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  • 1. Bruns, Axel
    et al.
    Enli, GunnSkogerbo, EliLarsson, Anders OlofChristensen, ChristianStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    The Routledge Companion to Social Media and Politics2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media are now widely used for political protests, campaigns, and communication in developed and developing nations, but available research has not yet paid sufficient attention to experiences beyond the US and UK. This collection tackles this imbalance head-on, compiling cutting-edge research across six continents to provide a comprehensive, global, up-to-date review of recent political uses of social media.

    Drawing together empirical analyses of the use of social media by political movements and in national and regional elections and referenda, The Routledge Companion to Social Media and Politics presents studies ranging from Anonymous and the Arab Spring to the Greek Aganaktismenoi, and from South Korean presidential elections to the Scottish independence referendum. The book is framed by a selection of keystone theoretical contributions, evaluating and updating existing frameworks for the social media age.

  • 2.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    A decade of WikiLeaks: So what?2014In: International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics, ISSN 1740-8296, E-ISSN 2040-0918, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 273-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I consider how WikiLeaks has gone through a series of metamorphoses: from a small, relatively unknown website devoted to giving whistleblowers space to release their material to one of the best-known activist organizations in the world. In addition, it has gone from being an organization that began by operating as an alternative to the mainstream media, to one that worked with the mainstream, and then to a group that devoted a fair degree of energy to attacking the media. I argue that during this tumultuous period of change, WikiLeaks needs to be understood in relation to its impact upon a number of fundamental relationships central to the study of media and journalism. I use WikiLeaks to consider the importance of studying sites and organizations as cultural artefacts, and to examine the idea that 'everything which has been collected on it, becomes attached to it-like shells on a rock by the seashore forming a whole incrustation'. Academic research itself is, of course, part of this incrustation.

  • 3.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    All politics is local: anonymous and the Steubenville/Maryville rape cases2016In: The Routledge companion to social media and politics / [ed] Axel Bruns, Gunn Enli, Eli Skogerbo, Anders Larsson, Christian Christensen, Routledge, 2016, p. 153-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    @Sweden: Curating a Nation on Twitter2013In: Popular Communication, ISSN 1540-5702, E-ISSN 1540-5710, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 30-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On December 10, 2011, the first tweet was sent out from the @Sweden Twitter account, a nation-branding project financed by the Swedish government through the Swedish Institute and VisitSweden. Trumpeted by the media both in Sweden and internationally as an exercise in “transparent” and “democratic” nation-branding via the use of Twitter, the @Sweden account is “given” to a new Swede every week, and, supposedly, these curators are given free rein to tweet what they like, when they like. The use of a popular communication channel by the Swedish government—in this case, Twitter—provides an illuminating example of the carefully planned and managed promotion and nation-branding of Sweden, presented under the guise of a “transparent” and “democratic” selection and editorial processes. The @Sweden project will be addressed in light of “liberation technology”  Diamond, L. 2010. Liberation technology. Journal of Democracy, 21(3): 69–83. and “technology discourse”         Fisher, E. 2010. perspectives, within which a correlation between access to, and use of, technology and proactive change is postulated. These theoretical perspectives are particularly valuable when heeding Kaneva's (Kaneva, N. 2011. Nation branding: Toward an agenda for critical research).  call for a more critical, communications-based understanding of nation-branding.

  • 5.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The links that bind: WikiLeaks, Twitter, and the Julian Assange case2016In: Popular Communication, ISSN 1540-5702, E-ISSN 1540-5710, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 224-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the decade since the founding of WikiLeaks, no non-leak-related issue has dominated coverage of the organization more than the August 2010 allegations made by two women in Stockholm against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. This case has been addressed on the WikiLeaks Twitter feed on a consistent basis over the past 6 years. The tweets from WikiLeaks to millions of followers constitute a form of popular communication where a broad-albeit somewhat prefigured-audience is targeted using an open social media platform. With this audience in mind, I analyze the use of Twitter by WikiLeaks to address the 2010 rape allegations against Assange ( and the subsequent follow-on events after those allegations), with a particular focus on two issues: (a) the framing by WikiLeaks of the allegations, Sweden, rape, and feminism; and (b) how the sources (links) used in those tweets to back up claims should be seen as part of the general framing process.

  • 6.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    WAVE-RIDING AND HASHTAG-JUMPING: Twitter, minority ‘third parties’ and the 2012 US elections2013In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 646-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the description of the 2012 election as the ‘most tweeted’ political event in US history in mind, considering the relative media invisibility of the so-called ‘third-party’ presidential candidates in the US election process, and utilizing the understanding of retweeting as conversational practice, the purpose of this paper is to examine the use of Twitter by the four main ‘third-party’ US presidential candidates in the run-up to the 2012 presidential election in order to better understand (1) the volume of tweets produced by the candidates; (2) the level of interaction by followers in the form of retweeting candidate/party tweets; and, (3), the subject and content of the tweets most retweeted by followers of the respective parties. The ultimate goal of the paper is to generate a broader picture of how Twitter was utilized by minority party candidates, as well as identifying the issues which led followers (and their respective followers) to engage in the ‘conversational’ act of retweeting.

