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  • 1. Davies, Peter
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Conceptual change across the disciplines: Researching students’ conceptions of allocation as part of conceptual development in economics.2008In: 6th international conference on Conceptual Change.: European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, Turku, Finland., 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on Conceptual Change has paid relatively less attention to the social than to the physical science domain. In particular, research on conceptual change in economic understanding has been fairly sparse and loosely connected. Given the potential significance of citizen’s economic understanding in delimiting government responses to globalisation (Davies 2006) this topic is worthy of further study. This paper reports on a small project in economics that investigates conceptions about the provision of free goods and services, drawing on evidence from students in different age groups. The paper considers previous work ( Furnham 1994), Leister & Halamachi 2006) of studies younger students, as well as the work within phenomenography (Marton), and students’ development of understanding of price. Results from this work conclude that :price, context, inconsistency, important in rel to citizenship.

  • 2.
    Davies, Peter
    et al.
    School of Education, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Students' understanding of socio-economic phenomena: conceptions about the free provison of goods and services2012In: Journal of Economic Psychology, ISSN 0167-4870, E-ISSN 1872-7719, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on conceptual change has paid relatively less attention to the social than to the physical science domain. In particular, research on conceptual change in economic understanding has been fairly sparse and loosely connected. Given the potential significance of citizen’s economic understanding in delimiting government responses to globalisation (Davies, 2006 P. Davies, Educating citizens for changing economies. Journal of Curriculum Studies,  38  (2006), pp. 15–30. Davies, 2006) this topic is worthy of further study. This study paper investigates conceptions about the provision of free goods and services, drawing on evidence from students in different age groups. In contrast to previous work we focus on the question ‘Should this product or service be made available for free?’ We compare the reasoning of students at different ages across a range of products and services and we explore the ways that they attempt to resolve conflicts within their reasoning.

  • 3.
    Davies, Peter
    et al.
    School of Education, Birmingham University, United Kingdom.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Understanding in Economics: some issues of causality, integration and representation2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Davies, Peter
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Mangan, Jean
    The application of variation theory in undergraduate teaching: addressing some difficulties in the context of students’ understanding of saving.2008In: 3rd international conference of the Phenomenography and Variation Theory Special Interest Group.: European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, Kristianstad, Sweden., 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports some findings from a small project that aims to address three difficulties that limit the application of variation theory in the teaching of some subjects. The first difficulty is reliance upon intensive methods to uncover different ways in which a phenomenon is understood. For example, phenomenographic research has suggested categorical differences in ways of understanding only a few phenomena in economics and, as far as we are aware, none at all in business studies. A second difficulty lies in the identification of a phenomenon. Current teaching frequently presents a way of understanding a phenomenon as the phenomenon itself. ‘Today we are going to learn about product life cycles’. In these circumstances it is not always a straightforward matter to identify the phenomenon. A third difficulty lies in variation in the ways in which different social phenomena can be experienced.

    The project examined students’ understanding of ‘withdrawals from the economy’. Data were collected through interviews and students’ examination answers. The interviews focused on the effects of changes in saving, first at an individual and then at a collective level. Interview transcripts were analysed by the three researchers to identify differences in ways of understanding the phenomenon of saving and these categories were then compared with those arising from the examination transcripts. These data are used to provide a basis for the discussion of the three difficulties identified above

  • 5.
    Davies, Peter
    et al.
    School of Education, Birmingham University, UK.
    Philip, Thomas
    Graduate School of Education & Information studies, UCLA, USA..
    Lopez Rodriguez, Cesar
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Values and competing frameworks in conceptual change in social science2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    This paper discusses conceptual change in the Social sciences, addressing in particular issues of values and implications for teaching. The paper is a product of a symposium organised in September 2011 in Stockholm where researchers in the disciplines of economics, politics and sociology presented and discussed empirical studies on conceptual change in these domains. The current paper is a theoretical discussion which draws on the empirical evidence presented in the symposium. We concentrate on evidence from two studies. First, a study by César López examined conceptions of ‘Nation’ held by students in Spain. A second study by Thomas Philip examined the willingness of pre-service teachers in California to change their conception of the relationship between education and employability. In both cases, students’ sense of belonging and purpose appeared to be an important barrier to conceptual change.

