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  • 1.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Acting with Technology: Rehearsing for Mixed-Media Live Performances2016In: CHI '16 Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 864-875Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital technologies provide theater with new possibilities for combining traditional stage-based performances with interactive artifacts, for streaming remote parallel performances and for other device facilitated audience interaction. Compared to traditional theater, mixed-media performances require a different type of engagement from the actors and rehearsing is challenging, as it can be impossible to rehearse with all the functional technology and interaction. Here, we report experiences from a case study of two mixed-media performances; we studied the rehearsal practices of two actors who were performing in two different plays. We describe how the actors practiced presence during rehearsal in a play where they would be geographically remote, and we describe the challenges of rehearsing with several remote and interactive elements. Our study informs the broader aims of interactive and mixed media performances through addressing critical factors of implementing technology into rehearsal practices.

  • 2.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ekenberg, Love
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Forsberg, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sauter, Willmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Interactive Performances as a Means of Social Participation and Democratic Dialogue2014In: International Reports on Socio-Informatics (IRSI), ISSN 1861-4280, E-ISSN 1861-4280, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this position paper we present our ongoing research in relation to cultivating democracy and civic participation through the writing and performance of interactive theater experiences1. We provide an example of a performance that facilitates audience participation through expression and sharing of opinions and emotions, by means of digital technologies. The performance leads to further discussion within the community and inspires more artistic and theatrical experiences in this context.

  • 3.
    Berns, Katie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    From Commodities to Gifts: Redistributing Surplus Food Locally2019In: Ethnographies of Collaborative Economies Conference Proceedings / [ed] Penny Travlou, Luigina Ciolfi, 2019, article id 12Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the practices and dynamics of a grassroots initiative that takes a non-monetary sharing approach to the issue of food surplus. Food sharing Copenhagen (FS-CPH) is a community-led, volunteer-run organisation working towards reducing food waste by collecting surplus food from supermarkets, bakeries, and private individuals and redistributing it locally, for free. The analysis illustrates the practices of the three main working groups within the organisation, the role of technology within the organization, and how food is framed through a community economies approach.

  • 4. Canova Calori, Ilaria
    et al.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Divitini, Monica
    Understanding Trajectories of Experience in Situated Learning Field Trips2012In: ICWL 2012: The 11th International Conference on Web-based Learning, Local Workshop Proceedings / [ed] Dickson Chiu, Elvira Popescu, Qing Li, Berlin, Heidelberg: Elsevier, 2012, p. 11-20Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the role context plays in promoting engagement and exploration in situated learning experiences during field trips. We look at field trips where children engage with the physical and social environment in order to learn about cultural and social aspects of the city they live in. By drawing on empirical data collected by means of qualitative methods, we discuss how learning unfolds along trajectories of experience towards pre-defined and emerging learning objectives. We reflect of the role technology can play in sup-porting learning experiences outside the classroom.

  • 5. Canova Calori, Ilaria
    et al.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Monica, Divitini
    Understanding Trajectories of Experience in Situated Learning Field Trips2013In: Interaction Design and Architecture(s), ISSN 2283-2998, Vol. 16, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the role context plays in promoting engagement and exploration in situated learning experiences during field trips. We look at field trips where children engage with the physical and social environment in order to learn about cultural and social aspects of the city they live in. By drawing on empirical data collected by means of qualitative methods, we discuss how learning unfolds along trajectories of experience towards pre-defined and emerging learning objectives. We reflect of the role technology can play in supporting learning experiences outside the classroom.

  • 6.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Understanding Audience Participation in Interactive Theater Performances2014In: Proceeding NordiCHI '14 Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: fun, Fast, Foundational, New York: ACM Press, 2014, p. 608-617Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an empirical study investigating audience participation in an interactive theater performance. During the performance, audience members were enticed to act upon and contribute to the performance by sharing their opinions, emotions, values and other thoughts, by means of text messages that were integrated into the performance itself. The study aimed at understanding the main characteristics of audience participation in the interactive performance, as well as the role of communication technology as a medium enabling social participation. The results draw attention to the immediate and reflective facets of audience participation, both unfolding at two different but interrelated levels of interactions: an individual and collective one.

