aspects of family psychosocial and individual problems studied were associated with criminality for both genders. Among males, individual problems seemed to partly mediate these relations, but the associations remained statistically significant. Interestingly, the PAF analysis revealed a reduction in criminality of 17.5% when individual problems with alcohol and/or drug use were considered. Among females, a significant impact of alcohol and/or drug use on the association between family psychosocial characteristics and subsequent criminality was obtained. Inclusion of father's occupational class only somewhat reduced the estimates for the genders. Concerning male mortality, father's alcohol abuse was significantly related to an increased risk. When individual criminality was accounted for, the association was substantially reduced but remained statistically significant. Among females, when adjusting for family psychosocial factors, only the association between parents' mental problems and females' mortality was significant. None of the individual problem variables managed to explain this association.

    Conclusions: Family psychosocial characteristics were associated with both subsequent criminal behaviour and mortality. These connections were partly explained by individual risk factors, especially by alcohol and/or drug use. The practical implications of the findings point to the importance of addressing the individual's alcohol and/or drug use in reducing criminal behaviour, which would also lower the mortality rates.

  • 8.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Granskaya, J
    Birath Scheffel, C
    Beijer, U
    Tsvetkova, L
    Personality characteristics and perceived health in Russian and Swedish female young adults with alcohol drinking habits2014In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 60, no Suppl., p. S64-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Johansson, Sven-Erik
    Gacono, Carl
    Alm, Per Olof
    Projective risk variables in early adolescence and subsequent disinhibitory psychopathology2008In: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, ISSN 0160-2527, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 210-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to examine early adolescent projective risk indicators for the development of antisocial behaviour as related to adult personality traits, psychopathy, and violent behaviour over the life span. Assessment data included Rorschach (Rr) ratings (at age 11–14 years), personality inventories (EPQ-I and KSP scales), and a shortened Psychopathy Check List (PCL) (administered at age 32–40 years), obtained from a group of 199 male subjects; and smoking habits (at age 36–44 years) obtained from 125 of those subjects. Results, controlled for intelligence, indicated that the high and very high risk groups, as determined by level of total Rr risk scores, were (1) significantly higher on self-rated IVE Impulsiveness, the anxiety-related KSP Muscular Tension, and nonconformity traits, as compared to the low Rr risk group — the very high risk group also scoring significantly higher on the EPQ Psychoticism scale, related to aggressiveness and cruelty; (2) higher on clinically rated PCL total sum and factor scores; and (3) they were overrepresented among Ss with subsequent violent offence, and Ss with heavy smoking habits. The results are discussed in terms of the possible usefulness of psychodynamic oriented cognitive-emotional indicators in the search for underlying mechanisms in the development of disinhibitory psychopathology.

  • 10.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Johansson, Sven-Erik
    Levander, Maria
    Alm, Per Olof
    Oreland, Lars
    Smoking habits – Associations with personality/behavior, platelet monoamine oxidase activity and plasma thyroid hormone levels2017In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 118, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to outline results from our scientific studies on the associations among childhood behavior, adult personality, and biochemical factors in smoking habits. The studies consisted of: (1) follow-up of young criminals and controls, subdivided into risk for antisocial behavior groups, based on childhood rating levels of a projective test; and adult smoking habit groups; and (2) a large group of young adults examined on the same inventories. Personality in terms of KSP and EPQ-I scale scores, controlled for intelligence, indicated that the high and very high risk groups displayed significantly higher self-rated impulsiveness, anxiety, and nonconformity, as compared to the low risk group. Further, the very high risk group subjects, found to be overrepresented among subjects with heavy smoking habits, displayed lower mean platelet MAO-B activity and higher thyroid hormone levels than the low risk group. Thus, the higher the childhood risk for antisocial behavior, the clearer the adult personality pattern making subjects more disposed for smoking appeared; and the higher smoking habits, the stronger the relationships with biochemical measures. Results are discussed in terms of possible underlying mechanisms influencing personality and smoking habits.

  • 11.
    Ahrén, Jennie C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Chiesa, Flaminia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Psychosocial determinants and family background in anorexia nervosa: Results from the Stockholm Birth Cohort Study2012In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, ISSN 0276-3478, E-ISSN 1098-108X, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 362-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the associations between psychosocial factors and family background and incidence of anorexia nervosa (AN) in a Swedish cohort.

    Method: The Stockholm Birth Cohort, SBC (N = 14,294) contains information on social background and general health in males and females, born in Stockholm 1953. Hospitalizations for AN, based on diagnoses from the ICD-8 through ICD-10, were recorded from 1969 to 2002. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to measure the association between psychosocial characteristics and family background and the risk of AN.

    Results: Higher maternal education was associated with a higher risk for hospitalization for AN. An increased risk for AN was also found among females who stated that they “often compare their future prospects with others.”

    Discussion: Although the study is based on a low number of cases, it confirms earlier findings of higher maternal education among individuals with eating disorders in similar cohorts.

  • 12.
    Ahrén-Moonga, Jennie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Mothers’ social background and risk of eating disorders in daughters [abstract]2008In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 18, no suppl. 1, p. 111-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ahrén-Moonga, Jennie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Holmgren, Sven
    von Knorring, Lars
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Personality traits and self-injury behaviour in patients with eating disorders2008In: European eating disorders review, ISSN 1072-4133, E-ISSN 1099-0968, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 268-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest in different aspects of personality and the neuropsychological basis for behaviour in eating disorder patients has increased over the last decade. The present study aims at exploring personality traits, self-injurious behaviour (SIB) and suicide attempts in a group of severely ill eating disorder patients. Patients with eating disorders (<i>N</i> = 38) and age-matched controls (N = 67) were examined concerning self-reported personality traits by means of the Karolinska scales of personality (KSP). Psychosocial history and SIB was collected from medical records. Depression was rated by means of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results indicated significantly higher anxiety-related and detachment traits in both anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) patients and higher hostility in BN patients than controls. No specific personality traits could be defined as typical for self-injurious or suicidal behaviour. The AN group was lower than the BN group on scales measuring impulsivity, guilt and anxiety. Furthermore, presence of SIB and suicide attempts was more frequent among the BN patients.

