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  • 1. Adamsson Wahren, C.
    et al.
    Byqvist, S.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Det tunga narkotikamissbrukets omfattning i Sverige 19982001Report (Other academic)
  • 2. Allamani, Allaman
    et al.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Kuenig, Hervé
    Report of an analysis of European alcohol-related cultural, social and policy interactions and their impact on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm: Deliverable 3.2, Work Package 3, Cultural determinants of alcohol policy2013Report (Other academic)
  • 3. Allamani, Allaman
    et al.
    Voller, Fabio
    Decarli, Adriano
    Casotto, Veronica
    Pantzer, Karin
    Anderson, Peter
    Gual, Antoni
    Matrai, Silvia
    Elekes, Zsuzsanna
    Eisenbach-Stangl, Irmgard
    Schmied, Gabriele
    Knibbe, Ronald A.
    Nordlund, Sturla
    Skjælaaen, Øystein
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Österberg, Esa
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Plant, Martin
    Plant, Moira
    Miller, Patrick
    Coghill, Nikki
    Świątkiewicz, Grażyna
    Wieczorek, Lukasz
    Annaheim, Beatrice
    Gmel, Gerhard
    Contextual Determinants of Alcohol Consumption Changes and Preventive Alcohol Policies: A 12-Country European Study in Progress 20112011In: Substance Use & Misuse, ISSN 1082-6084, E-ISSN 1532-2491, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 1288-1303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beginning with France in the 1950s, alcohol consumption has decreased in Southern European countries with few or no preventive alcohol policy measures being implemented, while alcohol consumption has been increasing in Northern European countries where historically more restrictive alcohol control policies were in place, even though more recently they were loosened. At the same time, Central and Eastern Europe have shown an intermediate behavior. We propose that country-specific changes in alcohol consumption between 1960 and 2008 are explained by a combination of a number of factors: (1) preventive alcohol policies and (2) social, cultural, economic, and demographic determinants. This article describes the methodology of a research study designed to understand the complex interactions that have occurred throughout Europe over the past five decades. These include changes in alcohol consumption, drinking patterns and alcohol-related harm, and the actual determinants of such changes

  • 4. Allamani, Allaman
    et al.
    Voller, Fabio
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Balance of power in alcohol policy. Balance across different groups and as a whole between societal changes and alcohol policy2012In: Alcohol Policy in Europe: Evidence from AMPHORA / [ed] Peter Anderson, Fleur Braddick, Jillian Reynolds and Antoni Gual, Barcelona: Amphora project , 2012, p. 32-42Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Edman, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The Swedish drug problem: conceptual understandingand problem handling, 1839–20112014In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 31, no 5-6, p. 503-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM – To analyse the Swedish drug question by examining dominant concepts used to portray theproblem in the years 1839–2011. Theoretically, we understand these concepts as ideological toolsthat shape the political initiatives and administrative efforts to deal with the problem. The studyis based on two kinds of source material: articles in medical journals from the years 1839–1964and public reports on vagrancy, the alcohol problem, mental health and the drug problem fromthe years 1882–2011.

