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  • 1. Bucci, Alessandro
    et al.
    Faggella, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Parallel universes: Fashion studies education today2018In: International Journal of Fashion Studies, ISSN 2051-7114, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 149-155Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Faggella, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Editorial Foreword2019In: Film Fashion and Consumption, ISSN 2044-2823, E-ISSN 2044-2831, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Faggella, ChiaraStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Interdisciplinary approaches to the study of moving images and fashion2019Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genesis of this special issue of Film, Fashion and Consumption can be traced back to 2015 when, as Ph.D. students interested in the combined study of fashion and film, we took the ambitious project of organizing a one-day symposium at the former Centre for Fashion Studies (IMS), Stockholm University. The enthusiastic response from scholars who participated promoted compelling and thought-provoking discussions in the full day of panels that ensued. The symposium, under the title Exploring the Intersections of Fashion and Film Studies, was held on 6 November 2015 at Filmhuset in Stockholm. It brought together archivists, film, fashion and media scholars from leading institutions, coming from different backgrounds but sharing this dedicated interest. The aim of the symposium was to discuss and reflect about the complex manner in which our areas of study overlap and intertwine, and the potential to produce scholarly work. In addition, the open nature of the event gave film, fashion and media students of all levels an opportunity to learn from, and interact with, some of the most prominent scholars in these areas of study.

  • 4.
    Faggella, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Film, Fashion, and the 1960s, Eugenia Paulicelli, Drake Stutesman and Louise Wallenberg (eds) (2017)2019In: Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies, ISSN 2047-7368, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 315-318Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Faggella, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Itinerari di moda fiorentina fra il dopoguerra e la fine degli anni sessanta: dal guardaroba alla memoria storica2016In: Moda, città e immaginari / [ed] Alessandra Vaccari, Milano: Mimesis edizioni, 2016, p. 148-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Faggella, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Lifestyle and fashion in Mario Camerini’s romantic comedies Il Signor Max and I Grandi Magazzini2018In: Networking Knowledge: Journal of the MeCCSA Postgraduate Network, ISSN 1755-9944, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 56-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between the years 1922 and 1943, Italian Fascism revealed quite an ambivalent attitude towards lifestyle. While the regime tried to impose standards of nationalistic moderation, popular entertainment of the time reveals that different aspects of culture never surrendered completely to the diktats of the regime. This article discusses the ways in which two films, Il Signor Max (Astra Film, 1937) and I Grandi Magazzini (Amato-Era Film, 1939) can provide a perspective into the consumer culture of Fascist Italy and its ambivalences. By presenting recurrent references to lifestyle commodities and fashion, the experiences of consumption in the two films take center stage in spite of the regime’s campaigns for modesty.

  • 7.
    Faggella, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    "Not So Simple": Reassessing 1951, G.B. Giorgini and the launch of Italian fashion2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation aims to shed light on the circumstances that allowed Italy to become a reputable country of origin in the international fashion market. In particular, my contribution to the historiography of Italian fashion is a reassessment of the role played by Giovanni Battista Giorgini, whose involvement with the fashion and handicraft industries has not been fully investigated by scholars so far. Drawing upon Marc Bloch’s paradigm against the “fetish of the single cause”, I argue that the historiography of Italian fashion is not so simple and linear as it has been presented so far. Instead, the appearance of Giorgini’s Italian High Fashion Shows from 1951 needs to be contextualized with other historical facts. By outlining a populous scenario of different actors and concurring events, this dissertation breaks away from the simplistic notion of Italian fashion being born overnight in 1951.

    Chapter one discusses the ways in which the idea of an Italian look emerged in the US press already before the end of World War II, and identifies the linguistic and visual features that characterized these earliest reports. Chapter two discusses the contributions to the promotion of Italian fashion merchandise in the United States by Max Ascoli, an antifascist Italian émigré who moved to New York in the late 1930s. His philanthropic involvement with the Italian handicraft industry is discussed in order to understand how the US market's faith in Italian goods had to be restored in relation to the perceived quality of exported goods. Chapter three focuses on Giovanni Battista Giorgini, presents a critical overview of his biography and identifies his earliest attempts at promoting Italian products to US and Canadian markets. Particular emphasis is given to Giorgini's role as an employee of the Allied Forces during the Allied occupation of Florence, and to the overlapping vicissitudes of his work with an American touring exhibition, Italy at Work, initiated by Ascoli. Chapter four discusses the activities of Giorgini’s competitors in Italy, that is agencies, associations and individuals that were operating in postwar times to export Italian fashion in the United States. Chapter five finally discusses the organization of Giorgini’s Italian High Fashion Shows in Florence between 1951 and 1953, the organization of his business venture and the ways in which the Shows solidified earlier representations of Italian fashion in the US press, becoming a benchmark for years to come.

    This study concludes that the historicisation of Giorgini, and his contribution to the promotion of Italy as an independent, non-derivative fashion market for export, was made possible thanks to a larger network of transatlantic actors that, immediately after World War II, strove for the same business goals. Eventually, this dissertation provides a historical perspective that defies the simplistic categorization of the past in straight compartments, in this case blurring the margins between Fascist and liberated, democratic Italy.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-01-11 09:00
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