    Our main focus is on the way in which both these examples may be understood as challenges to ‘Master Narratives’ in Social Science. These narratives combine sets of descriptions, explanations and judgements to provide a coherent ways of seeing the social world. Descriptive categories (such as ‘nation’ or ‘education’) carry within them implicit judgements about the worth of the category (for instance whether nationhood or education should be seen as intrinsically good/bad, problematic/unproblematic) as well as implicit explanations of how the social world operates. The challenge for conceptual change in these circumstances is a need for simultaneous change in description, explanation and judgement. We discuss this challenge in the light of evidence provided by these two studies and we conclude with some implications for teaching in social science. 

  • 6. Ekström, Linda
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    How much politics is there? Students’ understandings of the role of values in political science2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7. Ekström, Linda
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    How much politics is there? Students’ understandings of the role of values in political science2017In: Nofa6: Abstracts, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8. Ekström, Linda
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    How much politics is there? Students’ understandings of the role of values in political science2017In: EARLI 2017 Book of Abstracts, Leuven, 2017, p. 193-193Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Ekström, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Teaching pedagogical content knowledge within a subject matter course in civics teacher education2015In: EARLI 2015: Book of Abstracts, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers’ content knowledge (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) are considerably related to students’ learning. As previous research has stressed the importance of learning opportunities in teacher education programs as foundations for the development of PCK, it is important to investigate which learning opportunities within teacher education programs can support the development of these competencies. This paper presents an explorative intervention study investigating the effects of a newly developed alternative teaching strategy for a subject matter course in the civics teacher program that is assumed to lead to increasing motivation and knowledge gains in CK and PCK. This alternative teaching strategy involves different learning opportunities (e.g., group discussion) and learning activities (e.g., identifying frequent misconceptions concerning ideologies). The research question was whether involvement in different learning activities leads to increased motivation and to knowledge gains in CK and PCK. In this intervention study with a quasi-experimental design, a total of 34 participants (19 in the experimental group; 15 in the control group) took part. To evaluate the effects of the alternative teaching strategy on motivation, CK, and PCK, different outcome measures of student teachers’ motivation, CK, and PCK were used (e.g., written take-home exams and focus group interviews). The results indicate that the experimental group showed better performance in PCK than the control group. The results also revealed that the alternative strategy had a positive effect on motivation. These results will be critically discussed with regard to their meaning for the development of appropriate learning opportunities in teacher education. 

  • 10. Ekström, Linda
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    What's positive about positive rights? Students' everyday understandings and the challenges of teaching political science2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11. Ekström, Linda
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    "What’s Positive About Positive Rights?" Students’ Everyday Understandings and the Challenges of Teaching Political Science2018In: Journal of Political Science Education, ISSN 1551-2169, E-ISSN 1551-2177, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A review of research into teaching and learning in political science education concludes that this literature emphasizes student outcomes and “show and tell” descriptions of pedagogical interventions (Craig 2014 Craig, John. 2014. “What Have We Been Writing About? Patterns and Trends in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Political Science.” Journal of Political Science Education 10 (1):23–36.[Taylor & Francis Online], [Google Scholar]). The present study instead aims to open the “black box” of conceptual learning in political science, illustrating the ambiguous role that everyday understandings of core concepts may play in the learning process. Starting from the conceptual change literature, we present findings on how everyday understandings influence learning regarding the concepts of “positive rights” and “anarchy,” resulting in various learning difficulties. The results suggest that teaching needs to explore and explain differences in meaning between scientific and everyday understandings.