    FINDINGS – During the nineteenth century and the first part of the twentieth century the drugproblem remained an individual problem handled by doctors. When the Swedish drug problemwas established as a political question from the 1960s on, it also came to disengage itself from themedical frame of understanding. Medically oriented descriptions of “dependence” and “addiction”have appeared adequate or attractive when, for example, the socially motivated coercive treatmentsolution has been discredited (as in the 1970s), when there has been a desire to connect with aninternationally accepted terminology (as in the 1990s) or when a new organisational model with astronger professional support has been on the agenda (as in the 2010s). But otherwise the socialproblem description has called for concepts that have more or less explicitly dissociated themselvesfrom speculations in physiological or psychological predispositions for substance abuse.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Mimmi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkohol- och drogförebyggande arbete på mindre arbetsplatser: en telefonintervjuundersökning med personalchefer på 445 företag i Sverige med mellan 20-99 anställda2002Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Eriksson, Mimmi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkohol- och drogtester i svenskt arbetsliv2001In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 225-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Alkohol- och drogtester i arbetslivet är fortfarande en kontroversiell och komplex fråga, femton år efter att tester först började användas i Sverige. Problematiken och oklarheterna rör såväl juridiska, sociala som etiska aspekter. Dessutom saknas utvärderingar och forskning i Sverige om huruvida alkohol- och drogtester överhuvudtaget bidrar till att uppnå de målsättningar som kopplas till dem. Tre fall har varit uppe i Arbetsdomstolen (AD), men har inte i någon högre grad klargjort de otydligheter som finns. På arbetsgivarsidan har utfallen av domsluten dock tolkats som ett klartecken till att både införa och fortsätta med tester. Denna artikel syftar till att redogöra för dagsläget och problematiken med alkohol- och drogtester. Undersökningsresultat från telefonintervjuer med personalchefer på svenska företag presenteras.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Mimmi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Osberg, Johanna
    Alcohol prevention in the Swedish workplace – who cares?2004In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 263-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we discuss what interest, and whose interest, there is in working with alcohol and drug prevention in workplaces. As the Swedish alcohol policy has weakened, alternative ways for primary prevention are sought. Public reports have pointed out the workplace as one arena for prevention that could compensate for the government's diminishing alcohol control. Will this work? What conditions are necessary in order to work successfully with these issues in a corporate environment? Several studies have suggested that there is little interest in working with prevention in workplaces, and this study supports this finding. This study involved interviews at 16 companies in Sweden with personnel managers, employees (in focus groups), union representatives, and in some cases the company's health care department. In a preliminary stage the findings verified our hypothesis that the overall interest in primary prevention in reality is not that strong. The participants in the study believed that the responsibility lies in intervention when the alcohol or drug problem has arisen, and there is really not much the company can do to prevent people from using alcohol or drugs.

  • 9.
    Fondén, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Skrinjar, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    På vems villkor?: Om möten mellan myndigeter och narkotikamissbrukare2003Report (Other academic)
  • 10. Haasen, C.
    et al.
    Prinzleve, M.
    Zurhold, H.
    Rehm, J.
    Guettinger, F.
    Fischer, G.
    Jagsch, R.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ekendahl, M.
    Verster, A.
    Composeragna, A.
    Pezous, A.-M.
    Gossop, M.
    Manning, V.
    Cox, G.
    Ryder, N.
    Gerevich, J.
    Bacskai, E.
    Casas, M.
    Matali, J.L.
    Krausz, M.
    Cocaine use in Europe - a multi-centre study: Methodology and prevalence estimates2004In: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 139-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increase in the use of cocaine and crack in several parts of Europe has raised the question whether this trend is similar to that of the USA in the 1980s. However, research in the field of cocaine use in Europe has been only sporadic. Therefore, a European multi-centre and multi-modal project was designed to study specific aspects of cocaine and crack use in Europe, in order to develop guidelines for public health strategies. Data on prevalence rates were analysed for the general population and for specific subgroups. Despite large differences between countries in the prevalence of cocaine use in the general population, most countries show an increase in the last few years. The highest rate with a lifetime prevalence of 5.2% was found for the United Kingdom, although with a plateau effect around the year 2000. With regard to specific subgroups, three groups seem to show a higher prevalence than the general population: (1) youth, especially in the party scene; (2) socially marginalized groups, such as homeless and prostitutes or those found in open drug scenes; (3) opiate-dependent patients in maintenance treatment who additionally use cocaine. Specific strategies need to be developed to address problematic cocaine use in these subgroups.

  • 11. Johansson, P.
    et al.
    Nilsson, M.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Heroindömda 17-29-åringar 19962001Report (Other academic)
  • 12. Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Lindeman, Mikaela
    Österberg, Esa
    Ahtola, Raija
    Moskalewicz, Jacek
    Welbel, Marta
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Report of previously studied European changes in the economic and physical availability of alcohol on alcohol-related harm2011Report (Other academic)
  • 13. Korf, D.J.
    et al.
    Gamella, J.F.
    Moskalewicz, J.
    O’Gorman, G.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Uhl, A.
    Wouters, M.
    Social drug research in Europe: current themes and future developments2005In: Research on Drugs and Drug Policy from a European Perspective / [ed] L. Kraus & D.J. Korf, Lengerich: Pabst Science Publisher , 2005, p. 17-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14. Lander, I.
    et al.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Rönneling, A.
    Skrinjar, M.
    Narkotikamissbruk och marginalisering, MAX-projektet, slutrapport2002Report (Other academic)
  • 15. Lenke, Leif
    et al.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Den narkotikapolitiska relevansen av narkotikarelaterade dödsfall2003In: Forskare om narkotikapolitiken / [ed] Tham, H., Stockholm: Kriminologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet , 2003, p. 53-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Lenke, Leif
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Swedish Drug Policy in the Twenty-First Century: A Policy Model Going Astray2002In: The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, ISSN 0002-7162, E-ISSN 1552-3349, Vol. 582, no 1, p. 64-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 1990s, the drug problem in Sweden stabilized in spite of a heroin wave on the European continent and in the United Kingdom. The preconditions for this control policy are discussed, as are the advantages of the Swedish drug control model with its massiveness regarding prevention, treatment, and repression. When drawing conclusions from the 1980s, focus has been placed on zero tolerance and dissociation of harm reduction activities in connection with the economic crisis that, although temporary, hit Swedish society in the 1990s. This resulted in the control policy's having a list so that preventive measures and treatment had to give in on behalf of further strengthening of the police in the drug control model. The change in focus toward an even more pronounced zero tolerance approach did not yield any visible results regarding drug use. Experimenting with drugs and heavy drug use increased considerably during the 1990s.

