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  • 1.
    Alexius, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Mission(s) impossible? Configuring values in the governance of state-owned enterprises2015In: International Journal of Public Sector Management, ISSN 0951-3558, E-ISSN 1758-6666, Vol. 28, no 4-5, p. 286-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contribute to theory of hybrid organizations, with particular regard to state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and their ability to contribute to sustaining value pluralism in the public sector.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper offers a qualitative case concerning ongoing performance management reforms in the corporate governance of SOEs in Sweden, which is analyzed using theory on valuation and evaluation.

    Findings – It is found that the number of non-financial values is reduced with reference to categorization. Attempts are made to change the perception of the potential value conflict at hand between financial and non-financial missions by adding a number of neutralizing “meta values” such as transparency and efficiency to the performance language in use. There is a risk of mission drift as a clear hierarchization of values, prioritizing financial values, is created and sustained in “investment teams.” Processes, standards and dialogues are all dominated by an economic logic despite formal aspirations to balance the values at stake. The few remaining non-financial values are translated into economic language aiming for a commensuration of the performance of the different missions. In addition, the ambition of the public policy assignment may be further reduced by de-coupling.

    Originality/value – The paper suggests a novel approach to hybrid organizations in general and SOEs in particular when exploring how the values underlying complex missions are configured in “value work” performed by government officials in Swedish government offices. Such analyses of value work in the micro-practice of hybrids offer a more fine-grained understanding of organizational dilemmas that are commonly acknowledged, but more seldom explained in empirical detail.

  • 2.
    Alexius, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Grossi, Giuseppe
    Logics and mechanisms of board appointment in hybrid organizations2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The relevance of the paper to the panel topic 

    The management and governance of hybrid organizations involve a range of challenges and critical issues. One such issue concerns the people that embody the hybrid and their capabilities to represent and handle the complex missions and potential value conflicts at stake in a hybrid organization. Looking closer at processes of recruitment and nomination of key actors such as CFOs, managers and board members is relevant as it sheds light on high held ideals for hybrid management and governance and the human resources seen fit to handle complex hybrid missions.

    The significance of the research (why it is distinctive and its contribution to the field)

    Our case gives a micro illustration of the governance challenges involved in attempts to design the nomination process to reflect a wider range of goals and values. We also wish to briefly discuss how this shift in appointment logics – from “political discretion” (PA), over “professionalism as in efficiency and economization” (NPM) to “political correctness” (NPG) may affect the boards and management of the SOEs.

    The research question(s) and method

    The Swedish state has an outspoken aim to be an “active and professional” owner by generating economic value in its 49 state-owned enterprises. At the same time, there is a political ambition for these firms to be seen as national and international “role models”, in the forefront of gender equality and sustainability. In addition, for about 25 SOEs, there are specifically Government commissioned social “public policy assignments” to be taken into consideration. The aim of this paper is to analyse the logics (political vs. professional) in the Swedish Government offices concerning the mechanisms of appointment of board members of Swedish State-owned Enterprises (SOEs) with Government commissioned social public policy assignments.

    Findings are based on qualitative analyses of documents, observations and interviews with key actors. Focusing foremost on the daily work of civil servants responsible for board nomination in the Ministry of Commerce and Innovation the study also acknowledges the role of external head hunters and executive search firms, politically appointed civil servants, politicians and board chairs and members in the nomination process.

    The theoretical/conceptual foundations for the research

    The backdrop to our case story is the historical transition from traditional Public Administration (PA), over new public management (NPM) regimes to the emerging post-NPM era of “New Public Governance” (Osborne, 2010; Almqvist et al., 2003; Ivarsson Westernberg, 2017), their dominant institutional logics and the effects on the appointment of public representatives, such as board members of SOEs.

    The results to be reported

    Our claim is that in the emerging NPG era, the previously dominating professional (and typically economical) logic of NPM-inspired governance of State-owned enterprises is challenged. Public appointment officials now face increasing external pressure to demonstrate that the multiple social values at stake for the hybrid organizations are reflected in the nomination of their board members, without compromising business efficiency, public accountability and the public income derived from SOEs.