  • 14.
    Ahrén-Moonga, Jennie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    von Blixten, Nils
    Rönnelid, Johan
    Holmgren, Sven
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in severely ill patients with eating disorders2011In: Neuropsychobiology, ISSN 0302-282X, E-ISSN 1423-0224, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The underlying pathophysiology of eating disorders (ED) is dependent on complex interactions between psychological, biological and social factors. The purpose of the present study was to examine a possible increase in cytokines indicating inflammation, as measured by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in ED patients, and to explore possible relationships between cytokines and self-reported personality traits. Methods: Female patients with severe ED (n = 26) were recruited consecutively from an inpatient clinic and were compared to age-matched healthy females (n = 12). Commercial ELISA tests developed for the measurement of serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were employed. Personality traits were measured using Karolinska Scales of Personality. Results: The patient group displayed increased levels of the cytokine TNF-α and a tendency towards increased IL-6 levels. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to examine possible relationships between levels of cytokines and personality traits. The results showed that IL-6 levels were positively related to both somatic and psychic anxiety and to aggression scales, such as irritability and suspicion. Increased levels of TNF-α, in turn, were significantly correlated with high scores on the depression-related anxiety scale Inhibition of Aggression. However, increased levels of cytokines in the ED group did not seem to be mainly associated with symptoms of depression. Conclusion: We cannot rule out the possibility that comorbid conditions in the group contribute to the higher cytokine values. Further studies need to explore the possible influence of cytokines on the severity of ED and whether this might be mediated or moderated by specific personality traits.

  • 15.
    Ahrén-Moonga, Jennie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Silverwood, Richard
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Association of Higher Parental and Grandparental Education and Higher School Grades With Risk of Hospitalization for Eating Disorders in Females: The Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study2009In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 170, no 5, p. 566-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eating disorders are a leading cause of disease burden amongyoung women. This study investigated associations of socialcharacteristics of parents and grandparents, sibling position,and school performance with incidence of eating disorders. Theauthors studied Swedish females born in 1952–1989 (n =13,376), third-generation descendants of a cohort born in Uppsalain 1915–1929. Data on grandparental and parental socialcharacteristics, sibling position, school grades, hospitalizations,emigrations, and deaths were obtained by register linkages.Associations with incidence of hospitalization for eating disorderswere studied with multivariable Cox regression, adjusted forage and study period. Overall incidence of hospitalization foreating disorders was 32.0/100,000 person-years. Women with morehighly educated parents and maternal grandparents were at higherrisk (hazard ratio for maternal grandmother with higher educationrelative to elementary education = 6.5, 95% confidence interval:2.2, 19.3, adjusted for parental education). Independent offamily social characteristics, women with the highest schoolgrades had a higher risk of eating disorders (hazard ratio =7.7, 95% confidence interval: 2.5, 24.1 for high compared withlow grades in Swedish, adjusted for parental education). Thus,higher parental and grandparental education and higher schoolgrades may increase risk of hospitalization for eating disordersin female offspring, possibly because of high internal and externaldemands.

  • 16.
    Ahrén-Moonga, Jennie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    von Blixen, N.
    Ronnelid, J.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Levels of cytokines (TNF-α & IL-6) and personality in patients with eating disorders2008In: European Psychiatry, Vol. 23, no Suppl. 2, p. S178-179Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Beijer, Ulla
    et al.
    Birath Scheffel, Christina
    DeMarinis, Valerie
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Male violence against women with substance abuse problems: some health aspects2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to investigate to which extent two groups of women with substance abuse problems were exposed to male violence; women with a residence (WR, n= 35) and homeless women (HW, n= 44). The sample thus included 79 women (mean age: 47.8 years), of which 91% had experienced different kinds of male violence: from former partners, male friends or acquaintances, and 71% reported “Countless occasions of violent events”.  Almost half of the women (46%) met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and HW displayed the higher risk (RR 3.78) as compared to WR. Furthermore, one-third of the abused women (26 out of 72) had been forced to commit criminal acts. Compared to the abused women without this experience, they were more likely: to be homeless, to be illicit drug addicts, to have reported parental alcohol and/or drug problems, to have witnessed domestic violence in childhood, and to have been victims of sexual abuse. Finally, the two groups significantly differed concerning ever having received treatment for mental problems, in that more WR women had received such treatment (74 % as compared to 46 %). In conclusion, it is suggested that experiences of male violence are to be considered in all different forms of treatment facilities for women with substance abuse problems.

  • 18. Beijer, Ulla
    et al.
    Scheffel Birath, Christina
    DeMartinis, Valerie
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Facets of Male Violence Against Women With Substance Abuse Problems: Women With a Residence and Homeless Women2018In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 33, no 9, p. 1391-1411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to investigate the type and extent to which women with substance abuse problems have been exposed to male violence during their lifetime, and to examine possible differences between women with a residence (WR) and homeless women (HW). The total sample included 79 women (WR, n = 35; HW, n = 44; M age = 47.8 years). Of the total sample, 72 women (91%) had experienced different kinds of male violence, 88% from former partners, and 26% from male friends or acquaintances. Of the 72 women, 71% further reported “Countless occasions of violent events,” and 36% had been forced to commit criminal acts. Abused women who had been forced to commit criminal acts were significantly more frequently found to be homeless, have reported parental alcohol and/or drug problems, have witnessed domestic violence in childhood, have been victims of sexual violence, have used illicit drugs as a dominant preparation, and have injected illicit drugs. Almost half of the abused women (46%) met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), where HW showed an almost 4-time higher risk (RR 3.78) than WR. In conclusion there is a particular vulnerability in women with substance abuse to male violence, which has an important impact on their health status. Thus, from a public health perspective, it is suggested that for those women who have experienced male violence, treatment protocols need to include both assessing and addressing the impact of such experience in relation to substance abuse as well as concomitant health concerns.

  • 19. Birath, Christina Scheffel
    et al.
    DeMarinis, Valerie
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Moods and expectancies of female alcohol drinking - an exploratory study2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 472-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaining access to information concerning mood states and expectations of change preceding a typical drinking occasion is important for understanding the trigger factors for drinking, and for alcohol abuse treatment planning. The objective of the present study was twofold: (i) to explore self-reported states of mood and expectancies preceding a typical drinking occasion vs. relations with parents and drinking outcome; and (ii) to investigate if vulnerability factors in terms of personality and health are related to severity of alcohol problems. The population consisted of 50 women attending a Swedish alcohol clinic. Semi-structured interviews were conducted. A mixed-methods design was used encompassing qualitative interview-data and quantitative data from questionnaires and medical journals. Nine out of ten patients had a diagnosis of alcohol dependence, and four out of five had parents with dependency problems. As compared to a female norm group, the patients displayed significantly higher anxiety-related traits and irritability. Moods were described by patients as mostly negative and expectancies of change were evenly distributed between reducing, enhancing or flight from feeling. An expectancy of flight when drinking was also related to a positive relation to mother. The findings pointed to the need for differentiating between coping with and expectancies of drinking. Further, a hierarchical cluster analysis resulted in two groups, indicating one group characterized by higher risk values on personality scales and more severe consequences of drinking. The contribution of a treatment design informed through a gender and culture perspective to treatment outcome was discussed.