  • 7. Fabiano Pinatti de Carvalho, Aparecido
    et al.
    Rossitto, ChiaraStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Lampinen, AiriStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Luigina, CiolfiGray, Breda
    Proceedings of the ECSCW 2017 Workshop on “Nomadic Cultures Beyond Work Practices”2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this issue we explore the conceptual, analytical and design challenges inherent in the notion of “Nomadic Culture”. The papers included highlight how research on mobility has contributed to the CSCW community, while pointing to unsolved problems, future challenges and research agendas. We see this collection of papers as developing a more holistic perspective on nomadic culture, and connecting this scholarship with recent research on sharing and exchange platforms as sites of work. This intervention contributes to an understanding of nomadic culture by providing a more contemporary perspective on the social and cultural aspects of workplace sites and co-working practices.

  • 8. Grönvall, Erik
    et al.
    Ciolfi, Luigina
    Avram, Gabriela
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Cornell Tech, New York City, USA.
    HCI at the Boundary of Work and Life2016In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 481-485Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea behind this Special Issue originates in a workshop on HCI and CSCW research related to work and non-work-life balance organized in conjunction with the ECSCW 2013 conference by the issue co-editors. Fifteen papers were originally submitted for possible inclusion in this Special Issue, and four papers were finally accepted for publication after two rounds of rigorous peer review. The four accepted papers explore, in different ways, HCI at the boundary of work and life. In this editorial, we offer a description of the overall theme and rationale for the Special Issue, including an introduction on the topic relevance and background, and a reflection on how the four accepted papers further current research and debate on the topic.

  • 9.
    Hernwall, Patrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    “Making sense of your life”. Upper Secondary Students on their University Studies2015In: NERA 2015 - Marketisation and Differentiation in Education: Abstract Book, 2015, p. 178-178Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall theme of this presentation is how especially highly motivated upper secondary students perceive and understand universities in general and university studies in particular. The presentation will contribute to the an understanding of university studies as part of a global change of education from the perspective of upper secondary students; moreover, it will address how such a change intertwines with the transformation of the elementary and upper secondary educational systems, and the evermore present and used ICTs in contemporary education. These changes in the formal educational system in general, and the challenges that imply for higher education in particular, will serve as a backdrop for the analysis of the interviews. IT will also be used in the concluding reflections on how higher education is perceived by a group of upper secondary students. The empirical material was collected by means of semi-structured interviews with six upper secondary students attending an international program in a school located in the southern part of the greater Stockholm area. Two main themes emerge from the analysis. The first concerns the reasons and motivations for enrolling in a university program. The second one relates to the expectations connected to studying at the university, a theme that to a large extent revolves around expectations on the teacher-student relationships; a relationship the participants regarded as paramount of the new educational context they were about to enter.

  • 10.
    Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Franzén, Christofer
    The Hoffice Network: Socio-Technical Innovation for Sustainable Self-Organizing Communities2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Gradin Franzén, Christofer
    Scaling Out, Scaling Down: Reconsidering growth in grassroots initiatives2019In: Ethnographies of Collaborative Economies Conference Proceedings / [ed] Penny Travlou, Luigina Ciolfi, 2019, article id 2Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we reflect on how scaling out – recreating and reconfiguring horizontally the most promising practices across contexts (Manzini, 2015) – can help local, grassroots initiatives to grow in a socially sustainable fashion and to sustain their action over time. We ground our discussion on the case of Hoffice, a self-organizing network that is experimenting with an alternative social model for collectively organizing and supporting flexible forms of work. In a prior ethnographic study of the Hoffice network (Rossitto & Lampinen, 2018), we outlined the socio-technical practices and values that characterise this community. We complement this previous piece by zooming in on the community’s struggles in the face of rapid growth. We conclude by proposing a way to rethink the challenges that growth can pose.

  • 12. Luigina, Ciolfi
    et al.
    Avram, Gabriela
    Grönvall, Erik
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    CSCW at the Boundary of Work and Life2013In: ECSCW 2013 Adjunct Proceedings: The 13th European Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work / [ed] Matthias Korn, Tommaso Colombino, Myriam Lewkowicz, Århus: Department of Computer Science, Aarhus University , 2013, p. 84-89Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This ECSCW 2013 workshop discusses the topic of extending and applying CSCW themes, concepts and sensibilities to practices at the boundary between work and life. We provide a rationale for the workshop, grounded on the need to extend current work examining the blurring between work and non-work activities, and also to look at design approaches to address this through collaborative technology. The paper also includes information on the program for this event and biographical details of the proposers.