  • 12. Ekström, Linda
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    What's positive about positive rights? Students' everyday understandings and the challenges of teaching political science2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Garavito Bermúdez, Diana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    EcoSystems Thinking and Natural Resource Management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Garavito, Diana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Systems dynamics thinking and conceptual development: the case of fishermen’s understanding of eco systems2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Garavito, Diana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Understanding Natural Complex Systems: The Case of Fishers’ Conceptualizations of Ecosystems2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Garavito-Bermúdez, Diana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Exploring interconnections between local ecological knowledge, professional identity and sense of place among Swedish fishers2017In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 627-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ecological knowledge of those who interact with ecosystems in everydaylife is situated in social and cultural contexts, as well as accumulated, transferred and adjusted through work practices. For them, ecosystems represent not only places for living but also places for working and defining themselves. This paper explores psychological aspects linking LEK/IEK/TEK to identity and sense of place in the context of fishery practices and management in Sweden. We analyse how knowledge of local ecosystems connect to fishers’ professional identity and their attachment to place by using the Person-Process-Place framework in integration with the Structure-Dynamic-Function framework on professional fishers in Sweden. On the basis of our results we conclude on the significance of physical as well as social and cultural features of fishing places for attachment and meaning as they are important for fishers’ local and professional identities, and also for ecological knowledge generation. Furthermore, fishers’ understanding of ecosystems complexity enhances their attachment and promotes positive emotions and behaviours for proximity maintenance.

  • 17.
    Garavito-Bermúdez, Diana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Linking a conceptual framework on systems thinking with experiential knowledge2016In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 89-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses a systemic approach for the study of fishers’ ecological knowledge in order to describe fishers’ ways of knowing and dealing with com- plexity in ecosystems, and discusses how knowledge is generated through, e.g. apprenticeship, experiential knowledge, and testing of hypotheses. The descrip- tion and analysis of fishers’ ecological knowledge has been done using the Structure–Dynamics–Functions conceptual framework. Fishers identify 5–50 feeding interactions (Structure), recognize populations’ dynamics over time, and, the impact of external factors (climate change, water quality and overfishing) (Dynamics) and finally, acknowledge different values or services (Functions) of the ecosystem (drinking water and fishing). Knowing about these three main aspects seems to be core knowledge embedded in fishers’ ecological knowledge, which comprises systems thinking. Systems thinking is arguably part of fishers’ professional skills and significant for sustainable natural resource management yet understanding ecosystem complexity is also a cognitive challenge.

  • 18.
    Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Davies, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education. University of Birmingham, UK.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Learning Economics and Attitudes to Market Solutions to Environmental Problems2017In: Education Sciences, E-ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change challenges governments to reduce emissions, and to gain support for such actions from their citizens. This can be in the form of taxation or legislation, or other forms of government interventions. In previous research, several instruments have been developed to capture attitudes towards the roles of markets and governments in the economy. Some of these instruments have assumed that respondents will have the same attitude towards the role of markets and governments, regardless of the context (e.g., welfare, environment, health) or the form of government intervention (law, taxation, subsidy, spending etc.). However, these studies have not examined attitudes towards, or belief in, the efficacy of government intervention in markets, through microeconomic policies on taxation (e.g., duties levied on particular products) or subsidies. This paper reports on the results of taking such a specific focus, that is, investigating economics students’ knowledge of, and attitudes towards, government interventions in markets, specifically addressing the problem of climate change. We make use of unique, two-wave longitudinal data from Swedish university students. The data were collected during their initial semester at the university. The first data collection was performed at the beginning of the semester, August/September 2014, and the second wave of data collection was performed in December/January 2014/2015, at the end of the semester. We were able to match 414 students between the first and second survey. The results show that students of economics change their policy attitudes and become more knowledgeable in economics. After one semester, they are more likely to think of economic instruments/incentives (taxes and subsidies) as good and efficient policy instruments, and less likely to think that other instruments (regulation and information) are good and efficient policy instruments. However, further analyses show that knowledgeable students do not have different attitudes toward environmental policy instruments, compared to students who do not answer the questions correctly. Hence, there seems to be some other factor affecting students in economics during their first semester, that changes their attitudes towards environmental policy instruments.