  • 17. Lund, Ingeborg
    et al.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Introduction2008In: Painting the Town Red: pubs, restaurants and young adults' drinking cultures in the Nordic countries / [ed] Börje Olsson & Jukka Törrönen, Helsinki: Nordic Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research (NAD) , 2008, p. 5-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkohol- och narkotikaforskning: Nuläge, behov och framtid2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Svensk alkohol- och narkotikapolitik genomgår för närvarande stora förändringar och utmaningarna för framtiden är många. Det europeiska perspektivet har blivit allt viktigare, både i fråga om problemens omfattning som i möjligheterna att forma den framtida politiken. Forskningen har en viktig roll och i denna presentation görs en genomgång av det aktuella forskningsläget och en analys av framtida forskningsbehov.

  • 19.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Cannabis' role in drawing attention to 'the drug problem' in Sweden2008In: A Cannabis Reade: Global Issues and Local Experiences: Volume I, EMCDDA, Lisbon , 2008, p. 51-68Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ett halvt sekel med narkotika: från panik och undergångsprofetior till hantering av ett vardagligt problem?2011In: Narkotika: om problem och politik / [ed] Börje Olsson, Stockholm: Norstedts Juridik , 2011, p. 15-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Fear and Curiosity: Drug Use among the General Population in Sweden2004In: European studies on drugs and drug policy / [ed] Decorte, T. and Korf, D. J., Brussels: VUB Press , 2004, p. 141-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Förändrad missbrukssituation och samhällstruktur - oförändrad narkotikapolitik?1999In: Alkohol & Narkotika, ISSN 0345-0732, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 18-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Metoder att uppskatta antalet narkotikamissbrukare1999In: Narkotikastatistik: om samhällets behov av information om narkotikautveckling : delbetänkande från Narkotikakommissionen, Stockholm: Fakta info direkt : Norstedt , 1999, p. 83-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Narkotika: om problem och politik2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Narkotikamissbruk och marginalisering2001In: Oberoende, ISSN 1102-9021, no 4, p. 9-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Narkotikaproblem och narkotikapolitik: Några nerslag i den svenska historien2001In: Alkohol & Narkotika, ISSN 0345-0732, Vol. 95, no 6, p. 87-95Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Narkotikaproblemet i Sverige: framväxt och utveckling2011In: Narkotika: om problem och politik / [ed] Börje Olsson, Stockholm: Norstedts Juridik , 2011, p. 23-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Nya historier, nya berättare?: Alkohol och alkoholpolitik i svensk press under 1990-talet2000In: Nordisk Alkohol- og narkotikatidsskrift (NAT), ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 63-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the years around 1990, several policy and economic events occurred which had significant effects on the Swedish society. In this context, critique against the welfare state grew and the traditional roles of the state and the individual were challenged. The legitimacy and efficiency of Swedish alcohol policy was also called into question. The article describes and analyses how portrayals of alcohol, alcohol problems and alcohol policies have changed during the 1990s in the Swedish press. Despite the growth of media like television and the Internet, the daily press must still be considered an important source of information and also an active constructor of reality. The analysis is based on different samples of press articles during the studied period. Special attention is paid to different actors/ narrators, their argumentation and how they perceive the individual and the state as legitimate actors and controllers of our drinking habits. The analysis shows that the dominant restrictive alcohol discourse, based on the total consumption model, public health perspectives and universal and restrictive alcohol policy measures, gradually has been challenged by a liberal discourse in which individual freedom, market liberalism and consumer perspectives are put forward as guiding principles for alcohol policies. A 'sensible drinking' perspective has seriously weakened the traditional perspective where alcohol- related problems have been situated as the legitimate foundation for policies. Finally, the ongoing redefinition of the alcohol issue also has made it possible for new narrators, for instance, business representatives, to take part in and significantly influence the alcohol discourse.