  • 13.
    Nouri, Jalal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Learning with or without mobile devices? A comparison of traditional school field trips and inquiry-based mobile learning activities2014In: Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning, ISSN 1793-7078, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 241-262Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hoffice: Social Innovation through Sustainable Communities, Collaboration grant SA2016-212019Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Maryam: Blending drama into the cityscape2013In: Women in Science, Stockholm: Styx , 2013, p. 71-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Engström, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Interweaving place and story in a location-based audio drama2016In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 245-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a qualitative study of an interactive audio drama facilitated by a location-based application. The investigation focuses on an accessible experience, a play in which the audience members simply trigger new scenes of the audio drama as they walk to predefined city areas. The findings draw attention to the role of the mobile technology in facilitating this particular artistic experience. Furthermore, they illustrate the various levels at which creative imagination and open interpretation emerge as audience members seek to make sense of the interrelations between the locative media experienced and elements of the places inhabited during the audio narrative. In concluding the article, designing for loose coupling between mobile media and physical places is suggested as a strategy to enable people's engagement in meaningful experience through the use of various location-based services.

  • 17.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    Severinsson-Eklundh, Kerstin
    Understanding constellations of technologies in use in a collaborative nomadic setting2014In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work, ISSN 0925-9724, E-ISSN 1573-7551, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 137-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how people make sense of and use constellations of technologies in a nomadic setting. Particular attention is drawn to how the situated orchestration of devices and applications within a constellation reflects university students’ concern to manage their projects at a number of locations, and to create places amenable to their activities. By drawing on data collected by means of qualitative methods, we address collaborative issues inherent in the negotiated use of a particular technology, as well as aspects related to individuals’ experience of place in relation to the specific activities they engage with, and the other people involved. The analysis also brings into focus how constellations of technologies emerge and dissolve within collaborative ensembles that only exist within the short timeframe of a project, and how this can cause appropriation problems within a group. In concluding this article, we reflect on how taking into account the problems observed calls for a need to designing for constellations of technologies and, thus, rethinking interaction models with and between technologies.

  • 18.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Situating Nomadic Writing: The Materiality of Places2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the extensive body of publications exploring the potential of mobile devices in learning settings, little research is today concerned with how issues of mobility and place shape high-demanding cognitive activities such as writing. This paper investigates mobile learning practices while university students write technical reports collaboratively. The paper draws on a body of HCI research that seeks to elucidate how the growing use of ubiquitous and mobile technologies redefines our relationtionship and experience of place and time. While such technologies and applications allow people to be mobile and engage with activities at a variety of physical locations, understanding their use raises analytical issues concerning the situated nature of the very practices mobile technologies facilitate. According to Dourish (2006), for instance, when the technologies of interest are portable, distributed and embedded in our physical and social environment (i.e. wireless services), it becomes central to understand how such technologies transform people’s interactions with a specific location (i.e. how they navigate or represent it), or how they can enable a meaningful engagement with a given physical environment. This, in turn, draws attention to the social, emotional and corporeal aspects concerned with people’s experience of being in place, rather than merely investigating the physical affordance determined by its structural dimension (McCarthy et al., 2005). This paper investigates the role of physical place in the context of mobile learning activities. More specifically, it focuses on reciprocal transactions between places occupied, technologies used and the specific activities undertaken. Our interest in place is, therefore, tightly interwoven with the use of technologies, how they are appropriated in the context of the group activities to distribute the various writing tasks to a number of different locations, and to practically turn locations into appropriate places for writing. In terms of analysis, this entails to draw attention to writers’ psychological, social and practical orientation to the places they occupy, and not merely to their writing tools and resource, tasks and objective. Our interest in understanding the materiality of place, and the different ways in which it can practically shape the mobile collaborative writing activities, draws therefore on the idea that place does not merely entail geometrical and physical properties, but it also encompasses facets of human experience and activities within it. The empirical material examined comes from two investigations of university students engaged in collaborative writing activities within two different courses. The theoretical approach chosen for the examination of the materiality of place, and how issues of mobility reflect on writing, is grounded in Casey’s phenomenological theorization of “place”. The analysis of the data shows the role of physical environments and contexts on mobile collaborative writing activities. These results contribute to a move away from the conception of mobile learning occurring anytime and anywhere. Instead it call for an understanding of the material “here” and “now” of a particular “mobile” collaborative writing activities.