  • 3. Allamani, Allaman
    et al.
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Kuenig, Hervé
    Report of an analysis of European alcohol-related cultural, social and policy interactions and their impact on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm: Deliverable 3.2, Work Package 3, Cultural determinants of alcohol policy2013Report (Other academic)
  • 4. Allamani, Allaman
    et al.
    Voller, Fabio
    Decarli, Adriano
    Casotto, Veronica
    Pantzer, Karin
    Anderson, Peter
    Gual, Antoni
    Matrai, Silvia
    Elekes, Zsuzsanna
    Eisenbach-Stangl, Irmgard
    Schmied, Gabriele
    Knibbe, Ronald A.
    Nordlund, Sturla
    Skjælaaen, Øystein
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Österberg, Esa
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Plant, Martin
    Plant, Moira
    Miller, Patrick
    Coghill, Nikki
    Świątkiewicz, Grażyna
    Wieczorek, Lukasz
    Annaheim, Beatrice
    Gmel, Gerhard
    Contextual Determinants of Alcohol Consumption Changes and Preventive Alcohol Policies: A 12-Country European Study in Progress 20112011In: Substance Use & Misuse, ISSN 1082-6084, E-ISSN 1532-2491, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 1288-1303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beginning with France in the 1950s, alcohol consumption has decreased in Southern European countries with few or no preventive alcohol policy measures being implemented, while alcohol consumption has been increasing in Northern European countries where historically more restrictive alcohol control policies were in place, even though more recently they were loosened. At the same time, Central and Eastern Europe have shown an intermediate behavior. We propose that country-specific changes in alcohol consumption between 1960 and 2008 are explained by a combination of a number of factors: (1) preventive alcohol policies and (2) social, cultural, economic, and demographic determinants. This article describes the methodology of a research study designed to understand the complex interactions that have occurred throughout Europe over the past five decades. These include changes in alcohol consumption, drinking patterns and alcohol-related harm, and the actual determinants of such changes

  • 5.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    A solitary case: Swedish tobacco policy as harm reduction?2013In: Drugs and alcohol today, ISSN 1745-9265, E-ISSN 2042-8359, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 102-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to analyse Swedish tobacco policy, especially in relation to EU tobacco regulation. The paper also seeks to review the arguments and the scientific support presented in the debate around Swedish snus, setting it in the context of future EU regulation on tobacco.

    Design/methodology/approach – The article draws on previous research, official documents and newspaper articles to examine tobacco policy development on a national and EU level.

    Findings – The paper shows that the so-called Swedish experience has led to a somewhat ambivalent political attitude towards tobacco policy. The Swedish case of snus also demonstrates the EU as a political and regulatory force in national policymaking and how different economic and political interests are using scientifically based arguments to advance goals of their own. The paper argues that political measures are dictated by ideology and political considerations, which are themselves supported by ambiguous scientific results. Harm reduction is used as a political tool in a debate which extends well beyond public health concerns.

    Originality/value – This paper contributes to research on tobacco policy in general and on Swedish snus in particular. The paper also puts the snus question in a broader context of national public health policy and EU regulation.

  • 6.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol policy in the European Union2012In: European Union Public Health Policy: Regional and global trends / [ed] Scott L. Greer, Paulette Kurtzer, London & New York: Routledge, 2012, p. 168-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Customer satisfaction over patient securyty? Value hierarchization in pharmaceutical retail2014In: Configuring Value Conflicts in Markets / [ed] Kristina Tamm Hallström, Susanna Alexius, Cheltenham,: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 43-62Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Escaping deadlock - alcohol policy-making in the EU2009In: Journal of European Public Policy, ISSN 1350-1763, E-ISSN 1466-4429, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 755-773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the cultural and ideological diversity of the member states when it comes to alcohol, several alcohol-related initiatives have been taken recently at the EU level. The purpose of this article is to analyse the development of two of these initiatives: the Council Recommendation of 5 June 2001 on the drinking of alcohol by young people, and the invitation from the Council to the Commission to develop a Community Alcohol Strategy, both adopted during the Swedish Presidency in 2001. Drawing from Hritier's work on escaping deadlock it is argued that EU decisions on alcohol policy were made possible by using four strategies: priority, anchorage, lowest common denominator and baby steps. In cases of weak EU supranational competence the possibilities of escaping deadlock differ somewhat from cases of strong legislative competence and the strategies of priority and anchorage seem to be of particular importance for questions based on soft law decision-making.