  • 20. Birath Scheffel, Christina
    et al.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    DeMarinis, Valerie
    Hauke, Sarah
    Smallwood, Jennifer A.
    Chang, Grace
    Risky drinking women: contrasting therapeutic approaches2014In: Journal of Alcoholism & Drug Dependence, ISSN 2329-6488, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1000160-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The importance of early identification and effective treatment for risky drinking grows with the increasing rate of alcohol use by women. Objectives: This study aims to contrast treatment approaches for two samples of problem drinking women. Methods: The samples consisted of (i) 134 alcohol treatment-seeking Swedish women receiving long-term comprehensive services; and (ii) 152 US women who were not seeking treatment for alcohol but were medical outpatients with one of four conditions exacerbated by excessive alcohol use and received a brief intervention as part of a study. Data consisted of questionnaires assessing alcohol consumption, perceived stress and attitudes towards change. Results: While the treatment-seeking Swedish group drank more alcohol at the start of treatment, all women reduced their consumption of alcohol at the end of treatment/follow-up. Women who reported more stress drank more initially in both samples. Conclusion and Scientific Significance: This report contrasts two “extreme” approaches to treatment: longterm, open-ended, outpatient treatment and, time-limited, structured brief intervention for risky drinking women. Both treatment methods yielded positive results with significantly reduced drinking. Factors associated with successful outcome included the women’s attitudes toward treatment and conviction for the necessity of change in drinking habits.

  • 21. Birath Scheffel, Christina
    et al.
    Beijer, Ulla
    DeMarinis, Valerie
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Institutionen för Kvinnors och Barns Hälsa, Karolinska Institutet.
    Barn till våldsutsatta kvinnor med missbruksproblem2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med föreliggande rapport är att utifrån insamlade och bearbetade data från ursprungsprojektet 'Studie om mäns våld mot kvinnor med missbruksproblem' sammanställa resultat som speglar barns psykosociala familjesituation där modern har missbruksproblem och i många fall blivit utsatt för manligt våld av partner och/eller släkting, bekant, eller myndighetsperson. Sammanfattningsvis lyfter resultaten, avseende barnens egen ogynnsamma utveckling och den generationsöverskridande problematiken i föreliggande studie, frågan om betydelsen av tidiga interventioner riktade till barn i riskmiljöer. Detta förefaller vara av särskild vikt för att ge underbyggt stöd för aktivt handlande avseende Barns rätt i samhället enligt Barnkonventionen.

  • 22. Daud, Atia
    et al.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Department of Psychology.
    Rydelius, Per-Anders
    Resilience and vulnerability among refugee children of traumatized and non-traumatized parents2008In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, Vol. 2, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to explore resilience among refugee children whose parents had been traumatized and were suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

    Methods: The study comprised 80 refugee children (40 boys and 40 girls, age range 6–17 yrs), divided into two groups. The test group consisted of 40 refugee children whose parents had been tortured in Iraq before coming to Sweden. In accordance with DSM-IV criteria, these children were further divided in two sub-groups, those who were assessed as having PTSD-related symptoms (n = 31) and those who did not have PTSD-related symptoms (n = 9). The comparison group consisted of 40 children from Egypt, Syria and Morocco whose parents had not been tortured. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 3rd edn. (WISC-III), Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents- Revised (DICA-R), Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms checklist (PTSS), "I Think I am" (ITIA) and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) were used to assess IQ; PTSD-related symptoms; self-esteem; possible resilience and vulnerability.

    Results: Children without PTSD/PTSS in the traumatized parents group had more favorable values (ITIA and SDQ) with respect to <i>total scores, emotionality, relation to family, peer relations</i> and <i>prosocial behavior</i> than the children in the same group with PTSD/PTSS and these values were similar to those the children in the comparison group (the non-traumatized parents group). The children in the non-traumatized parents group scored significantly higher on the IQ test than the children with traumatized parents, both the children with PTSD-related symptoms and those without PTSD-related symptoms.

    Conclusion: Adequate emotional expression, supportive family relations, good peer relations, and prosociality constituted the main indicators of resilience. Further investigation is needed to explore the possible effects of these factors and the effects of IQ. The findings of this study are useful for treatment design in a holistic perspective, especially in planning the treatment for refugee children, adolescents and their families.

  • 23. Daud, Atia
    et al.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Department of Psychology.
    Rydelius, Per-Anders
    Trauma, PTSD and personality: the relationship between prolonged traumatisation and personality impairment2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 331-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with personality impairments involving externalized and internalized psychopathology. This study has explored the association between PTSD symptoms as consequences of prolonged torture experiences or early childhood trauma exposure and personality traits.

    Method: One hundred and sixty-one men were included: 36 Iraqi men refugees (mean age = 43.9, SD = 8.7) who had longstanding torture experiences as adults; 42 Swedish prisoners (mean age = 33.8, SD = 7), with early childhood trauma exposure; 31 Arab men refugees (mean age = 41.8, SD = 8.9) without self-reported torture or violence experiences; 52 non-traumatized Swedish males (mean age = 39.3, SD = 5.5). They were assessed for symptoms of PTSD or PTSD hypothetical clusters. Personality profile was assessed by the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP). Factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted and yielded three factors: externalized, internalized and avoidance domains.

    Results: Individuals who suffered prolonged torture experiences or had early childhood trauma exposure showed impaired personality profiles in internalized and externalized domains. Individuals with or without PTSD showed significant differences p < 0.05 concerning: internalized, externalized and avoidance. anova and post-hoc analysis according to Scheffé showed that the prolonged torture group > early childhood trauma exposure > nontraumatized group.

    Conclusion: Prolonged torture experiences or early trauma exposure may impair personality formation by enhancing the effects of cognitive, affective and behavioural vulnerabilities.