  • 19.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Smart Cities as New Places for New People2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our contribution to this workshop consists of a number of ideas we believe are worth investigating within the ongoing discourse on Smart Cities. In so doing, we seek to address issues of informal, lifelong learning within cities, and to draw attention to the role technology could play in encouraging inter-cultural communication and a common sense of belonging.

  • 20.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sustainability in Education: Challenges and Open Issues2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a project proposal that contextualizes sustainability in educational settings, particularly intergenerational learning of sustainable environmental practices. It raises questions concerned with the role that groups and institutions, learning, and a care for place can play in developing awareness about sustainability.

  • 21.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hernwall, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Collin, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Beyond Pedagogical Challenges: Addressing The Social Aspects around the Use of Digital Resources in University Education2015In: Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: The Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference 2015: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Oskar Lindwall, Päivi Häkkinen, Timothy Koschmann, Pierre Tchounikine, Sten Ludvigsen, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2015, Vol. 1, p. 118-125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results of a qualitative study in which the challenges of adopting and adapting digital media to the context of higher education were investigated. A workshop attended by university teachers and professional producers of educational video material was organized. The analysis draws attention to issues concerning the quality of digital media, the development of the professional skills required to produce and use them, and the orchestration of learning activities centered on such learning resources. The paper argues that understanding the challenges around the appropriation of digital media in educational settings encompasses the social and contextual aspects of the settings in which technology is to be used, and not merely the pedagogical concerns underlying its usage.

  • 22.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Co-Creating the Workplace: Participatory Efforts to Enable Individual Work at the Hoffice2018In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work (online), ISSN 0925-9724, E-ISSN 1573-7551, Vol. 27, no 3-6, p. 947-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the self-organizing network Hoffice – a merger between the words home and office – that brings together people who wish to co-create temporary workplaces. The Hoffice concept entails a co-working methodology, and a set of practices inherent in opening up one’s home as a temporary, shared workplace, with the help of existing social media platforms, particularly Facebook. We discuss both the practices of co-creating temporary workplaces, particularly for workers who lack a stable office and orchestrate flexible work arrangements, and the values and rhetoric enshrined in Hoffice. We collected our research materials through interviews, participant observation, and workshops. Our findings draw attention to i) the practical arrangement of Hoffice events, ii) the participatory efforts to get individual work done, and 3) the co-creation of an alternative social model that encourages trust, self-actualization, and openness. To conclude, we discuss how Hoffice is already making change for its members, and how this is indicative of a politics of care. We contribute to research on computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) by highlighting grassroots efforts to create alternative ways of organizing nomadic work and navigating non-traditional employment arrangements.

  • 23.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Franzén, Christofer
    HOffice: Social Innovation through Sustainable Nomadic Community2017In: International Reports on Socio-Informatics (IRSI), ISSN 1861-4280, E-ISSN 1861-4280, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an ongoing ethnographic study of the Hoffice Network in Stockholm, Sweden. The concept Hoffice (Home + Office) relates to the emerging phenomenon of people opening up their homes as shared workplaces, and to the related organizational framework enabling the creation of co-working spaces. We focus on sharing and caring as two overarching values emerging from our preliminary data analysis. In doing so, we discuss three main themes characterizing the socio-cultural practices around the Hoffice, namely: a concern for other people, a concern for implicit norms and cultural aspects inherent in the Hoffice structure, and the role of the facilitators and organizers in making Hoffice a sustainable, self-organizing practice. These themes allow us to develop an initial understanding of the notion of nomadic culture and to connect it to a view of the collaborative economy that values sense of community, mutual trust, support and continuity over time.

  • 24.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Luigina, CiolfiMartin, DavidConein, Bernard
    COOP 2014 - Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on the Design of Cooperative Systems, 27-30 May 2014, Nice (France)2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Normark, Maria
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Interactive Performance as a Means of Civic Dialogue2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 4850-4862Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case study of an interactive performance that was produced and designed to encourage civic engagement and reflection in relation to the social tensions in a low-income suburb, mostly inhabited by people with immigrant backgrounds. The design of the technological setup in the performance encouraged participation by means of text entries that audience members could share with others. The analysis draws on the corpus of interview and observational data collected, as well as the related text messages that were shared during the performance. We illustrate the different levels at which citizens make sense of societal issues they are concerned about, as well as the audience-citizens' perception of participating in such an artistic experience.