  • 9.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Innanför och utanför nationens gränser: svensk alkoholpolitik i förändring2012In: Samhället, alkoholen och drogerna: Politik, konstruktioner och dilemman / [ed] Jessica Storbjörk, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2012, p. 71-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sedan Sverige gick med i den Europeiska Unionen (EU) har den nationella alkoholpolitiken genomgått stora förändringar. Detta har setts som en tvingande konsekvens av själva medlemskapet eftersom EU:s regler om fri rörlighet av varor inte har rimmat med Sveriges syn på alkohol som en folkhälsofråga. Frågan är dock om det enbart är själva medlemskapet som drivit fram förändringarna eller om de lika mycket beror på ändrad inställning och attityd bland svenskarna. Det här kapitlet redogör för de 17 år som förflutit sedan Sverige trädde in i EU. Det beskriver de lagändringar som Sverige gjort i alkoholfrågan och de mekanismer som drivit fram dessa. Det berättar också hur Sverige genom konsekvent påtryckning, forskning och kunskapsspridning lyckats medverka till en attitydförändring inom EU och lyfta alkoholfrågan till att också bli en fråga om folkhälsa. Det är berättelsen om hur ett litet medlemsland, med hjälp av goda argument och stöd från andra länder, kan påverka EU:s politiska utveckling.

  • 10.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Nordic gambling markets and the possibilities for state-level control2006In: Journal of Gambling Issues, ISSN 1494-5185, no 18, p. 9-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gambling has gone through considerable changes during recent decades with new forms of gambling, increased turnover, and increasingly extensive marketing of different modes of gambling. At the same time, the monopolistic structure of state-controlled gambling has been questioned by media and private actors on national and European Union (EU) levels. The focus has increasingly ended up on legal interpretations of the possibilities of and the obstacles for state regulation, which has recently placed Nordic gambling monopolies under scrutiny.

    The purpose of this article is to clarify the legal arrangements for gambling in the Nordic countries and also how the different countries have chosen to react to increased pressure for deregulation of this area. The article describes how gambling is regulated in the five different countries and analyses what parts of the legal framework of the EU are a threat to the existing gambling systems in these countries.

  • 11.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sweden, the EU and the alcohol traveller’s allowances2010In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 3--38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Restrictive alcohol policies have a long history at the national level in Sweden; however, with the accession to the European Union the international component of alcohol policy has become clearer, and the national policies have been eroded. Sweden had to abandon low traveller’s allowances and gradually adopt the considerably higher European levels by January 1, 2004. On the EU level the traveller’s allowances were an issue long before Sweden’s accession, and high allowances were a conscious way of forcing down high taxes as an instrument of harmonization. The purpose of the article is to analyze how the changes and the Swedish government’s actions on the traveller’s allowances issue have been understood. Analyzing this case contributes to understanding the major changes that have occurred in Swedish alcohol policy since the mid-1990s. Different narratives from interviews, official documents, and news articles make it possible to understand alcohol policy developments in Sweden in relation to the EU. The article finds that there are five main narratives which have been used to try to explain the development of the traveller’s allowances question: the Misinterpretation Explanation, the Double Accounts Explanation, the Impotence Explanation, the Humility Explanation, and the Optimism Explanation. The article also shows that the different narratives have developed over time, indicating a learning process among Swedish authorities on the functioning of EU policy processes.

  • 12.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The de-monopolization of pharmaceutical retail in Sweden: Policy, actors and arguments.2012In: A welfare policy patchwork: negotiating the public good in times of transition / [ed] Matilda Hellman, Gun Roos, Julius von Wright, Helsinki: Nordic Centre for Welfare and Social Issues (NVC) , 2012, p. 101-121Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyses the regulation of pharmaceuticals in Sweden, with special emphasis on the demonopolization of retail trade in 2009 and the actors and arguments involved in the process. It shows how differences in ideologies and values affect policy outcomes and create different possibilities to organize the market. Furthermore, the chapter discusses the implications of the regulatory changes and looks at how the changes to the organization of Swedish pharmacies have affected ordinary citizens. It is concluded that the regulation of pharmaceuticals has received much political debate in Sweden, but that the issue has nonetheless been hard to resolve. Over time there has been a shift in argumentation from a non-acceptance of profits and an emphasis on safe pharmaceuticals management in the 1970s to the current profit thinking with a view to increasing efficiency, availability and service standards. The Hanner case acted as a catalyst in a period when neither of the political blocs were interested in putting a reformation of pharmacies on the political agenda. The new system has so far improved availability. Expectations of lower prices and greater customer satisfaction have not been met in the same manner.

  • 13.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The Europeanization of Swedish Alcohol Policy2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this dissertation is to study the Europeanization of Swedish alcohol policy from 1995-2006. It analyses the development of Swedish and European alcohol policy and answers the following research questions: How has alcohol policy developed on the national and the EU level during this period? What are the Swedish alcohol policy initiatives on the EU level? What does the interplay between Swedish and European policy processes look like? Of interest for this dissertation is also how the Swedish view on alcohol policy has been received on EU level.

