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  • 1.
    Byerley, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Africa as Laboratory and the Complexity of Epistemic Decolonisation2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Byerley, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Ambivalent Inheritance: Jinja town in search of a postcolonial refrain2011In: Journal of Eastern African Studies, ISSN 1753-1055, E-ISSN 1753-1063, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 482-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. Jinja Town in Uganda, selected as one of five centres of growth in the post-WWII era of colonial developmentism, is perennially represented in the Ugandan media as the quintessential industrial town gone off-track. This is particularly evident for the case of the African housing estates built in Jinja in the 1950s where the dominant everyday rhythm is no longer dictated by the factory siren or the monthly wage but instead is a landscape scored by multiple rhythms. By conceptually positioning these estates as inherited machines – ones still loaded with a profusion of signs and objects from the era of the modern industrial ‘refrain’ – this paper seeks both to illustrate the colonial planning rationality and to examine contemporary processes of vernacular urbanism and contestations surrounding ‘re-occupations’ of the post-colonial city. It is argued that we need to seriously question any a priori invocation of a generic ‘form’ of vernacular urbanism that is (or is not) to be prioritized over or ‘mixed’ with a Western planning cycle. Instead, the case study shows how historical and place specificities complicate the notion that the logics of place making can be unproblematically abstracted from.

  • 3.
    Byerley, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Drawing white elephants in Africa? Re-contextualizing Ernst May’s Kampala plans in relation to the fraught political realities of late-colonial rule2018In: Planning Perspectives, ISSN 0266-5433, E-ISSN 1466-4518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1945/1946, the Colonial Administration in Uganda commissioned Ernst May – planner of Das Neue Frankfurt (1926–1930) – to design the Kampala Extension Scheme and the smaller Wandegeya Development Scheme. The past decade has seen increasing scholarly interest in the neglected ‘African’ episode of Mays planning oeuvre, but this literature has not explicitly examined how May’s planning articulated with the fraught political realities of late-colonial rule. Utilizing previously undocumented archive material and a theoretical frame informed by governmentality studies, this paper examines these articulations, particularly those relating to tensions and contradictions in Colonial government arising from the would-be turning-point from indirect rule to a bio-political rationality of development and welfare. It is shown that while May’s submitted plans spoke directly to the tropes of urban improvement, African detribalization and labour stabilization, which informed the ‘turning point’ in colonial policy, May’s elaborate socio-spatial interventions and the style in which these enunciated racial difference proved unpalatable to a colonial administration stifled by the rationality of the economic domain of government, by constraints on how difference could be enunciated and by African urban politics.

  • 4.
    Byerley, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Mind the Gap! Seeking Stability Beyond the ‘Tribal’ Threshold in Late-Colonial Uganda. The Role of Urban Housing Policy, 1945-1960.2009In: African Studies, ISSN 0002-0184, E-ISSN 1469-2872, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 429-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The momentum towards a ‘developmentalist’ paradigm of colonial rule in the post-WWII Uganda Protectorate elevated the ‘Native Question’ to a new critical level. The twin imperatives of welfare and industrialisation threatened to make the ‘tribal’ categories that had erstwhile been used to ‘locate’ colonial subjects untenable and to force a crossing of the detribalisation threshold. In the context of African urban housing policy and housing provision during the period 1945-1960, the author deploys Foucault’s notions of sovereign, anatomo- and bio-power to examine the changing modalities of power deployed by the colonial state in managing a controlled transition across the tribal threshold. From sovereign technologies of power in the pre-WWII era designed to extract labour power from Africans while conserving their tribal loyalty; thence to the introduction of technologies to regenerate the still tribal African body (1945-1953); then to technologies designed to cross the tribal threshold and norm and form ‘loyal’ modern subjects (1954-1960). The article investigates and argues for the vital but always evolving role of public African urban housing both as instructional spaces for these power investments and also as spatial ‘sorting devices’ or relay points in a wider architecture for canalising movement, separating populations, and guiding loyalties. A detailed case study of Walukuba African Housing Estate in Jinja Town is used to ground this analysis as well as to examine the ‘limits’ to colonial technologies of power.

  • 5.
    Byerley, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    The Sage Companion to the City2010In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 913-914Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Byerley, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Uganda: Geography and Economy2007In: New Encyclopedia of Africa, Volume 5, Gale Cengage , 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Byerley, Andrew
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Bylund, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Stockholm Parklife: Public issues, friction zones, and displacement2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stockholm Parklife investigates alcohol consumption in urban parks and how the boundary between acceptable and unacceptable behaviour is drawn. Focus is mainly on how norms, regulation and policy create different claims on and conflicts in public spaces. Conflict around rowdy drinking behaviour in urban parks often generates proposals on alcohol free zones whose effects are not yet clear. The paper propose following this controversy over the fate of public space as an issue around which a public can form and participate in local (formal) politics. The project centers around the Stockholm inner-city parks Drakensbergsparken, Tantolunden, and Skinnarviksparken.

  • 8.
    Byerley, Andrew
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Sverige.
    Bylund, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Södertörns högskola, Sverige.
    Vad är ett bra parkliv?: Om det offentliga rummets öde, alkohol och Tanto i Stockholm2012In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stockholm Parklife investigates alcohol consumption in urban parks and how the boundary between acceptable and unacceptable behaviour is drawn. Focus is mainly on how norms, regulation and policy create different claims on and conflicts in public spaces. Conflict around rowdy drinking behaviour in urban parks often generates proposals on alcohol free zones whose effects are not yet clear. The paper propose following this controversy over the fate of public space as an issue around which a public can form and participate in local (formal) politics. The project centers around the Stockholm inner-city parks Drakensbergsparken, Tantolunden, and Skinnarviksparken.

  • 9.
    Lindell, Ilda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Norström, Jennifer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Byerley, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    New City Visions and the Politics of Redevelopment in Dar es Salaam2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the midst of widespread urban deprivation, African governments increasingly give priority to large-scale ultra-modern urban projects, intended to increase national income and propel their urban settlements onto the global stage of ‘world-class’ cities. However, such projects are often in tension with the realities of local residents. This study explores one such initiative, a redevelopment project, the Kigamboni New City, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. It discusses the vision, intentions and rationales behind the project, as well as the tensions that the plans gave rise to, as residents in the area were to be resettled or displaced to make way for the New City. It shows that the urban vision underlying the New City project took shape without taking the different realities and desires of the local residents of Kigamboni into consideration. The study discusses how residents perceived and acted upon the redevelopment plans. A local organization claiming to represent the people of Kigamboni was mainly concerned with issues of compensation and the particular interests of landholders, and seemed to marginalize women and the concerns of tenants. The difficulties surrounding implementation of the futuristic plans finally brought them to a standstill, leaving the remaining residents in a state of uncertainty about the future. The paper is based on ethnographic fieldwork, including interviews with urban planners and local residents, as well as analysis of urban plans and other relevant documents.

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