  • 24. DeYoung, C.G
    et al.
    Getchell, M.
    Koposov, R.A.
    Yrigollen, C.M.
    Haeffel, G.J.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Oreland, L.
    Ruchkin, V.V.
    Pakstis, A.J.
    Grigorenko, E.L.
    Variation in the catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met polymorphism associated with conduct disorder and ADHD symptoms, among adolescent male delinquents2010In: Psychiatric Genetics, ISSN 0955-8829, E-ISSN 1473-5873, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Variation in the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) has been associated with antisocial behavior in populations with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study examined whether COMT would predict antisocial behavior in a sample with high levels of behavior problems, not necessarily ADHD. In addition, because previous research suggests that COMT may be associated with ADHD in males, association between COMT and ADHD symptoms was examined. Method: This study tested whether variation in three polymorphisms of the COMT gene was predictive of symptoms of conduct disorder and ADHD, in a sample of 174 incarcerated Russian adolescent male delinquents. Results: The Val allele of the Val¹⁵⁸ Met polymorphism was significantly associated with conduct disorder diagnosis and symptoms, whereas the Met allele was associated with ADHD symptoms. Conclusion: The Val¹⁵⁸ Met polymorphism of the COMT gene shows a complex relation to behavior problems, influencing conduct disorder and ADHD symptoms in opposite directions in a high-risk population.

  • 25.
    Eklund, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Alcohol use and patterns of delinquent behaviour in male and female adolescents2009In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 607-614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The overall aim was to study patterns of delinquent behaviour in relation to adolescent alcohol use. The more specific aims were to examine whether alcohol use varied between groups of adolescents with different patterns of delinquent behaviour, and to explore whether the association between delinquent behaviour patterns and alcohol use was similar for males and females. Methods:The participants were male (n = 406) and female (n = 532) adolescents in the eighth grade (age 14 years) in a medium-sized city of Sweden. We used information about self-rated alcohol use and different types of delinquent behaviour. Results: The results revealed that the occurrence of excessive alcohol use and drunkenness varied between groups of adolescents with different delinquency patterns, and that the associations between alcohol use and patterns of delinquent behaviours were relatively similar for males and females. Adolescents with patterns characterized by more serious non-violent delinquency or by violent delinquency reported the highest occurrence of alcohol use and frequency of drunkenness. Adolescents with well-adjusted behaviour or occasional minor delinquency were less likely to report drinking large amounts of alcohol or to the point of feeling drunk. Conclusions: The present results further emphasize the importance of distinguishing between different offender groups when examining the relationship between delinquent behaviour and associated problems, such as excessive alcohol use.

  • 26.
    Eklund, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Alm, P.O.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Monoamine Oxidase Activity and Tri-Iodothyronine Level in Violent Offenders with Early Behavioural Problems2005In: Neuropsychobiology, ISSN 0302-282X, E-ISSN 1423-0224, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 122-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus is on evaluating the relationships between early behavioural problems and biochemical variables at adult age and their significance for early criminality and violent behaviour in a life perspective. In the present study, using prospective longitudinal data, a sample of males with a history of early criminal behaviour and male controls (n = 103) were investigated concerning (1) teacher-rated behaviours at age 11–14 years; (2) platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity and tri-iodothyronine (T3) level at adult age; (3) registered early criminality (11–14 years); (4) records of violent offending up to age 35 years, and (5) interview data on smoking. The main finding was that a combined risk level pattern of low MAO activity and high T3 level was found significantly more frequently than expected in violent offenders with an early behavioural risk pattern. Furthermore, there was a significant interaction effect between early attention difficulties and smoking on MAO activity, as well as an effect by smoking on MAO activity. The findings are discussed in terms of the possible influence of biological vulnerability to certain behaviours, which in combination with possible childhood stress, enhance the risk for antisocial behaviours and subsequent violence.

  • 27.
    Eklund, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Freidenfelt, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Delinquent behaviour patterns in adolescence: Development and associated personality traits2011In: Personality and Mental Health, ISSN 1932-863X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 165-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined subgroups of delinquent adolescents and the short-term development of delinquency and personality traits characterizing these subgroups. Participants were girls and boys examined at the beginning of the 8th grade and followed up at the end of the 9th grade (n = 901). Four delinquency subgroups were identified for boys and for girls on both occasions, primarily characterized by well-adjusted behaviour, minor delinquency, serious delinquency or violent delinquency. The findings indicated that most adolescents displaying a certain delinquency pattern in 8th grade displayed a similar delinquency pattern in 9th grade. However, boys and girls involved in minor delinquency, and boys involved in violent delinquency, were more likely than expected to develop serious delinquency over time, indicating a progression towards more serious and versatile delinquency. Delinquent adolescents were in general more disinhibited, less adjusted and conforming, and more aggressive than well-adjusted adolescents, whereas boys in the serious delinquency subgroup and girls in the violent delinquency subgroup also were characterized by somatic anxiety. The findings support making a distinction between antisocial behaviour subgroups and indicate some personality traits associated with certain subgroups of delinquent adolescents.

  • 28.
    Eklund, Jenny M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Personality Characteristics as Risk Indications of Alcohol Use and Violent Behavior in Male and Female Adolescents2005In: Journal of Individual Differences, ISSN 1614-0001, E-ISSN 2151-2299, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 63-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focused on personality characteristics in adolescent boys (n = 414) and girls (n = 552) in 8th grade with self-reported violent behavior and risky alcohol use. Adolescents with indications of violent behavior and/or risky alcohol use, compared to others, were generally more impulsive, had a stronger need for change and action, were less adjusted and socially conforming, as well as more aggressive. The findings pointed toward a clustering of problem behaviors. Furthermore, adolescents with a combination of violent behavior and alcohol use had more pronounced personality scores than subjects who reported only one of these behaviors. The main finding was that among girls these behaviors appeared to be associated with more deviant levels of the personality characteristics in focus.

  • 29.
    Eklund, Jenny M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Stability of and Change in Criminal Behavior: A Prospective Study of Young Male Lawbreakers and Controls2006In: International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, ISSN 1499-9013, E-ISSN 1932-9903, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 83-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With Moffitt's developmental typology of antisocial behavior as a starting point, the general aim of the study was to investigate the stability of and change in criminal behavior from early adolescence to early adult age. The purpose was also to explore the role of individual, family, peer and school related risk factors in the development of criminal behavior. The study was based on data from the prospective longitudinal research project ‘Young Lawbreakers as Adults’, in which a group of adolescent male lawbreakers and controls were followed from the 1960s into the 1990s. The results were in favor of a distinction between adolescencelimited and persistent criminality, and supported the suggestion of a common set of risk factors dimensionally related to offending, rather than trajectory-specific risk factors. The findings indicated that, in addition to these common risk factors, early attention deficits and manifestations of aggression might be of specific importance to persistent criminality.

