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  • 1.
    Gentens, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Manner components in Late Modern English direct speech reporting2019In: The syntagmatic properties of complementation patterns: Accommodating lexical and grammatical uses of CTP-clauses: Book of abstracts, 2019, p. 8-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the diachronic increase in manner-of-speaking verbs taking direct speech complements (e.g. babble, whisper, shout) over the course of the Late Modern English period (cf. Fanego 2012). Drawing on the list of manner-of-speaking predicates provided by Levin (1993: 204-206), it focuses on tracking the pathway of change in the Corpus of Late Modern English texts, version 3.0 (Diller et al. 2011) from mainly intransitive predicates to direct, often referred to as ‘parenthetical’, reporting predicates.

    The analysis will focus on two main questions. Firstly, it sets out to examine the degree to which the acquisition of a parenthetical direct reporting use involves the prior acquisition of other reporting patterns (e.g. cognate objects, reaction objects, indirectly reported clauses). This is important to establish the degree to which the attraction to the broader paradigm of reporting constructions (cf. Kiparsky & Kiparsky 1970; Halliday & Hasan 1976: 132) facilitates the acquisition of the direct reporting pattern. Secondly, the study analyzes how the notion of ‘discursive secondariness’ (Boye & Harder 2012) is represented in the ‘focus/modifier’ distinction of models of event lexicalization (Erteshik-Shir 2007; Rappaport Hovav & Levin 1998), and how this for the group of manner-of-speaking predicates relates to the notion of ‘manner/result complementarity’, i.e. the idea that a verb root cannot lexicalize ‘manner’ and ‘result state’ simultaneously, with a concomitant difference in argument realization.

  • 2.
    Gentens, Caroline
    et al.
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Rudanko, Juhani
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    The Great Complement Shift and the role of understood subjects: a diachronic case study2018In: Book of Abstracts: International Conference on English Historical Linguistics 20, 2018, p. 96-96Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gentens, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Sansiñena, María Sol
    Spronck, Stef
    Van linden, An
    Irregular perspective shifts and perspective persistence, discourse-oriented and theoretical approaches: Introduction2019In: Pragmatics: Quarterly Publication of the International Pragmatics Association, ISSN 1018-2101, E-ISSN 2406-4238, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 155-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introduction, we set out the central themes of the special issue. It concentrates on imperfect function-form mappings, and discusses several cases in which specific perspectival meanings are not fully predictable on the basis of a perspectivizing grammatical construction alone. We distinguish two kinds of form-function mismatches: (1) perspective-persistent phenomena, i.e. grammatically signaled deictic and/or cognitive perspective shifts which are not realized in interpretation, and (2) irregular perspective shifts, which involve either grammatically un(der)specified shifts or grammatically signaled shifts that are interpreted as mixing multiple sources of deictic and/or cognitive perspective (‘multiple-perspective constructions’). We briefly discuss and contextualize each of the contributions, and highlight their central findings.

  • 4.
    Gentens, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Sansiñena, María SolSpronck, StefVan linden, An
    Irregular perspective shifts and perspective persistence, discourse-oriented and theoretical approaches: Special Issue2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 5. Kapitonov, Ivan
    et al.
    Gentens, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Yimarne in Kunbarlang: from similative to quotative2018In: VIII Syntax of the World's Languages: Abstracts, 2018, p. 106-108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on original fieldwork data, we discuss the array of uses of yimarne ‘like’ in Kunbarlang (Gunwinyguan, non-Pama-Nyungan; northern Australia), focusing on its reported discourse (RD) functions. First, we describe the range of functions that attest to yimarne’s grammaticalization, and propose a mechanism of domain extension that may underlie the development of the different uses. Then we present an analysis of the distribution and syntax underlying the quotative use of yimarne to contribute to the existing literature on the syntactic typology of quotative indices (QIs), as well as to the description of grammaticalization pathways for similative markers.

  • 6.
    Luokkala, Rosaleena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Gentens, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Growing complements: Transitivization processes and the diachrony of grow2019In: Language in time - Time in language: ICAME 40: Book of abstracts, 2019, p. 166-167Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 6 of 6
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