  • 19. Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Learning economics and attitudes to market solutions to environmental problems2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20. Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Knowing ‘social dilemmas’ – effects on willingness to sacrifice and accept environmental regulation2017In: Book of Abstrcats EARLI 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21. Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Torbjörnsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Attitudes to Climate Change Solutions among Students in Economics, Political Science and Law2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22. Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Torbjörnsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Attitudes to Climate Change Solutions among Students in Higher Education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Torbjörnsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Attitudes to Climate Change Solutions among University Students2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24. Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Torbjörnsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Högre utbildning och miljöattityder2017In: Larmar och gör sig till: SOM-undersökningen 2016 / [ed] Ulrika Andersson, Jonas Ohlsson, Henrik Oscarsson, Maria Oskarson, Göteborg: SOM-institutet , 2017, p. 505-514Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det här kapitlet studerar sambandet mellan högre utbildning och miljöattityder. I den vetenskapliga litteraturen har det ofta hävdats att högre utbildning leder till förändringar i människors förmågor och värderingar, vilket i sin tur påverkar deras miljöattityder. Vi undersöker detta genom att studera förändring över tid i den allmänna miljöopinionen i Sverige, med särskilt fokus på skillnader i miljöattityder mellan grupper med respektive utan högre utbildning. Detta görs med utgångspunkt i de nationella SOM-undersökningar 1987–2016. Därefter studerar vi mer specifikt om högre utbildning är associerat med ett mer uttalat intresse för miljöfrågan, oro för miljöförstöringen och åsikter om olika miljöpolitiska förslag. Dessa analyser baseras på 2016 års SOM-undersökning. Resultaten visar att en högre utbildningsnivå vanligen leder till ett större miljöintresse och ökad oro för miljön. Utbildningsnivån tycks också spela roll för inställning till vissa miljöpolitiska förslag. Avslutningsvis diskuterar vi implikationerna av dessa resultat och ger förslag till fortsatt forskning.

  • 25. Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Torbjörnsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    The Effects of Higher Education in Economics, Law and Political Science on Perceptions of Responsibility and Sustainability2017In: Handbook of Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development in Higher Education: Volume 1 / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Luciana Brandli, Paula Castro, Julie Newman, Springer, 2017, p. 159-170Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problems of environmental degradation are often conceptualized in terms of collective action dilemmas, and imply an increased demand for coordination and steering by public authorities. Social science is struggling with understanding how attitudes to collective action dilemmas and state intervention actually are formed. In the literature on environmental attitude formation, education is often claimed to be an important factor. It is argued for example that people with university degrees develop certain values essential for beliefs about personal responsibility and concern for the environment. Still there are a number of questions unanswered. For example, we know little about the effects of different educational programs. In this study we test the hypotheses by using a unique longitudinal data set based on surveys distributed to students in economics, law, and political science at seven universities in Sweden. Our results show a slight decrease in ascribed personal responsibility for environmental protection among the students after one semester. Instead, students ascribe an increased responsibility to various institutions and actors.

  • 26.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    A longitudinal approach to investigate upper secondary school students´value orientations and attitudes of pro-environmental actions2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    A longitudinal study of upper secondary school students' values and beliefs concerning pro-environmental actions2017In: The 6th NoFa-conference 2017: abstracts, Odense: Institut for Kulturvidenskaber, Syddansk Universitet , 2017, p. 283-285Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    A longitudinal study of upper secondary school students´ values and beliefs concerning pro-environmental actions2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    A longitudinal study of upper secondary school students’ values and beliefs regarding policy responses to climate changeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores changes of environmental values and beliefs among secondary school business and economics students regarding government and market solutions to climate change. A longitudinal survey was administrated to students at two occasions including 212 participants in the first measurement. Results show a small significant increase in importance for altruistic, biospheric and egoistic value orientations at average. At individual level, there are substantial movements over time, 60% of the students change strength in values over time. Taxes and legislations are the most effective solutions to climate change however there was a decrease in seeing market prices as useful measurements. Analysis suggested no direct relationship between change in value orientation and change in norms. However indirect associations was found mediated by changing beliefs in the efficacy of education and information and the efficacy of tax policies. For example, students who became more egoistic and more convinced about the efficacy of tax were less likely than others to be willing to take personal actions. 