    The dissertation comprises four related articles and an introductory chapter. In the articles official documents and interviews are analyzed in the context of the literature on Europeanization, using the concepts framing, narrative and new modes of governance. Article I explores the history of negotiations between Sweden and the EU on the traveller’s allowances question. Article II and III analyse how Swedish authorities, first through research and later through formal policy-making during the Swedish Presidency, tried to reframe alcohol on the EU-level. Finally, the fourth article is a comparative analysis of the Nordic retail monopolies, analyzing how the monopolies have developed and reacted to national and international pressures on their activities.

    The dissertation shows that Swedish authorities have influenced the EU level by putting alcohol on the agenda, and offered pressure and economic support to make sure that alcohol as a public health question has become and been kept as a prioritized question. This development is, however, nested inside the changing scope and emphasis of the EU. The emergence of a European alcohol policy as a public health-oriented process has been made possible through a new focus on the EU level, with increased cooperation between member states and a trend toward harmonization of policy and frames when it comes to alcohol.

  • 14.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The Europeanization of Swedish alcohol policy - the case of ECAS2008In: Journal of European Social Policy, ISSN 0958-9287, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 380-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas governments had previously designed early exit policies to unburden labour markets, they have come increasingly to regard them as problematic. We investigate the reasons for this policy reversal, focusing on two key actors: governments and trade unions. Our mixed-methods approach entails two major steps: first, we embed approaches to policy reform in a common framework to show the empirical relevance of the two major actors in most OECD countries. We find that both government ideology and union representativeness matter. In a second step, we investigate reform processes in two countries in more detail. Belgium and the Netherlands have much in common as regards government and interest groups but differ in terms of the reversal of early exit policies. We see that both the configuration of electoral and welfare state institutions have shaped the specific strategic environment of the two actors in both countries.

  • 15.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The Europeanization of Swedish alcohol Policy: framing and New Modes of Governance2009 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since Sweden became a member of the EU, the historically restrictive policies derived at national level must now work on a European level as well. Consequently, there has been a swift development of the alcohol policy area both in Sweden and more broadly in the EU. Drawing on the Europeanization literature, new analyses and insight focus on the intriguing interplay between the nation state and the EU when it comes to alcohol policy change. Previous research has shown that alcohol in the EU primarily has been seen in terms of commodities in the common market. Using Sweden as an example, this book also demonstrates how Swedish authorities have influenced EU policy making by putting alcohol on the agenda as a public health issue. This book describes how the emergence of a European alcohol policy has been made possible through a new focus on the EU level, with increased cooperation between member states and a trend toward harmonization of policy and frames. Thus it is of special interest for those studying political processes, the development of the EU and public health related questions.

     

  • 16.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ökat tryck på nordiska spelmonopol2005In: Socialt perspektiv, ISSN 1102-2973, no 1, p. 85-97Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Hettne, Jörgen
    The Future Swedish Gambling Market: Challenges in Law and Public Policies2018In: Gambling Policies in European Welfare States: Current Challenges and Future Prospects / [ed] Michael Egerer, Virve Marionneau, Janne Nikkinen, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 197-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish gambling regulation has been questioned from an EU law perspective. While no changes have yet taken place, a reform proposal has during 2017 been submitted and the Government has in April 2018 passed a bill to Parliament based on that proposal. The new Swedish Gambling Act shall be based on a licensing system: anyone who wants to act in the Swedish gambling market must have a designated licence. The proposal underlines that the negative consequences of gambling should be limited and that extensive consumer protection calls for curbs on marketing. This chapter will discuss different aspects of gambling regulation in Sweden, especially in the light of EU law. Particular attention will be paid to the legal scope for reform, differences in taxation including the position held by public interest non-profit organisations, marketing and consumer protection.

  • 18.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Impacts of Tourism on Drinking and Alcohol Policy in Low-And Middle-Income Countries: A Selective Thematic Review2014In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 145-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article considers impacts of the drinking patterns of tourists from high-consumption, high-income societies on low- and middle-income societies, thematically reviewing a rather sparse literature. Drinking — indeed, drinking more than at home — fits well into the context of tourism. Heavy drinking by tourists has a substantial impact on many elements in the host society, increasing consumption levels particularly among young people working within the tourism sector. Tourist industry interests have often successfully argued for policies that result in a wider general availability of alcohol in the society, and provision for tourists has often served as an entry point in the society for the global alcohol industry. National and international consideration of policies to reduce alcohol problems should take into consideration the potential adverse influences on national alcohol policies arising from tourism.