  • 30. Freidenfelt, Jenny
    et al.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Exploring Adult Personality and Psychopathy Tendencies in Former Childhood Hyperactive Delinquent Males2007In: Journal of Individual Differences, ISSN 1614-0001, E-ISSN 2151-2299, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is on (1) the possible influence of childhood hyperactive behavior on adult psychopathy, and (2) how adult, clinically rated, psychopathy tendencies are related to self-reported personality. The sample comprised 152 male subjects, including young lawbreakers (n = 98) and controls (n = 54), prospectively studied over their lifetime. Ratings of childhood behavior were obtained from a psychiatrist and data on adult personality (using the Karolinska Scales of Personality and a shortened form of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and psychopathy were obtained using the Psychopathy Check List (PCL). Subjects with high PCL as adults (n = 36) scored higher than low PCL subjects (n = 116) on the majority of the personality dimensions studied, even when controlling for criminality. Former childhood hyperactive subjects (n = 26) displayed higher impulsivity and hostility than nonhyperactive subjects (n = 126) when criminality was controlled for. Among the high PCL group subjects there was an overrepresentation of childhood hyperactive males. They displayed significantly higher impulsivity and verbal aggression than their respective nonhyperactive counterparts and were characterized by extreme scores on several psychopathy-related personality scales. Further, there was a significant interaction effect between hyperactivity and PCL on the narrow/noninclusive form of impulsivity. The findings of the present personality-based approach were in favor of childhood hyperactivity being crucial as a risk indicator in the development of psychopathic tendencies.

  • 31.
    Freidenfelt Liljeberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Eklund, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Väfors Fritz, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Poor school bonding and delinquency over time: Bidirectional effects and sex differences2011In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between poor school bonding and delinquency has only been partly addressed in earlier research. Using a longitudinal design, the objective of our study was to investigate possible bidirectional effects and sex differences between adolescents’ experienced school bonding and self-rated delinquency over time. A total of 788 adolescents (353 boys and 435 girls) were investigated by questionnaire at age 14 and 16. Poor school attachment and commitment as well as poor teacher attachment were found to be stronger determinants of delinquency for males than for females. Delinquency predicted poor school commitment for both boys and girls, and poor school attachment for girls, thus indicating bidirectional effects over time and sex differences in some of the bidirectional effects. The study concludes that the delinquency propensity of adolescent boys may be affected by all school bonding dimensions, whereas for girls it is their relationship with their teachers that is of significance.

  • 32.
    Grigorenko, Elena L.
    et al.
    Yale University.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Personality, intelligence, and somatic and mental health disturbances in a time of societal change: A study of Russian adults2010In: Journal of Russian and East European Psychology, ISSN 1061-0405, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 5-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates the connections between personality and intelligence and somatic and mental (externalizing) health disturbances in a sample of 752 Russian adults, who participated in the study during the societal turmoil of the 1990s. Given the degree of societal instability during that period, and the heightened rates of health problems, crime, and alcohol abuse, we hypothesized that the predictive links between personality and intelligence would be mediated by the perceived impact of the societal change and moderated by demographic variables such as gender, education, marital status, and age. The pattern of results differs for various outcome variables, but, in general, the results confirm, although only partially, the presence of both mediation and moderation by other variables in considering the connections between personality, intelligence, and somatic and mental health outcomes.

  • 33. Grigorenko, Elena L.
    et al.
    DeYoung, Colin G.
    Eastman, Maria
    Getchell, Marya
    Haeffel, Gerald J.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Koposov, Roman A.
    Oreland, L.ars
    Pakstis, Andrew J.
    Ponomarev, Oleg A.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav V
    Singh, Jay P.
    Yrigollen, Carolyn M.
    Aggressive behaviour, related conduct problems, and variation in genes affecting dopamine turnover2010In: Aggressive Behavior, ISSN 0096-140X, E-ISSN 1098-2337, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 158-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of dopamine-related genes have been implicated in the etiology of violent behavior and conduct problems. Of these genes, the ones that code for the enzymes that influence the turnover of dopamine (DA) have received the most attention. In this study, we investigated 12 genetic polymorphisms in four genes involved with DA functioning (COMTMAOA and MAOB, and DβH) in 179 incarcerated male Russian adolescents and two groups of matched controls: boys without criminal records referred to by their teachers as (a) “troubled-behavior-free” boys, n=182; and (b) “troubled-behavior” boys, n=60. The participants were classified as (1) being incarcerated or not, (2) having the DSM-IV diagnosis of conduct disorder (CD) or not, and (3) having committed violent or nonviolent crimes (for the incarcerated individuals only). The findings indicate that, although no single genetic variant in any of the four genes differentiated individuals in the investigated groups, various linear combinations (i.e., haplotypes) and nonlinear combinations (i.e., interactions between variants within and across genes) of genetic variants resulted in informative and robust classifications for two of the three groupings. These combinations of genetic variants differentiated individuals in incarceration vs. nonincarcerated and CD vs. no-CD groups; no informative combinations were established consistently for the grouping by crime within the incarcerated individuals. This study underscores the importance of considering multiple rather than single markers within candidate genes and their additive and interactive combinations, both with themselves and with nongenetic indicators, while attempting to understand the genetic background of such complex behaviors as serious conduct problems.

  • 34. Grigorenko, Elena L.
    et al.
    DeYoung, Colin G.
    Getchell, Marya
    Haeffel, Gerald J.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Department of Psychology.
    Koposov, Roman A.
    Oreland, Lars
    Pakstis, Andrew J.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav V.
    Yrigollen, Carolyn M.
    Exploring interactive effects on genes and environments in etiology of individual differences in reading comprehension2007In: Development and Psychopathology, ISSN 0954-5794, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 1089-1103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is established that reading and reading-related processes are heritable; genes thus play an important role in the foundation of individual differences in reading. In this article, we focus on one facet of reading–comprehension. Comprehension is a higher order cognitive skill that requires many other cognitive processes for it to unfold completely and successfully. One such process is executive functioning, which has been associated with genetic variation in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (<i>COMT</i>) gene. Genotypes and haplotypes of four single nucleotide polymorphisms in <i>COMT</i> were investigated in 179 incarcerated adolescent delinquents. Four hierarchical logistic regression models predicting the presence/absence of comprehension difficulties were fitted to the data; genetic variation in <i>COMT</i> and the presence/absence of maternal rejection were investigated as main effects and as effects acting interactively. Three out of four interaction terms were found to be important predictors of individual differences in comprehension. These findings were supported by the results of the haplotype analyses, in which the four investigated polymorphisms were considered simultaneously.