  • 29.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Reduced toolbox2002In: I kläm mellan handel och hälsa: nordisk alkoholpolitik i en global värld / [ed] Kari Paaso, Christoffer Tigerstedt, Esa Österberg, Helsinki: Social- och hälsovårdsministeriet , 2002, p. 95-96Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Reflexioner om narkotika som problem och politik: från vad till vad?2011In: Narkotika: om problem och politik / [ed] Börje Olsson, Stockholm: Norstedts Juridiska , 2011, p. 239-254Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Saving youths, jobs, profits and more: An analysis of the Swedish brewers' arguments for lower beer taxes2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has for about ten years experienced a rather dramatic transformation of its alcohol policy. One of the most significant changes is the advent and introduction of private commercial interests in the alcohol trade. Of the five previous state monopolies for production, export, import, wholesale and retail, only the retail monopoly remains. This has in a short period of time made it possible for private business interests to actively, and as a legitimate actor, participates in the public alcohol policy discourse. At present, one of the strongest claims raised by the alcohol industry in Sweden is to lower the taxes on beer. In this paper, the conflicting interests around beer taxes are analysed with special focus on how the Swedish brewers frame this issue, that is, how they describe consequences and problems attributed to the relatively high tax levels, and what they predict will happen if lower taxes were introduced. The results are discussed in context of the general alcohol policy discourse presently taking place.

  • 32.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Staging our dreams – alcohol and restaurants as pleasurable identity-constructing symbols2008In: Painting the Town Red: Pubs, restaurants and young adults' drinking cultures in the Nordic countries, Hakapaino Oy, Helsinki 2008 , 2008, p. 119-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Tungt narkotikamissbruk i Norden 1995-20002001In: Bruk, missbruk, marknad och reaktioner: narkotika i Norden 1995-2000 / [ed] Petra Kouvonen, Pia Rosenqvist, Astrid Skretting, Helsingfors: Nordiska nämnden för alkohol- och drogforskning (NAD) , 2001, p. 27-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Olsson, Börje
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Eriksson, Mimmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Steen, P.
    Dryckesmönster och självrapporterade alkoholproblem bland olika yrkesgrupper2004In: Svenska dryckesvanor och deras konsekvenser i början av det nya milleniet / [ed] Hradilova Selin, K., Stockholm: SoRAD , 2004, p. 147-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Olsson, Börje
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Nordlund, Sturla
    Järvinen, Saija
    Media representations and public opinion2000In: Broken spirits: power and ideas in Nordic alcohol control / [ed] Pekka Sulkunen, Caroline Sutton, Christoffer Tigerstedt, Katariina Warpenius, Helsinki: Nordic Council for Alcohol and Drug Research (NAD) , 2000, p. 223-240Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Olsson, Börje
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Painting the Town Red: Concluding remarks2008In: Painting the Town Red: Pubs, restaurants and young adults' drinking cultures in the Nordic countries, Helsinki: Nordic Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research (NAD) , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Olsson, Börje
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Törrönen, JukkaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Painting the Town Red: pubs, restaurants and young adults' drinking cultures in the Nordic countries2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Pubar och restauranger utgör viktiga arenor för det sociala livet och under de senaste decennierna har pub- och restaurangkulturen i de nordiska länderna expanderat. I städerna finns det ett stort utbud av pubar och nattklubbar och flera av dem försöker locka till sig unga vuxna, vilka utgör den största kundgruppen för pubarna och restaurangerna i dag.

    I denna antologi studeras restauranglivet ur flera olika synvinklar. Artiklarna diskuterar det offentliga drickandets historia i de nordiska länderna; de visar hur media har presenterat restauranger och pubar i Norge och Sverige och de ger en inblick i unga vuxnas dryckesvanor och -kulturer i de största städerna i Norden. Andra frågor som behandlas är hur väl lokala förebyggande alkoholprogram fungerat i Danmark, Finland och Sverige samt hur drickandet på allmänna platser hänger ihop med våld i Island.

