Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Beier, Susanne
    et al.
    Eib, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Oehmann, Verena
    Fiedler, Peter
    Fiedler, Klaus
    Influence of judges' behaviors on perceived procedural justice2014In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, ISSN 0021-9029, E-ISSN 1559-1816, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 46-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of judges' behaviors on procedural justice was analyzed in a field study, observing the judges' behaviors during n=129 trials and assessing the defendants and the audiences' justice perceptions. The observed judicial behavior was unrelated to the defendants' justice perceptions. However, the more respectful the judge treated the defendants, the fairer the audience perceived the trial. In general, the effect size of the relationship between observational measures and subjective justice ratings was small in comparison to the relationship within defendants' or audiences' ratings. There were striking differences in the justice perception between the two data sources, namely defendants and audience. Thus, the source matters, and to avoid a same-source bias, should be taken into account when analyzing justice perceptions.

  • 2.
    Eib, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Does organisational justice predict employees’ organisational survival? A five years’ study2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The empirical evidence on the relationship between organisational justice and turnover is still in question. Most studies have explored the relationship between procedural justice and turnover intentions, studies on actual turnover are rare, have also only focused on procedural justice and found inconsistent results (Posthuma, Maertz, & Dworkin, 2007). Recently, a shift from specific justice dimensions towards the consideration of overall organisational justice has been proposed (Ambrose & Schminke, 2009). Stepwise logistic regression is used to explore the importance of organisational justice among other predictors for actual turnover that have been proposed such as variables from the stress and job content field (Griffeth, Hom, & Gaertner, 2000). Survival analysis as the adequate statistical tool neglected so far will be applied to study whether overall organisational justice predicts the belonging to the group of the remaining or left employees which provides a more stringent test for the issue. Questionnaire data comes from Swedish accountants who were administered over the course of five years. Preliminary results hint at that organisational justice perceptions indeed were significantly lower in employees who left the organisation. Also, trust was lower, salary, job satisfaction and commitment whereas role conflict, job insecurity and health complaints were higher. The described analyses follow. This study helps clarifying inconsistent findings regarding the relationship between organisational justice and turnover, introduces the new perspective of overall organisational justice and tests whether the relation to turnover is specific to procedural justice.

  • 3.
    Eib, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Processes of Organizational Justice: Insights into the perception and enactment of justice2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Well-being at work is of major public interest, and justice at the workplace can be a key factor contributing to employees and managers feeling well. Research has found direct relationships between organizational justice perceptions and work and health outcomes. With research on the justice–health link still emerging, this thesis examines the moderating and mediating processes for the effects of justice perceptions on work outcomes and especially health outcomes. As little is known about those who enact justice, the antecedents and consequences of justice enactment are also studied. In Study I, the relationships between organizational justice and work and health outcomes were in focus, as the moderating role of job characteristics was investigated utilizing the demand–control(–support) model. Organizational justice and job characteristics were associated with work and health outcomes within and across time. The multiplicative effects showed that the organizational justice effects were stronger when perceived job demands were high, job control was low or social support was low. Study II examined the processes through which justice perceptions translate into health outcomes. Building on the allostatic load model, mental preoccupation with work was found to be a relevant mediator of the justice–health relationship, with locus of control moderating the mediated relationships. Study III focused on the actor perspective. Investigating predictions based on the deontic model of justice and ego-depletion theory, moral regard and justice self-efficacy predicted justice enactment positively, and justice enactment had positive effects on feeling professionally recognized but also negative health consequences for the actors themselves. This thesis contributes to advancing the emergent justice–health research stream by providing insights into the processes underlying these aspects, and by incorporating this stream into the actor perspective. 

  • 4.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The moderating influence of the demand-control-support model on the relationships between organisational justice and well-being2011In: 2nd International Workshop on Insights in Organisational Justice and Behavioural Ethics, 27-28 June 2011, Birmingham, UK, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the post-industrial working life - characterised by job intensification, blurred boundaries between work life and non-work life and postponed statutory retirement age - it is more necessary than ever that organisations and employees find a way to work highly efficiently and at the same time in a sustainable manner.

  • 5.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    The interaction between organizational justice and job characteristics: Associations with work attitudes and employee health cross-sectionally and over time2015In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 549-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates to what extent main and interactive effects of overall organizational justice and job characteristics shape employees’ work attitudes (organizational commitment, intention to stay) and health (mental health, somatic health) cross-sectionally and after a period of one year. Questionnaire data from 429 Swedish accountants show that generally both organizational justice and job characteristics had main effects on all outcomes at both time points. Interactions between organizational justice and job characteristics were found for every job characteristic studied (demand, control, support), for both time points but mainly for intention to stay and somatic health. The results show that perceptions of organizational justice and job characteristics can have additive and multiplicative synergetic effects for work attitudes and employee health.

  • 6.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Who does and who does not show the negative effects of informational injustice?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Injustice at the workplace is known to be a serious stressor for workplace-related attitudes, behaviours and health. Earlier research shows that higher age and trust is important in preventing increased turnover intention. Others found that employees who engage in withdrawal behaviour indicate less emotional exhaustion when perceiving injustice. However, traditional coping behaviours have not been studied as moderators before. Yet, this could elucidate preventive factors of how to deal with injustice experiences at work. Finding coping strategies that buffer the expected negative effects of injustice might disclose more beneficial ways of handling injustice than withdrawal behaviour for the organisation and employees.