  • 35. Haeffel, Gerald J.
    et al.
    Getchell, Marya
    Koposov, Roman A.
    Yrigollen, Carolyn M.
    DeYoung, Colin
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Department of Psychology.
    Oreland, Lars
    Ruchkin, Vladislav V.
    Grigorenko, Elena L.
    Association Between Polymorphisms in the Dopamine Transporter Gene and Depression: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction in a Sample of Juvenile Detainees2008In: Psychological Science, ISSN 0956-7976, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 62-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has generated examples of how genetic and environmental factors can interact to create risk for psychopathology. Using a gene-by-environment (G × E) interaction design, we tested whether three polymorphisms in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1, also referred to as SLC6A3, located at 5p15.33) interacted with maternal parenting style to predict first-onset episodes of depression. Participants were male adolescents (<i>N</i>= 176) recruited from a juvenile detention center in northern Russia. As hypothesized, one of the polymorphisms (rs40184) moderated the effect of perceived maternal rejection on the onset of major depressive disorder, as well as on suicidal ideation. Further, this G × E interaction was specific to depression; it did not predict clinically significant anxiety. These results highlight the need for further research investigating the moderating effects of dopaminergic genes on depression.

  • 36. Isaksson, Johan
    et al.
    Grigorenko, Elena L.
    Oreland, Lars
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Koposov, Roman A.
    Ruchkin, Vladislav
    Exploring possible association between D beta H genotype (C1021T), early onset of conduct disorder and psychopathic traits in juvenile delinquents2016In: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, ISSN 0940-1334, E-ISSN 1433-8491, Vol. 266, no 8, p. 771-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early onset of conduct disorder (CD) with callous-unemotional traits has been linked to low levels of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), an enzyme involved in dopamine turnover. The C1021T polymorphism in the DβH gene is a major quantitative-trait locus, regulating the level of DβH. In this study of juvenile delinquents from Northern Russia (n = 180), the polymorphism at -1021 was associated neither with early-onset CD nor with psychopathic traits. Association was found between psychopathic traits and early-onset CD, ADHD and mania.

  • 37. Lloyd, Christina
    et al.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    DeMarinis, Valerie
    Emotion Regulation and Existential Meaning-Making in Young Women with Mental Ill-Health Concerns – A Qualitative Study2016In: International Journal of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 2163-1948, E-ISSN 2163-1956, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 555553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing rates of psychiatric problems, like anxiety, worry, and anguish among Swedish youth–especially among females, are considered a serious public mental health concern. To explore psychological and existential vulnerability and needs among female youths with mental ill-health concerns, a qualitative in-depth interview study was done with a sample comprised of ten females on the waiting-list at an outpatient psychotherapy clinic. In relation to everyday life, critical events, and ultimate concerns, two areas were explored: Emotion regulation and Existential meaning-making, and their interrelations were examined. Results indicated that these areas appear to be strongly related processes in this sample, possibly due to frequent experiences of relational losses and disruptions. Such experiences, if not repaired, might fuel existential issues like fear of death, loneliness, and alienation, increasing the vulnerability for mental ill-health. Psychotherapeutic implications were discussed.

  • 38. Lloyd, Christina Sophia
    et al.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    DeMarinis, Valerie
    An Assessment of Existential Worldview Function among Young Women at Risk for Depression and Anxiety: A Multi-Method Study2017In: Archive for the Psychology of Religion/ Archiv für Religionspsychologie, ISSN 0084-6724, E-ISSN 1573-6121, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 165-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing rates of psychiatric problems like depression and anxiety among Swedish youth, predominantly among females, are considered a serious public mental health concern. Multiple studies confirm that psychological as well as existential vulnerability manifest in different ways for youths in Sweden. This multi-method study aimed at assessing existential worldview function by three factors: 1) existential worldview, 2) ontological security, and 3) self-concept, attempting to identify possible protective and risk factors for mental ill-health among female youths at risk for depression and anxiety. The sample comprised ten females on the waiting list at an outpatient psychotherapy clinic for teens and young adults. Results indicated that both functional and dysfunctional factors related to mental health were present, where the quality and availability of significant interpersonal relations seemed to have an important influence. Examples of both an impaired worldview function and a lack of an operating existential worldview were found. Psychotherapeutic implications are discussed.

  • 39. Lloyd, Christina Sophia
    et al.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    DeMarinis, Valerie
    Psychological and existential vulnerability among clinical young women: a quantitative comparison of depression-related subgroups2015In: Mental Health, Religion & Culture, ISSN 1367-4676, E-ISSN 1469-9737, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 259-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to explore psychological and existential vulnerability among clinical young women in Sweden. Females (n = 53) with depression as the most common preliminary diagnosis were investigated through an online questionnaire. Included measures were Karolinska Scales of Personality, Self-concept, Strategies to Handle Negative Emotions, Sense of Coherence, and questions pertaining to existential meaning-making, including religious/spiritual belief. The sample was divided into High (n = 35) and Low/Inter (n = 18) groups according to scores on the anxiety- and depression-related personality scale Inhibition of aggression. Using independent samples t-test, the High group showed signs of significantly higher psychological and existential vulnerability than the Low/Inter group. Salutogenic factors being (1) coming from socially and societally engaged families and (2) being in a functional existential meaning-making process. The conclusion is that vulnerabilities in the psychological and existential domains are linked, especially in individuals high on depression-like aspects of personality. However, no significant differences for religion/spirituality were found. Treatment implications were addressed.

  • 40.
    Moran, Paul
    et al.
    Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Batty, G. David
    University of Glasgow, and University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Childhood Intelligence Predicts Hospitalization with Personality Disorder in Adulthood: Evidence from a Population-Based Study in Sweden2009In: Journal of Personality Disorders, ISSN 0885-579x, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 535-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although low pre-morbid IQ is an established risk factor for severe mental illness, its association with personality disorder (PD) is unclear. We set out to examine whether there is a prospective association between childhood intelligence and PD in adulthood. Using a population-based prospective cohort study, we linked childhood IQ scores to routinely collected hospital discharge records in adulthood. Lower IQ scores were related to higher risk of being hospitalized with a PD across the full range of IQ scores, (odds ratio per one SD increase in IQ was 0.60; 95% CI: 0.49–0.75; p(trend) = 0.001). Adjusting for potential confounding variables had virtually no impact. We conclude that low childhood IQ predicts hospitalization with PD and may be an important factor in the development of PD.