  • 30.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Students’ understandings of pricing goods and services that generate negative environmental effects2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Students´ understandings of pricing goods and services with negative environmental effect2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Swedish Upper Secondary School Students' Conceptions of Negative Environmental Impact and Pricing2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 982-996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores relationships between upper secondary school students. understanding of prices and environmental impacts. The study uses responses from 110 students to problems in which they were asked to explain differences in prices and also to express and justify opinions on what should be the difference in prices. Very few students expressed an environmental dimension in their understanding of price. A few students suggested that environmental impact influenced price by raising demand for Environmentally friendly products. A few students suggested that, environmentally friendly products. had higher prices because they were more costly to produce. We found no examples of students combining both lines of explanation. However, nearly half of the students believed that prices should reflect environmental effects, and this reasoning was divided between cases where the point was justified by a broad environmental motivation and cases where the point was justified in relation to incentives-to get consumers to act in a more environmentally friendly way.

  • 33.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Swedish upper secondary school students´ conceptual formation of environmental costs and pricing2015In: Book of Abstracts EARLI 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates changes in upper secondary students´ conceptions of relationships between prices charged to consumers and the environmental implications of production, distribution and consumption of goods and services. The research identifies the fragmentary nature of students´ every-day reasoning in relation to productivity, consumers´ preferences and externalities, here defined as harmful side effects. It also identifies characteristics of partial conceptions, which we interpret as showing students´ conceptions in a process of change towards a more scientific understanding of relationships between price and environmental impacts.

  • 34.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Understanding ’Price’ and the Environment: Exploring Upper Secondary Students’ Conceptual Development2017In: Journal of Social Science Education, ISSN 1611-9665, E-ISSN 1618-5293, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 68-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore changes in upper secondary students´ conceptions of environmental issues in how prices are determined and how they should be determined. Design:The study uses an ’alternative frameworks’ conceptual change approach to examine change in the conceptions of fifteen business and economic students. Students were asked about the prices of familiar products and asked to explain prices for eco-friendly and eco-unfriendly products. A first interview was conducted in the second year of education and the second interview a year later when students were 18 years old and in the final year of schooling. Interviews were carried out out by a researcher independent from the schools and carried out in schools. Findings: Identifies the fragmentary nature of students´ every-day thinking in relation to productivity, consumer preference and negative externalities. Results show characteristics of partial conceptions, which are considered as students´ conceptions in a process of change towards a more scientific understanding of relationships between price and environmental impacts. Practical implications: The study clarifies conceptions, which students bring to the classroom and the directions thatdevelopment in understanding may take. The study should help teachers to design effective strategies to support students’ learning.

  • 35.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Exploring students’ conceptions of solutions to environmental problems: Cases from upper secondary Swedish schools2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Jägerskog, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Making possible by making visible: How different visual representations of price may enable students to see “the trees”, “the forest”, or both2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to contribute to the understanding of how two different visual representations of price (a supply/demand graph and a causal loop diagram) facilitate learning of price. Prior research has investigated if graphs facilitate learning (Cohn et al., 2001), qualitatively different ways of understanding price (Pang & Marton, 2003) and common problems when learning about price (Strober & Cook, 1992). How learning of pricing is affected by the use of different visual representations has not yet been addressed. Lessons were conducted with four upper secondary classes, of which two had lessons based on the traditional supply/demand graph and two on a causal loop diagram (Wheat, 2007). The material, written pre- and post-test and recorded small group discussions, was analysed phenomenographically. Results show different understandings of price, critical aspects of this understanding, and what learning, in relation to those critical aspects, seems to be made possible through the different representations.

  • 37.
    Jägerskog, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Making Possible by Making Visible: Investigating Learning Opportunities when Using Different Visual Representations of Price2018In: Programme and Book of Abstracts, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to contribute to the understanding of how two different visual representations of price facilitate learning of the concept. Upper secondary students’ understanding of price in relation to two different visual representations was investigated from a multimodal point of view. Lessons were conducted with four different classes, of which two had lessons based on the traditional supply/demand graph and two on a causal loop diagram (Wheat, 2007). Students conducted a written pre- and post-test and the material was analysed phenomenographically and in relation to the visual representation used. Results suggest that students’ understanding of price was affected by the visual representation used in teaching in terms of more qualified understandings being developed through the use of a causal loop diagram than the graph. Results also indicate the importance of reflecting on what conceptual understanding visual representations represent and facilitate, when choosing representations for teaching and learning.