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of coping strategies as the moderators for the relation between supervisory informational injustice and its relation to job satisfaction, turnover intention and work-related health. We argue that employees with problem-focused coping (changing the situation) may have difficulties in applying this strategy within a hierarchical dependence relationship like the one to the supervisor. We predict that problem-focused coping does not attenuate the expected negative effects of perceived injustice. Employees with more emotion-focused coping strategies (avoidance and devaluation strategies) may perceive higher job satisfaction, lower turnover intention but impaired health. The analyses were also probed for the effect of gender.

    Method: Data from 373 Swedish accountants is used. The data collection was conducted in 2009.

    Results: We applied moderated hierarchical regression analyses. While change-oriented coping was found to moderate the relation between informational justice and turnover intention and work-related health, this coping strategy did not make a difference when informational justice was low. For women, the combination of high informational justice and high change-oriented coping was associated with lower levels of turnover intention and more positive work-related health.  Contrary to our predictions, avoidance and devaluation coping strategies had different effects from each other. Devaluation coping attenuated the negative association between informational injustice and job satisfaction as well as turnover intention. The opposite was true for avoidance coping which amplified the negative association between informational injustice and job satisfaction and turnover intention.

    Discussion: Based on these results two main conclusions can be made from this study. First, changing the situation seems to increase the positive effect of informational justice from the supervisor. Second, devaluing problems seems to work as a buffer factor for the negative effects of informational injustice whereas avoidance coping worsens these effects.

  • 7.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Låstad, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    A 5-year Multilevel Investigation of the Relations Between Job Insecurity, Informational Justice and Work Attitudes2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The negative effects of job insecurity on work attitudes are well-known. The uncertainty management theory (UMT) suggests that organisational justice may help to deal with the stressor job insecurity. This study presents the results of a multi-level investigation on the moderating influence of informational justice on the negative effects of quantitative and qualitative job insecurity on work attitudes. Full data of 183 Swedish accountants, five time points with one-year time lags, confirmed the predictions based on the UMT. The few studies that tested this proposition found generally confirming results. This study adds to the current knowledge with several accounts. One is that qualitative job insecurity, anticipation of losing valued job features, is included whereas previous research has only dealt with the general worry of job loss. Second the focus is on informational justice as a moderator which has been neglected so far although more likely to buffer the negative effects on work attitudes. Third, the data is analysed in a multi-level fashion such that the fluctuation of job insecurity and organisational justice over the time of five years and the common between-person differences are investigated simultaneously. Organisations that undergo changes that create job insecurity in their employees may offset the negative consequences by using informational justice.

  • 8.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Interaction effects of organisational justice and work characteristics: cross-sectional and longitudinal relations to work attitudes and employee’ well-being2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Work characteristics have often been the focus in research intending to understand organisational behaviour and how employee health and well-being may be shaped by characteristics of the work environment. Both perceptions of organisational justice as well as perceptions of work characteristics pertain to the work environment domain; both have also been handled as psychosocial predictors for health outcomes and shown to be related to relevant work and health outcomes. Missing from the current picture is how these two different domains of the work environment interact, and together shape work and health outcomes. When employees make a judgment about the organisation as a whole – that the organisation is fair and can be trusted – and because of this are inclined to engage in their work, and may even feel healthy and happy at their workplace, does it matter what work characteristics they face? Previous studies show a mixed picture, with only few studies available at all, some studies with no significant interaction effects, most of the studies done on the control component, very few studies that investigated the interplay with the demand and support component. Also, the previous studies only studied relations with cross-sectional data, and there is not one study that predicted work and health outcomes. The current study first reviews the limited available evidence on the combined effect of justice and work characteristics, and then tests interaction effects between organisational justice and the Job-Demand-Control-Support model components as predictors of two work outcomes (organisational commitment, intention to stay) and two health outcomes (mental health, somatic health). Data from Swedish accountants are used, cross-sectionally and longitudinally after one year. While not all interactions are significant, there are significant interactions for each of the work characteristics, for each of the four outcome variables and for both time points. The results are presented and interpreted with the help of four different mechanisms: reduction, amplification, aggravation, and compensation.

  • 9.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Blom, Victoria
    Don’t Let it Get to You!: a Moderated Mediated Approach to the (In)justice–Health Relationship2015In: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, ISSN 1076-8998, E-ISSN 1939-1307, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 434-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the consequences of overall justice perceptions on employees’ mental health and work-family conflict. While many studies have found that perceiving injustice at work is harmful, little is known about the underlying processes. Based on the allostatic load model, it is hypothesized that mental preoccupation with work, defined as a cognitive state, is a mediator linking overall justice perceptions to employee health. Moreover, we argue that locus of control is a moderator for the mediated relationship. We tested our hypotheses with panel data consisting of 412 Swedish office workers. Results support that mental preoccupation with work mediates the relationship between overall justice and mental health, and overall justice and work-family conflict. Results also reveal that mental preoccupation with work plays a greater mediating role for individuals with an external locus of control. Implications and suggestions for future studies on the emerging relationship between organizational justice and health are discussed.

