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  • 1.
    Nitharwal, Ram Gopal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schäfer, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wiseman, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sjöstrand, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kuang, Qie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ädelroth, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brzezinski, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Biochemical and structural characterization of a superoxide dismutase-containing respiratory supercomplex from Mycobacterium smegmatisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Sjöstrand, Dan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Diamanti, Riccardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lundgren, Camilla A. K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wiseman, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    A rapid expression and purification condition screening protocol for membrane protein structural biology2017In: Protein Science, ISSN 0961-8368, E-ISSN 1469-896X, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1653-1666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Membrane proteins control a large number of vital biological processes and are often medically important-not least as drug targets. However, membrane proteins are generally more difficult to work with than their globular counterparts, and as a consequence comparatively few high-resolution structures are available. In any membrane protein structure project, a lot of effort is usually spent on obtaining a pure and stable protein preparation. The process commonly involves the expression of several constructs and homologs, followed by extraction in various detergents. This is normally a time-consuming and highly iterative process since only one or a few conditions can be tested at a time. In this article, we describe a rapid screening protocol in a 96-well format that largely mimics standard membrane protein purification procedures, but eliminates the ultracentrifugation and membrane preparation steps. Moreover, we show that the results are robustly translatable to large-scale production of detergent-solubilized protein for structural studies. We have applied this protocol to 60 proteins from an E. coli membrane protein library, in order to find the optimal expression, solubilization and purification conditions for each protein. With guidance from the obtained screening data, we have also performed successful large-scale purifications of several of the proteins. The protocol provides a rapid, low cost solution to one of the major bottlenecks in structural biology, making membrane protein structures attainable even for the small laboratory.

  • 3.
    Wiseman, Benjamin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nitharwal, Ram Gopal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Fedotovskaya, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schäfer, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Guo, Hui
    Kuang, Qie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Benlekbir, Samir
    Sjöstrand, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ädelroth, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rubinstein, John L.
    Brzezinski, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Structure of a functional obligate complex III2IV2 respiratory supercomplex from Mycobacterium smegmatis2018In: Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, ISSN 1545-9993, E-ISSN 1545-9985, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 1128-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the mycobacterial electron-transport chain, respiratory complex III passes electrons from menaquinol to complex IV, which in turn reduces oxygen, the terminal acceptor. Electron transfer is coupled to transmembrane proton translocation, thus establishing the electrochemical proton gradient that drives ATP synthesis. We isolated, biochemically characterized, and determined the structure of the obligate III2IV2 supercomplex from Mycobacterium smegmatis, a model for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The supercomplex has quinol:O-2 oxidoreductase activity without exogenous cytochrome c and includes a superoxide dismutase subunit that may detoxify reactive oxygen species produced during respiration. We found menaquinone bound in both the Q(o) and Q(i) sites of complex III. The complex III-intrinsic diheme cytochrome cc subunit, which functionally replaces both cytochrome c(1) and soluble cytochrome c in canonical electron-transport chains, displays two conformations: one in which it provides a direct electronic link to complex IV and another in which it serves as an electrical switch interrupting the connection.

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