    Resultaten pekar på att unga vuxna dricker för att berusa sig i samtliga nordiska länder men det finns ändå skillnader gällande graden av berusning, binge drinking och hur myndigheterna ser på de unga vuxnas dryckeskultur.

  • 38.
    Olsson, Börje
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ólafsdóttir, Hildigunnur
    Reykjavik akademi.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Introduction: Nordic traditions of studying the impact of alcohol policies2002In: The effects of Nordic alcohol policies: what happens to drinking and harm when alcohol controls change? / [ed] Robin Room, Helsingfors: Nordiska nämnden för alkohol- och drogforskning (NAD) , 2002, p. 5-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39. Prinzleve, M.
    et al.
    Haasen, C.
    Zurhold, H.
    Matali, J.L.
    Bruguera, E.
    Gerevich, J.
    Bacskai, E.
    Ryder, N.
    Butler, S.
    Manning, V.
    Gossop, M.
    Pezous, A.-M.
    Verster, A.
    Camposeragna, A.
    Andersson, P.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Primorac, A.
    Fischer, G.
    Guettinger, F.
    Rehm, J.
    Krausz, M.
    Cocaine use in Europe - a multi-centre study: Patterns of use in different groups2004In: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 147-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    The study investigates patterns of cocaine powder and crack cocaine use of different groups in nine European cities.

    DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS:

    Multi-centre cross-sectional study conducted in Barcelona, Budapest, Dublin, Hamburg, London, Paris, Rome, Vienna, and Zurich. Data were collected by structured face-to-face interviews. The sample comprises 1,855 cocaine users out of three subgroups: 632 cocaine users in addiction treatment, mainly maintenance treatment; 615 socially marginalized cocaine users not in treatment, and 608 socially integrated cocaine users not in treatment.

    MEASUREMENTS:

    Use of cocaine powder, crack cocaine and other substances in the last 30 days, routes of administration, and lifetime use of cocaine powder and crack cocaine. Findings: The marginalized group showed the highest intensity of cocaine use, the highest intensity of heroin use and of multiple substance use. 95% of the integrated group snorted cocaine powder, while in the two other groups, injecting was quite prevalent, but with huge differences between the cities. 96% of all participants had used at least one other substance in addition to cocaine in the last 30 days.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The use of cocaine powder and crack cocaine varies widely between different groups and between cities. Nonetheless, multiple substance use is the predominating pattern of cocaine use, and the different routes of administration have to be taken into account.

  • 40. Rødner Sznitman, Sharon
    et al.
    Olsson, B
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Room, R
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    A Cannabis Reader: Global Issues and Local Experiences – Perspectives on Cannabis Controversies: Treatment and Regulation in Europe. vol.12008Book (Other academic)
  • 41. Rødner Sznitman, Sharon
    et al.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    A Cannabis Reader: Global Issues and Local Experiences – Perspectives on Cannabis Controversies: Treatment and Regulation in Europe. vol.22008Book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Stenius, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD), Stockholm University, Sweden2010In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 402-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD) was established as a national research centre and department within the Faculty of Social Science at Stockholm University in 1997, following a Government Report and with the aim to strengthen social alcohol and drug research. Initially, core funding came from the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research and from the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs for several long-term projects. Today, SoRAD, with 25 senior and junior researchers, has core funding from the university but most of its funding comes from external national and international grants. Research is organized under three themes: consumption, problems and norms, alcohol and drug policy and societal reactions, treatment and recovery processes. SoRADs scientific approach, multi-disciplinarity, a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods and international comparisons was established by the centre's first leader, Robin Room. Regular internal seminars are held and young researchers are encouraged to attend scientific meetings and take part in collaborative projects. SoRAD researchers produce government-funded monthly statistics on alcohol consumption and purchase, and take part in various national government committees, but SoRADs research has no clear political or bureaucratic constraints. One of the future challenges for SoRAD will be the proposed system for university grants allocation, where applied social science will have difficulties competing with basic biomedical research if decisions are based on publication and citation measures.

  • 43.
    Sznitman Rödner, Sharon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Overview of Volume 12008In: A Cannabis Reader: Global Issues and Local Experiences: Volume 1, EMCDDA, Lisbon , 2008, p. xvii-xxvChapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 43 of 43
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