  • 26.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rostami, Asreen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Fischione, Carlo
    Turchet, Luca
    Musicians' initial encounters with a smart guitar2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 13-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case study of a fully working prototype of the Sensus smart guitar. Eleven professional guitar players were interviewed after a prototype test session. The smartness of the guitar was perceived as enabling the integration of a range of equipment into a single device, and the proactive exploration of novel expressions. The results draw attention to the musicians' sense-making of the smart qualities, and to the perceived impact on their artistic practices. The themes highlight how smartness was experienced in relation to the guitar's agency and the skills it requires, the tension between explicit (e.g. playing a string) and implicit (e.g. keeping rhythm) body movements, and to performing and producing music. Understanding this felt sense of smartness is relevant to how contemporary HCI research conceptualizes mundane artefacts enhanced with smart technologies, and to how such discourse can inform related design issues.

  • 27.
    Rostami, Asreen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Bio-Sensed and Embodied Participation in Interactive Performance2017In: Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 197-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing for interactive performances is challenging both in terms of technology design, and of understanding the interplay between technology, narration, and audience interactions. Bio-sensors and bodily tracking technologies afford new ways for artists to engage with audiences, and for audiences to become part of the artwork. Their deployment raises a number of issues for designers of interactive performances. This paper explores such issues by presenting five design ideas for interactive performance afforded by bio-sensing and bodily tracking (i.e. Microsoft Kinect) developed during two design workshops. We use these ideas, and the related scenarios to discuss three emerging issues namely: temporality of input, autonomy and control, and visibility of input in relation to the deployment of bio-sensors and bodily tracking technologies in the context of interactive performances.

  • 28.
    Rostami, Asreen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Hook, Jonathan
    Taylor, Robyn
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spence, Jocelyn
    Williamson, Julie
    Design Fiction for Mixed-Reality Performances2017In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 498-505Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing for mixed-reality performances is challenging both in terms of technology design, and in terms of understanding the interplay between technology, narration, and (the outcomes of) audience interactions. This complexity also stems from the variety of roles in the creative team often entailing technology designers, artists, directors, producers, set-designers and performers. In this multidisciplinary, one-day workshop, we seek to bring together HCI scholars, designers, artists, and curators to explore the potential provided by Design Fiction as a method to generate ideas for Mixed-Reality Performance (MRP) through various archetypes including scripts, programs, and posters. By drawing attention to novel interactive technologies, such as bio-sensors and environmental IoT, we seek to generate design fiction scenarios capturing the aesthetic and interactive potential for mixed-reality performances, as well as the challenges to gain access to audience members' data -- i.e. physiological states, daily routines, conversations, etc.

  • 29.
    Rostami, Asreen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spence, Jocelyn
    Taylor, Robyn
    Hook, Jonathan
    Williamson, Julie
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Glimpses of the future: designing fictions for mixed-reality performances2018In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 46-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Rostami, Asreen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Waern, Annika
    Frictional Realities: Enabling Immersion in Mixed-Reality Performances2018In: Proceedings of the 2018 ACM International Conference on Interactive Experiences for TV and Online Video, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 15-27Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case study of a Mixed-Reality Performance employing 360-degree video for a virtual reality experience. We repurpose the notions of friction to illustrate the different threads at which priming is enacted during the performance to create an immersive audience experience. We look at aspects of friction between the different layers of the Mixed-Reality Performance, namely: temporal friction, friction between the physical and virtual presence of the audience, and friction between realities. We argue that Mixed-Reality Performances that employ immersive technology, do not need to rely on its presumed immersive nature to make the performance an engaging or coherent experience. Immersion, in such performances, emerges from the audience' transition towards a more active role, and the creation of various fictional realities through frictions.

  • 31.
    Rostami, Asreen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Waern, Annika
    Frictional Realities in Mixed-Reality Performances2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mixed-Reality Performances that employ immersive technology, do not need to rely on its presumed immersive nature to make the performance an engaging or coherent experience. Immersion in such performances emerges from the audience’ transition towards a more active role in the performance and by creating different realities through frictions.

1 - 31 of 31
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