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  • 1.
    Dudas, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Didactic modelling of complex sustainability issues in chemistry education2018In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 267-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To meet future challenges regarding sustainability issues, science education needs to address how to educate scientifically literate and responsible citizens. One aspect of this is how to draw students’ attention to the complexity in sustainability issues. Therefore, this study analyses how complexity can become visible in students’ deliberations. The study has been conducted as an in-situ study at two upper secondary schools. The data was analysed using Practical Epistemological Analysis (PEA) and Deliberative Educational Questions (DEQ). The results show that four different kinds of considerations were used to visualise complexity. Those considerations regarded facts and values in relation to known and unknown facts. The considerations were used to develop a didactic model. Design principles were also developed, which together with the model can support teachers in didactic analyses regarding complex sustainability issues in chemistry education. Furthermore, the study shows that chemistry education can contribute to development of Bildung and democratic citizenship.

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  • 2.
    Dudas, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Didactic modelling of complex sustainability issues in chemistry education2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To meet future challenges regarding sustainability issues, science education needs to address how to educate scientifically literate and responsible citizens. Chemistry education must be organized in a way that gives the students opportunity to participate in discussions and decision-making regarding sustainability issues in which chemistry knowledge is needed. One aspect of education for responsible citizenship is to draw students’ attention to the complexity in sustainability issues.

    The aim of this study is to analyse how complexity in sustainability issues can be visualized in upper secondary school chemistry education.

    This study was conducted as a didactic modelling inspired by Design Based Research. Two cycles were conducted: cycle 1 with 12 students discussing batteries in different products and cycle 2 with 38 students discussing organic pollutants in everyday products. The data was analysed using Practical Epistemological Analysis (PEA) (Wickman & Östman, 2002) and Deliberative Educational Questions (DEQ) (Lundegård & Wickman, 2007).

    Four different kinds of considerations emerged in students’ discussions which were used to develop a didactic model visualizing complexity. Those considerations regarded facts and values in relation to sufficient and insufficient factual knowledge. All four kinds of considerations are needed to visualize complexity.

    The results showed that conflicting perspectives/values and the issues’ incompleteness and uncertainty only emerged to a small extent in the students’ discussions in cycle 1. In cycle 2 all four kinds of considerations emerged more equally. The design principles in cycle 2 were that the students’ activity should explicitly request conflicting perspectives and values and also include frontier research in chemistry. The result indicates that those gave the students more opportunities to visualize complexity.

    The didactic model and design principles that were developed can together be used for teaching and learning from sustainability issues in chemistry education.

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