  • 10.
    Köhninger, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eib, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Zijstra, F.
    Exchange ideology as a moderator of the relationship between justice perceptions and work outcomes: Test of a social exchange model2013In: Forum för arbetslivsforskning (FALF) - Changes in Working Life: Individual, Organizational, and Methodological Perspectives, Stockholm, Sweden, June 17-19, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the emergence and effects of organisational justice has been on the rise in recent years. Evidence suggests that organisational justice affects various work outcomes. Based on a social exchange approach, it is argued that individuals reciprocate justice to its source by forming favourable attitudes about their organisation and direct supervisor. However, research further suggests that individuals´ responsiveness to reciprocate differs, described as exchange ideology. It still remains unclear when exchange ideology moderates the relationship between justice perceptions and positive work outcomes. The purpose of the present study is thus twofold. First, it is going to be examined whether individuals reciprocate fair treatment to its source, mediated by exchange quality. It is expected that perceived organisational support mediates the relationship between procedural justice and organisational commitment while leader-member exchange mediates the relationship between interactional justice and supervisor-directed citizenship behaviour. Second, the present study adds to existing research by testing when exchange ideology moderates the strength of the mediated relationships. Expected results are that the relationship between exchange quality and work outcomes will be more positive for individuals with a strict exchange ideology. Data will be collected during spring in a social network of employees working in the field of human development in Germany, via a web-based self-report questionnaire. Different regression analysis techniques (moderation, mediation and depending on the attained sample size also moderated mediation analyses) will be conducted to test the hypotheses.

  • 11.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Eib, Constanze
    University of East Anglia, UK.
    Peristera, Paraskevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    The influence of and change in procedural justice on self-rated health trajectories: Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health results2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 320-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Procedural justice perceptions are shown to be associated with minor psychiatric disorders, long sickness absence spells, and poor self-rated health, but previous studies have rarely considered how changes in procedural justice influence changes in health. Methods: Data from four consecutive biennial waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Survey of Health (SLOSH) (N=5854) were used to examine trajectories of self-rated health. Adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic position, and marital status, we studied the predictive power of change in procedural justice perceptions using individual growth curve models within a multilevel framework. Results: The results show that self-rated health trajectories slowly decline over time. The rate of change was influenced by age and sex, with older people and women showing a slower rate. After adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic position, and marital status, procedural justice was significantly associated with self-rated health. Also, improvements in procedural justice were associated with improvements in self-rated health. Additionally, a reverse relationship with and change in self-rated health predicting procedural justice was found. Conclusions: Our findings support the idea that procedural justice at work is a crucial aspect of the psychosocial work environment and that changes towards more procedural justice could influence self-rated health positively. The reciprocal association of procedural justice and self-rated health warrants further research.

  • 12. Soenen, Guillaume
    et al.
    Eib, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Torres, Olivier
    Justice Enactment and Well-Being: A test among SME owner-managersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study contributes to justice theory by exploring the antecedents of justice enactment and its consequences for the well-being of justice actors. Building on deontic justice and ego depletion theory, we suggest justice enactment triggers negative ego depletion effects, and, simultaneously, positive deontic effects. The relative strength of these opposing effects is hypothesized to vary across the facets of justice enactment and determines whether interpersonal and informational justice enactment has a positive or negative impact on well-being. A longitudinal study of owner-managers of small and medium-sized companies in France shows, as hypothesized, that moral regard and justice self-efficacy positively predict justice enactment. After controlling for baseline levels of health, vacation and business results, findings reveal that interpersonal justice enactment is positively related to self-rated health, while informational justice enactment is positively related to professional recognition, but negatively related to health (both self-rated health and sleep quality). Implications for research on the actor perspective of justice and implications for practice are discussed.

  • 13. Vetter, Max
    et al.
    Eib, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hill-Kloss, Sonja
    Wollscheid, Philipp
    Hagemann, Dirk
    Development and validation of a scale for Social Exhibitionism on the Internet (SEXI)2014In: Diagnostica (Göttingen), ISSN 0012-1924, E-ISSN 2190-622X, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 153-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socially exhibitionistic behavior in virtual environments has been a scarcely researched issue, despite its increasing relevance in modem societies. Although many theoretical approaches have been suggested, there is a lack of empirical work on this construct. One possible reason for this deficit is the absence of an appropriate instrument for the measurement. In order to measure socially exhibitionistic behavior, a 15-item-scale and a corresponding shortened 8-item version was developed. An explorative factor analysis yielded the expected one-factor solution. Discriminant validity was investigated by analyzing the correlation structure between the new scale and several other measures of personality (Study 1). This was followed by an extensive validation study to investigate both discriminant and convergent validity (Study 2) and a quasi-experimental study comprising extreme prototypes of socially exhibitionistic behavior (Study 3). The findings strongly suggest that the new scale is an appropriate instrument for the measurement of socially exhibitionistic behavior in virtual environments.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf