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  • 1.
    Andersson, Charlotta S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Berthold, Catrine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    A Dynamic C-terminal Segment in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mn/Fe R2lox Protein can Assume a Helical Structure with Possible Functional ConsequencesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Charlotta S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Berthold, Catrine L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    A dynamic c terminal segment in the mycobacterium tuberculosis mn/fe r2lox protein can adopt a helical structure with possible functional consequences2012In: Chemistry and Biodiversity, ISSN 1612-1872, E-ISSN 1612-1880, Vol. 9, no 9, p. 1981-1988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis R2-like ligand-binding oxidase (MtR2lox) belongs to a recently discovered group of proteins that are homologous to the ribonucleotide reductase R2 proteins. MtR2lox carries a heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor and, unlike R2 proteins, a large ligand-binding cavity. A unique tyrosine-valine cross link is also found in the vicinity of the active site. To date, all known structures of R2 and R2lox proteins show a disordered C-terminal segment. Here, we present two new crystal forms of MtR2lox, revealing an ordered helical C-terminal. The ability of alternating between an ordered and disordered state agrees well with bioinformatic analysis of the protein sequence. Interestingly, ordering of the C-terminal helix shields a large positively charged patch on the protein surface, potentially used for interaction with other cellular components. We hypothesize that the dynamic C-terminal segment may be involved in control of protein function in vivo.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Charlotta S
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    A Mycobacterium tuberculosis ligand-binding Mn/Fe protein reveals a new cofactor in a remodeled R2-protein scaffold2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 14, p. 5633-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlamydia trachomatis R2c is the prototype for a recently discovered group of ribonucleotide reductase R2 proteins that use a heterodinuclear Mn/Fe redox cofactor for radical generation and storage. Here, we show that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein Rv0233, an R2 homologue and a potential virulence factor, contains the heterodinuclear manganese/iron-carboxylate cofactor but displays a drastic remodeling of the R2 protein scaffold into a ligand-binding oxidase. The first structural characterization of the heterodinuclear cofactor shows that the site is highly specific for manganese and iron in their respective positions despite a symmetric arrangement of coordinating residues. In this protein scaffold, the Mn/Fe cofactor supports potent 2-electron oxidations as revealed by an unprecedented tyrosine-valine crosslink in the active site. This wolf in sheep's clothing defines a distinct functional group among R2 homologues and may represent a structural and functional counterpart of the evolutionary ancestor of R2s and bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Charlotta S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lundgren, Camilla A. K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Magnúsdóttir, Auður
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ge, Changrong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wieslander, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Martinez Molina, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase: Structural Basis for Housing Lipid Substrates Longer than the Enzyme2012In: Structure, ISSN 0969-2126, E-ISSN 1878-4186, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 1062-1070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis acid-induced operon MymA encodes the fatty acyl-CoA synthetase FadD13 and is essential for virulence and intracellular growth of the pathogen. Fatty acyl-CoA synthetases activate lipids before entering into the metabolic pathways and are also involved in transmembrane lipid transport. Unlike soluble fatty acyl-CoA synthetases, but like the mammalian integral-membrane very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases, FadD13 accepts lipid substrates up to the maximum length tested (C-26). Here, we show that FadD13 is a peripheral membrane protein. The structure and mutational studies reveal an arginine- and aromatic-rich surface patch as the site for membrane interaction. The protein accommodates a hydrophobic tunnel that extends from the active site toward the positive patch and is sealed by an arginine-rich lid-loop at the protein surface. Based on this and previous data, we propose a structural basis for accommodation of lipid substrates longer than the enzyme and transmembrane lipid transport by vectorial CoA-esterification.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Charlotta S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhrström, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Popović-Bijelić, Ana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The manganese ion of the heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor in Chlamydia trachomatis ribonucleotide reductase R2c is located at metal position 1.2012In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 134, no 1, p. 123-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The essential catalytic radical of Class-I ribonucleotide reductase is generated and delivered by protein R2, carrying a dinuclear metal cofactor. A new R2 subclass, R2c, prototyped by the Chlamydia trachomatis protein was recently discovered. This protein carries an oxygen-activating heterodinuclear Mn(II)/Fe(II) metal cofactor and generates a radical-equivalent Mn(IV)/Fe(III) oxidation state of the metal site, as opposed to the tyrosyl radical generated by other R2 subclasses. The metal arrangement of the heterodinuclear cofactor remains unknown. Is the metal positioning specific, and if so, where is which ion located? Here we use X-ray crystallography with anomalous scattering to show that the metal arrangement of this cofactor is specific with the manganese ion occupying metal position 1. This is the position proximal to the tyrosyl radical site in other R2 proteins and consistent with the assumption that the high-valent Mn(IV) species functions as a direct substitute for the tyrosyl radical.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Charlotta Selina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Structural studies of R2 and R2–like proteins with a heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor and enzymes involved in Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipid metabolism2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tuberculosis is a notorious disease responsible for the deaths of 1.4 million people worldwide. A third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium causing the disease. The increase of multi drug-resistant strains worsens the situation, and the World Health Organization has declared tuberculosis to be a global emergency. The bacterium envelopes itself with a unique set of very long-chain lipids that play an important role in virulence and drug resistance. Therefore enzymes involved in lipid metabolism are putative drug targets. 

    To allow entry into different metabolic pathways and transmembrane transport, fatty acids have to be activated. This is done primarily by fatty acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs). We identified an ACS possibly involved in the bacterium’s virulence and solved its structure. Structural interpretation combined with previously reported data gives us insights into the details of its function. This enzyme is known to harbor lipid substrates longer than the enzyme itself, and we now propose how this peripheral membrane protein accommodates its substrates. 

    Some of the most chemically challenging oxidations are performed by dinuclear metalloproteins belonging to the ferritin-like superfamily. We show that the ferritin-like protein, R2lox, from M. tuberculosis contains a new type of heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor. This protein cofactor is capable of performing potent 2-electron oxidations as demonstrated by a novel tyrosine-valine crosslink observed in the protein. 

    Recently a new subclass of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) R2 proteins, was identified in the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis containing the same type of Mn/Fe cofactor mentioned above. The RNR R2 proteins use their metal site to generate a stable radical, essential for the reduction of ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms, the building blocks of DNA. With this work, we were able to characterize the architecture of this metal cofactor.

  • 7.
    Segerstolpe, Åsa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biology and Functional Genomics.
    Granneman, Sander
    Björk, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biology and Functional Genomics.
    Alves, Flavia de Lima
    Rappsilber, Juri
    Andersson, Charlotta S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Tollervey, David
    Wieslander, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biology and Functional Genomics.
    Multiple rna interactions position mrd1 at the site of the small subunit pseudoknot within the 90s pre ribosome2013In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 1178-1190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ribosomal subunit biogenesis in eukaryotes is a complex multistep process. Mrd1 is an essential and conserved small (40S) ribosomal subunit synthesis factor that is required for early cleavages in the 35S pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Yeast Mrd1 contains five RNA-binding domains (RBDs), all of which are necessary for optimal function of the protein. Proteomic data showed that Mrd1 is part of the early pre-ribosomal complexes, and deletion of individual RBDs perturbs the pre-ribosomal structure. In vivo ultraviolet cross-linking showed that Mrd1 binds to the pre-rRNA at two sites within the 18S region, in helix 27 (h27) and helix 28. The major binding site lies in h27, and mutational analyses shows that this interaction requires the RBD1-3 region of Mrd1. RBD2 plays the dominant role in h27 binding, but other RBDs also contribute directly. h27 and helix 28 are located close to the sequences that form the central pseudoknot, a key structural feature of the mature 40S subunit. We speculate that the modular structure of Mrd1 coordinates pseudoknot formation with pre-rRNA processing and subunit assembly.

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