  • 41. Ruchkin, V.V.
    et al.
    Koposov, R.A.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Oreland, L.
    Grigorenko, E.L.
    Platelet MAO-B, personality, and psychopathology2005In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, ISSN 0021-843X, E-ISSN 1939-1846, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 477-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates the relationships between platelet monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) activity, personality, and psychopathology (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994] diagnoses. These relationships were assessed in 178 incarcerated male juvenile delinquents. Even after controlling for smoking, the authors found that both Internalizing and Externalizing Psychopathology were negatively related to MAO-B activity. In the final reduced model, novelty seeking fully mediated the relationships between MAO-B and Externalizing Psychopathology but not between MAO-B and Internalizing Psychopathology. It was hypothesized that low platelet MAO-B activity does not directly predispose individuals to psychopathology but is related to specific personality traits, which in turn represent a vulnerability factor for psychopathology. Future studies should help clarify the nature of the relationships between personality, biological markers, and psychopathology.

  • 42.
    Ryden-Lodi, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Burk, William
    Stattin, Håkan
    Personality and Reconviction in Crime: A Three-year Follow-up Study of Male Criminal Recidivists2008In: International Journal of Forensic Mental Health, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 83-94Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Rydén-Lodi, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stattin, Håkan
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet.
    Återfallsförbrytare- vilka var det?: Några bakgrundsfaktorers inverkan på återfall i brott2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of background factors on recidivism in crime: Factors differentiating - among serious criminal male subjects - those who relapse into crime from those who quit their criminal career.

    The aim of the present study was to enlighten the criminal career, focusing on factors of importance for quitting an ongoing severe criminal career. One hundred male recidivists, aged 30-38 years and incarcerated in prisons in the region of Stockholm, Sweden, were studied. The subjects filled in a questionnaire regarding background factors, e.g., debut in crime and addiction, upbringing, values, and quality of social networks. Inclusion criteria for participating in the study were that the subject had at least three prior convictions to prison and at least a total of one year of prison served. In a follow-up three years after the release from prison, registered criminal activity was obtained and used in yielding four recidivism groups. These groups were then studied regarding differences in the collected background factors. The results indicated significant differences within certain areas between those who kept out of conviction and those who showed severe recidivism during the three year period studied. The subjects free of convictions displayed better quality in upbringing conditions and relationships, they also differred in their evaluation of the criminal lifestyle. Furthermore, they had a later and less varied debut in addiction, nor did they live with addicted partners. The results are discussed in terms of an interactional model of the crime quitting process.

  • 44. Scheffel Birath, C.
    et al.
    DeMarinis, V.M.
    Hansagi, H.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Moods and expectations relating to a typical drinking occasion for women with alcohol dependence in Sweden2008In: 16th AEP Congress: Abstract Book / [ed] Cyril Höschl and Philippe H. Robert, Elsevier, 2008, Vol. 23, p. S319-S319Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: The presentation focuses on women's drinking problems, early relations, their mood states and expectancies as important factors influencing individual patterns of drinking. The objective is two-fold: (1) to investigate states of mood and expectancies preceding a typical drinking occasion; and (2) to study possible connections between mood state, expectancies, and relation to parents versus drinking patterns.

    Methods: The population consists of 50 female alcohol patients from a Swedish clinic for women with alcohol dependence problems. Semi-structured interviews were conducted. A mixed method design was used to treat qualitative interview-data and quantitative data from questionnaires and medical journals.

    Results: Four out of five patients were children of parents with dependence problems. Moods were described by patients as mostly negative states, and expectancies showed a preference for escaping from a stressful situation or for enhancing one's own experience. About 60 % of the patients reported negative family relations, pointing to deficient parental modeling.

    Conclusions: Sweden represents a non-traditional culture with multiple role demands. Thus, it is proposed that coping characterized by the urge to escape from overwhelming pressures may be a risk factor for drinking problems in the present patient population. Combined analyses of quantitative and qualitative data will be presented and the discussion will focus on the need to develop treatment designs that include gender and cultural analyses.

  • 45. Scheffel Birath, Christina
    et al.
    Beijer, Ulla
    DeMarinis, Valerie
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Women with Substance Abuse Problems Exposed to Men’s Violence - A Public Mental Health Challenge2013In: Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy, ISSN 2155-6105, E-ISSN 1055-3835, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore self-rated physical and psychological health in two groups of women with substance misuse problems, subjected to male violence.

    Methods: An examination of the health situation for women with substance dependence being exposed to male violence during life. The study took place in a Swedish context exploring data from 35 women with housing (WwH) and 44 homeless women (HW), regarding posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, psychological and physical problems. Mann-Whitney U-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient were used to calculate differences between groups and correlations.

    Results: The proportion of women being exposed to male violence during life for the studied group was 91% (72 of 79 women; WwH 29; HW 43). It was found that the WwH had physical health problems but compared to the HW, significantly less frequent. Regarding psychological health problems, both groups were suffering from self-reported problems, most notably in variables measuring stress susceptibility and embitterment, where both WwH and HW had scores markedly above norm mean scores. The HW had overall a poorer mental health profile as compared to the WwH. The WwH still maintained a foundation in the society compared to the HW regarding housing (100/0%), and custody over their children (91/0%).

    Conclusion: The study indicated that women with substance dependence and those who are victims of male violence have major problems with both their psychological and physical health. Particularly vulnerable are the HW. Past experiences of violence that have not been processed can further aggravate the women’s health. Thus, we suggest initiating the process of asking women if they have experienced violence in order to then be able to provide appropriate treatment interventions. For the WwH, this process may lead to a prevention of serious consequences for both their housing situation and for their health.

  • 46. Scheffel Birath, Christina
    et al.
    DeMarinis, Valerie
    Stenbacka, Marlene
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Women with alcohol problems: The possible significance of personality clustering for treatment planning2011In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 207-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and Aims. Establishing subgroups in clinical practice is important for treatment planning. The aim of the study was to cluster the study group subjects according to personality traits and psychological health variables and to establish possible differences in treatment outcome in terms of: (i) drinking outcomes (gram and number of drinking days); (ii) perceived physiological health; and (iii) use of treatment resources (length of time in treatment and number of visits) among 134 treatment-seeking women with alcohol problems in a clinical context, between the two clusters obtained. Design and Methods. Data were collected from 134 consecutive women at a Swedish clinic specialised in treating women with alcohol problems. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on the basis of self-rated personality scale scores and psychological health variables. Results. Two clusters were identified: one in which the women displayed personality and psychological health scores indicating problems (Cluster 1); and another where the women showed personality and psychological health scores within the norm range (Cluster 2). Alcohol consumption rates at the start of treatment were the same in both clusters. The consumption rates were also the same at the end of treatment for the cluster, showing a significant decrease in alcohol consumption in each. The Cluster 1 women, however, had a significantly higher number of visits at the clinic, and rated the consequences of their alcohol drinking as being significantly worse than Cluster 2 women. Discussion and Conclusions. The importance of individual differences according to personality traits for treatment planning is discussed in terms of the need for variation in treatment time and methods.