     

     

  • 38. Krasny, Marianne E.
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Plummer, Ryan
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Environmental education, resilience, and learning: reflection and moving forward2010In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 16, no 5-6, p. 665-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social-ecological resilience, a rapidly expanding area of scholarship internationally, seeks to understand how society and ecosystems mediate, adapt, and learn from change. This special issue is a pioneering attempt to explore the overlap of resilience, learning, and environmental education, in which four broad perspectives have emerged: (1) environmental education and learning may foster attributes of resilient social-ecological systems (e.g., biological diversity, participatory forms of governance, short feedback loops); (2) environmental education should not be viewed as an isolated means to address environmental issues, but rather as a complex and multifaceted part of a larger system of interacting structures and processes; (3) resilience thinking at multiple levels suggests a 'way out' of the instrumental/intrinsic split in environmental education; and (4) parallels among concepts used in learning theory and social-ecological systems resilience may contribute to discussions of transferability of ideas across disciplines. Whereas the authors are overwhelmingly positive about the potential contributions of environmental education and learning to resilience, in this endpiece to the special issue we offer cautions in suggesting the need to look for counter examples and to be concise in the use of terminology. Finally, we pose several research questions that might guide further work in this area, including: What are the outcomes of different approaches to environmental education relative to resilience attributes, such as social capital and ecosystem services? How do environmental education programs situated in management practice impact learning and values at the level of individuals and organizations? What role do different types of environmental education play in governance?

  • 39. Krasny, Marianne E.
    et al.
    Lundholm, CeciliaStockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.Plummer, Ryan
    Resilience in social-ecological systems: the role of learning and education2010Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Resilience thinking challenges us to reconsider the meaning of sustainability in a world that must constantly adapt in the face of gradual and at times catastrophic change. This volume further asks environmental education and resource management scholars to consider the relationship of environmental learning and behaviours to attributes of resilient social-ecological systems - attributes such as ecosystem services, innovative governance structures, biological and cultural diversity, and social capital. Similar to current approaches to environmental education and education for sustainable development, resilience scholarship integrates social and ecological perspectives.

    The authors of Resilience in social-ecological systems: the role of learning and education present a wealth of perspectives, integrating theory with reviews of empirical studies in natural resource management, and in youth, adult, and higher education. The authors explore the role of education and learning in helping social-ecological systems as they respond to change, through adaptation and transformation. This book also serves to integrate a growing literature on resilience and social learning in natural resources management, with research in environmental education and education for sustainable development.

  • 40. Krasny, Marianne E.
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Plummer, Ryan
    Resilience in Social-Ecological Systems: the Roles of Learning and Education2010In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 16, no 5-6, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41. Krasny, Marianne E.
    et al.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Shava, Soul
    Lee, Eunju
    Kobori, Hiromi
    Urban Landscapes as Learning Arenas for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Management2013In: Urbanization, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services: Challenges and Opportunities : A Global Assessment / [ed] Thoms Elmqvist, Michail Fragkias, Julie Goodness, Burak Güneralp, Peter J. Marcotullio, Robert I. McDonald, Susan Parmell, Maria Schewenius, Marte Sendstad, Karen C. Seto, Cathy Wilkinson, Dordrecht: Springer, 2013, p. 629-664Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Li, Sternäng
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Climate Change and Costs – Investigating Chinese Students’ Conceptions of Nature and Economic Development2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Att forska och lära om miljö.: En intentionell analys av forskarstuderandes miljöforskning och tolkning av begreppet ’miljö’2001In: Nordisk förening för Pedagogisk forskning: Kongress 15-18 mars, Stockholm, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Att lära om miljö: Forskar- och högskolestuderandes tolkningar av ett miljöinnehåll i utbildningen2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on students’ perspectives on environmental education and is based on three case studies. The aim is to explore and describe the students’ interpretations of, and learning about, ecology and environmental issues. The students’ learning processes are analysed from an intentional perspective, i.e. a perspective which takes into account the students’ educational aims defined as projects.