  • 7.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    WikiLeaks and "Indirect" Media Reform2016In: Strategies for Media Reform: International Perspectives / [ed] Des Freedman, Jonathan Obar, Cheryl Martens, Robert W. McChesney, Fordham University Press, 2016, p. 58-71Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    WikiLeaks and the afterlife of Collateral Murder2014In: WikiLeaks: from popular culture to political economy / [ed] Christian Christensen, Los Angeles: USC Annenberg Press , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    WikiLeaks and the Afterlife of Collateral Murder2014In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 8, p. 2593-2602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay, the author considers not only what is shown in the WikiLeaks Collateral Murder video but reflects upon what the act of uploading this video symbolized and continues to symbolize and how the multifaceted symbolic value of the video has led to its steady inscription and reinscription into the public consciousness during a wide variety of popular and political debates. Apart from the disturbing content of the film, showing a potentially criminal act, the author argues that the uploading of the film was itself an act of dissent and, thus, a challenge to U.S. power. This combination of content and context makes the WikiLeaks Collateral Murder video an interesting case study that touches upon several key areas within academic study.

  • 10.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    WikiLeaks: From Popular Culture to Political Economy2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Christensen, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Jónsdóttir, Birgitta
    WikiLeaks, Transparency, and Privacy: A Discussion with Birgitta Jónsdóttir2014In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 8, p. 2558-2566Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Birgitta Jónsdóttir is currently a member of the Icelandic Parliament, where she represents the Pirate Party. Jónsdóttir was an early WikiLeaks volunteer and was one of the key members of the team in Iceland that put together the famous Collateral Murder video. In this wide-ranging discussion with Christian Christensen, Jónsdóttir talks about her work with WikiLeaks, politics, and her ideas about technology, transparency, and privacy. She also discusses how she has been placed under surveillance because of her work with WikiLeaks and other organizations.

  • 12.
    Christensen, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Jónsdóttir, Birgitta
    WikiLeaks, transparency and privacy: a discussion with Birgitta Jónsdóttir2014In: WikiLeaks: from popular culture to political economy / [ed] Christian Christensen, Los Angeles: USC Annenberg Press , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The Arab Spring As Meta-Event and Communicative Spaces2013In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 351-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa, immediately labeled the Arab Spring, are best described as processes rather than outcomes. Despite being a common area of media focus due to decades-long geopolitics, the Arab Spring, as a mediatized meta-event, has led to the reemergence of the region as a discursive territory. The communicative spaces that opened up during and in the aftermath of the uprisings allowed for a multiplicity of topics to reenter public discourse across local, national, and transnational scales. In the process, seasoned debates such as religious sectarianism and democratic institutionalization gained magnitude. More specific debates such as Turkey's role as a model/antimodel added new discursive aspects to the multitopic ensemble. The purpose of this article is to reflect on the communicative and scalar dimensions in the mediation of the Arab Spring by way of taking the debates on Turkey as a case in point.

  • 14. Larsson, Anders Olof
    et al.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    From showroom to chat room: SVT on social media during the 2014 Swedish elections2017In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 587-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whilst social media like Twitter and Facebook carry with them the potential for the practice of journalism, novelties like these are also associated with adaptation difficulties - perhaps especially when it comes to the interactive capabilities that services like these afford. This study employs a multi-method approach to study the different uses of Twitter and Facebook by one media company - the Swedish public service broadcaster (PSB) Sveriges Television - during the 2014 election year. Utilizing both quantitative and qualitative data, we find that Twitter was used more extensively and in a comparably more interactive fashion than Facebook. Hence we suggest Twitter, used more for interaction, functions as a chat room'; whilst Facebook, used more for broadcasting messages, can be viewed as functioning like a showroom'. As Twitter is often associated with societal elites in the Swedish context, it raises a question about the suitability for a PSB to engage to such a degree on this particular platform.

  • 15. Larsson, Anders Olof
    et al.
    Kalsnes, Bente
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    ELITE INTERACTION Public service broadcasters' use of Twitter during national elections in Norway and Sweden2017In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 1137-1157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While a good deal of research has examined the uses of Twitter in journalism, comparably few research projects employ comparative research designs in order to provide new insights. The present study details Twitter use by public service broadcasters (PSBs) during recent national elections in Norway and Sweden. Utilizing quantitative analysis of social media content in tandem with qualitative interviews with key PSB journalists, the main results indicate that while the PSB organizations-the Norwegian NRK and the Swedish SVT-are both frequently contacted by regular citizens on Twitter, they seem to prefer to retweet and interact with journalists, politicians or other elite users. Compared with the interviews performed, the study uncovers an interesting tension as journalists often talk about the need to engage with regular users-a practice that is arguably in line with PSB regulations, but that is seldom adhered to in the contexts studied here.

1 - 15 of 15
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