  • 47. Thompson, T.M
    et al.
    Getchell, M.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Koposov, R.A.
    Oreland, L.
    Pakstis, A.J.
    Ruchkin, V.V.
    Yrigollen, C.M.
    Grigorenko, E.L.
    Genetic variation in DRD4, criminality and conduct disorder2011In: Personality and individual differences: Theory, assessment, and application / [ed] Boag, S., Tiliopoulus, N., New York: Nova Science Publishers Inc. , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personality and individual differences research is relevant to practically every facet of human existence. For instance, since theories of persons either explicitly or implicitly guide clinical work, the field contributes to discussions of understanding abnormal psychology and provides a guide for conceptualising best treatment. Additionally, the field is relevant to understanding human development across the lifespan, and our understanding of personality and individual differences impacts upon our views of socialisation and interpersonal relations. This book presents research which draws attention to the rich scientific literature that continues to emerge with respect to personality and individual differences psychology.

  • 48. Väfors Fritz, M.
    et al.
    Eklund, Jenny M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Liljeberg, J.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Quality of Life in Different Male Offender Groups – Possible Underlying Effects of Intelligence and Psychopathic Tendencies2016In: Journal of Forensic Science & Criminology, ISSN 2348-9804, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of psychopathic tendencies and intelligence on Quality of life (QoL) ratings in different male offender groups was explored. Participants were 199 Swedish males with a history of criminality at age 11-14 and matched controls from the longitudinal project Young Lawbreakers as Adults. Based on registered crimes prior to 15 years and up to 34 years of age, four criminal groups were yielded: non-criminals (NC); adolescence-limited (AL); persistent (P); and adult-onset (AO). The QoL construct consists of the following dimensions: Self-perception, Psychological health, Family, Children, Education, Work, and Finances, all self-rated at age 38-41 when also psychopathic tendencies were clinically assessed using the Psychopathy Check List (PCL). The P group reported lower QoL in all dimensions compared to the NC and AL groups and lower QoL regarding Family and Education than the AO group. When controlling for psychopathic tendencies, the group differences in QoL regarding Self-perception and Children was no longer significant. Generally, individuals with higher IQ scores rated higher QoL than individuals with lower IQ scores. IQ however did not explain the divergence in QoL between offender groups. Psychopathic tendencies are suggested to overtake the importance of group belonging regarding the QoL dimensions of Self-perception and Children.

  • 49.
    Väfors Fritz, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Rajaleid, Kristiina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Hemström, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Quality of Life - Towards an understanding of individuals with psychopathic tendencies2009In: Personality and Mental Health, ISSN 1932-8621, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives are to explore: (1) the association between psychopathy and self-rated quality of life; and (2) the possible role of childhood hyperactivity on the relationships between Psychopathy Checklist (PCL) scores and self-rated domains of Quality of Life (QoL). Male subjects with a history of criminality at age 11-14 years (n = 108) and matched controls (n = 59) from a Swedish longitudinal project were studied. Self-rated QoL domains of psychological health, family relationships and work satisfaction were dichotomized and used as dependent variables in calculations of odds ratios (ORs) with dichotomized PCL scores as the independent variable, as assessed at age 38-41. The results showed that for each of the three QoL domains, the proportion of individuals that reported dissatisfaction was significantly higher in both criminals and controls characterized by psychopathic tendencies (PT) compared with the groups with no psychopathic tendencies. Furthermore, the results revealed higher strata-specific risk of dissatisfaction among the PT individuals for two of the domains: psychological health (OR = 6.58) and work satisfaction (OR = 7.98). Childhood hyperactivity individuals were overrepresented in the PT group. However, hyperactivity did not confound the association between PCL and QoL. The results are discussed in the light of possible treatment implications.

  • 50.
    Väfors Fritz, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Ruchkin, Vladislav V.
    Koposov, Roman
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Antisocial process screening device: Validation on a Russian sample of juvenile delinquents with the emphasis on the role of personality and parental rearing2008In: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, ISSN 0160-2527, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 438-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of the present study were 1) to validate the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) in a sample of Russian juvenile delinquents; 2) to examine subgroups of delinquents with higher versus lower levels of childhood problem behaviors with respect to the APSD subscales, personality traits, and parental rearing; and 3) to attempt to replicate the previous finding that the APSD subscale measuring callous/unemotional traits can differentiate subgroups of delinquents with different precursors for problem behaviors (predominantly biological versus predominantly social). A group of 250 Russian juvenile inmates (mean age = 16.4) was examined by means of the APSD completed by the staff at the correctional institution. The inmates completed several self-reports assessing their current and childhood behavior problems, personality traits and experienced parental rearing practices. A factor structure of the APSD was obtained that is similar, albeit not identical, to that from the original studies by Frick and colleagues [Frick, P.J., O'Brien, B.S., Wootton, J.M., McBurnett, K., (1994). Psychopathy and conduct problems in children. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 103, 700–707]; [Frick, P.J., Barry, C.T., Bodin, S.D., (1999). Applying the concept of psychopathy to children: Implications for the Assessment of antisocial youth. In Gacono, C.B. (Ed), The clinical and forensic assessment of psychopathy: A practitioners guide. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum]; [Frick, P.J., Lilienfeld, S.O., Ellis, M., Loney, B., Silverthorn, P., (1999). The association between anxiety and psychopathy dimensions in children. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 27, 383–392]; callous unemotional traits in the present sample were expressed in manipulative behavior. Results further disclosed higher levels of antisocial and aggressive activities, higher levels of personality attributes such as narcissism and novelty seeking, as well as lower cooperativeness, and negatively perceived parental rearing in a subgroup with higher (versus lower) number of childhood symptoms of conduct disorder and oppositional disorder. The juvenile delinquents with higher levels as compared to lower levels of callous unemotional traits also perceived their parents as using more negative rearing strategies. The findings are discussed in terms of interactional processes between personality of the juvenile delinquents and parental rearing in the development of antisocial behavior.

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