    In the first case study interviews were carried out with six first-year civil engineering students following a compulsory course in Ecology. In the second case study the dialogue between a group of four biology students was tape-recorded while they were working on a task on environmental reports. The third case study was based on interviews with six postgraduate students regarding their interpretations of environmental research and the task of writing a thesis.

    In all the three cases the students interpret a cultural context concerning values. The three case studies show the way values and emotions become an aspect of the learning process and reveal the students’ difficulties in differentiating between values and descriptions of phenomena. This is analysed and explained in relation to the students’ various projects that come into conflict in the educational setting. The differences among the three groups of students can be explained as a difference in the students’ ability to identify various kinds of projects, and the students’ possibilities of choosing between the projects.

  • 45.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Book review: Participation and learning: perspectives on education and the environment, health and sustainability by Reid Alan and  Jensen Bjarne  Bruun, Nikel Jutta (2008).  Dortrecht: Springer; 275 pages. $169.00. ISBN 9781402064159.2009In: Children, Youth and the Environment, ISSN 1546-2250, Vol. 19, no 1Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Case studies: exploring students’ meaning and elaborating learning theories.2004In: Environmental Education Research, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 115-124Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Conceptual change and the complexity of learning2018In: Converging perspectives on conceptual change: mapping an emerging paradigm in the learning sciences / [ed] Tamer G. Amin, Olivia Levrini, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 34-42Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on the conceptual change process in terms of coming to a scientific understanding which means actively creating relationships between a meta level, conceptual and empirical level, of a discipline. It especially addresses conceptual change in the social sciences and provides empirical examples from research in this area. The chapter also addresses affective aspects of conceptual change, and concludes that further research is needed which also brings into focus epistemological dimensions.

  • 48.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Conceptual change and values: An intentional approach to understanding students’ learning in economics.2008In: Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Division on Learning and Instruction: Cognitive, Social, and Motivational Processes, New York., 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents findings from a research project on conceptual change and the affective domain, an increasing area of research interest. The study presented comprised interviews conducted with master students who studied economics, having a degree in biology. The results show that students’ prior knowledge, values, professional aims and conceptions of society cause difficulties in understanding economical concepts. From an educational point of view the key points in the paper are that students’ learning difficulties can be as much due to issues of values and the social and cultural setting, as to cognition. The paper gives an account of these aspects explicitly, however, from a teaching perspective these are often hidden and unknown.

  • 49.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Contextualisation and learning in economics: An intentional perspective on the role of values.2008In: Symposia Exploring “Hot” Conceptual Change: Affect, Emotions, Values, Self-Efficacy and Epistemic Beliefs.: 6th international conference on Conceptual Change, European Association for Research in Learning and Instruction, Turku, Finland., 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports research findings from a project focussing the way values influence learning and conceptual change in the social science subject of economics. Interviews were conducted, focussing students’ experiences of learning in economics, with 11 (all) students who were in their first week of a masters course on ‘Sustainable enterprising’, at Stockholm University. The 11 students were chosen due to their various educational backgrounds in biology and economics: two students had degrees in economics, and among the remaining 9 students, 5 had a degree in biology followed by courses in economics. The results of the analysis draw on inferences made from an intentional perspective, that is, a perspective that takes into account the students’ aims defined as ‘projects’. First, the results show that economics concepts and theories were interpreted in a societal context as values in monetary terms were viewed in line with a dominant discourse in society, to which the students opposed. Secondly, when elaborating on what (natural objects and processes) in an economical context, the concepts price and pricing became challenging in relation to the consequences: not capturing important features necessary for environmental maintenance. In relation to previous studies of learning in economics (e.g. Pang & Marton, 2005) this is of particular interest, as the ‘what’ in pricing has not been acknowledged. Importantly, these students succeeded in learning, which can be explained by their professional aims, their ‘project’. The paper finalises by discussing findings in relation to the “warming trend” (Sinatra, 2005) in conceptual change research.

  • 50.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Discourse, cause and change: A study on economics students’ conceptions of child labour2008In: Values and Democracy in Education for Sustainable development: Contributions from Swedish Research / [ed] Johan Östman, Malmö: Liber, 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 91
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