  • 19.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sohlberg, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Swedish Tobacco policy: from rational choice to ‘harm to others’2012In: A welfare policy patchwork: negotiating the public good in times of transition / [ed] Matilda Hellman, Gun Roos, Julius von Wright, Helsinki: Nordic Centre for Welfare and Social Issues (NVC) , 2012, p. 65-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter analyses the development of Swedish tobacco policy and tobacco regulation since the early 1990s. In addition, it looks at how this policy has been influenced by the World Health Organization, the European Union, the Nordic countries and various others stakeholders, and examines the effect of policy changes on smoking cessation in the Swedish population. The chapter is based on both primary and secondary sources such as policy documents, previous research and survey data. It is concluded that both the political and research focus has shifted from the provision of information to rational individuals to highlighting the effects of smoking to others. Swedish tobacco regulation has been influenced by policies in other Nordic countries, but it is largely a product of WHO and EU recommendations and directives. In an international perspective, Swedish tobacco policy seems to have been rather more reactive than proactive. It is also shown that policy decisions on pricing and availability, for instance, have a somewhat greater impact on smoking cessation than information. However, women tend to be more responsive than men to information campaigns and health warnings.

  • 20.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Tammi, Tuukka
    Gambling problems as a political framing: Safeguarding the monopolies in Finland and Sweden2011In: Journal of Gambling Issues, ISSN 1494-5185, no 26, p. 110-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ManyEUmember states are currently rethinking their gambling laws and policies to adapt toEuropean lawand to take into account increased technological possibilities for the gamblingindustry and increased competition on national gambling markets. Some of the countrieshave responded to the newsituation by giving up or remarkablyweakening theirmonopolies,but other countries have, on the contrary, reformed their monopoly systems to strengthenthem to meet the new challenges. This article analyses gambling policy reforms in Finlandand Sweden, where the liberalisation trend has been contested to safeguard the monopolysystems. The main means have been an increased focus on gambling-related problems andemphasis on the responsible nature and particular capability of monopoly-based systemsto tackle these problems. This has made it possible not only to keep the monopoly systemintact but also to expand its field of activities to the Internet as a responsible measure.

  • 21.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ólafsdóttir, Hildigunnur
    How to sell alcohol?: Nordic alcohol monopolies in a changing epoch2008In: Nordisk alkohol- och narkotikatidskrift, ISSN 1455-0725, Vol. 25, p. 129-153Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ólafsdóttir, Hildigunnur
    Hur sälja alkohol?: Nordiska alkoholmonopol i en tid av förändring2007In: Nordisk alkohol- och narkotikatidskift, Vol. 24, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Forsström, David
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Jenny, Cisneros Örnberg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Responsible gambling in practice: A case study of views and practices of Swedish oriented gambling companies2019In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 91-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish gambling market faces a major change in legislation that will allow foreign-based companies to apply for a gambling licence in Sweden. A key element in the new legislation are consumer protection measures. The Swedish gambling market is currently divided between licensed companies and non-Swedish-based companies providing online gambling services without a licence in Sweden. How these companies view their responsibility for preventing gambling-related harm and how prepared they are for the new regulations are important questions regarding the new Swedish gambling market. Aims: To compare and analyse the views and practices on problem gambling and responsible gambling (RG) measures among licensed and unlicensed gambling companies on the Swedish market. Design/Methods/Data: Eleven semi-structured interviews were carried out with responsible gambling managers who are members of either of the two Swedish industry associations. Content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. Results: Non-licensed companies have implemented behaviour tracking and monitoring of gamblers in a more extensive way than licensed companies. Both the licensed and the unlicensed companies conceptualise problem gambling in a similar manner and rely on informed choice in preventing gamblers from developing problems, seemingly arguing that offering responsible gambling measures on their website is enough. Conclusions: There are several similarities in how the two types of companies define problem gambling and responsible gambling. Both groups lack a critical perspective when discussing RG. There is a need for companies not only to provide RG measures, but to take an active role in preventing harm among gamblers. Future research should focus on exploring how companies work with RG after the legislative change.

  • 24.
    Hellman, Matilda
    et al.
    University of Helsinki.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Livingstone, Charles
    Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Gambling policy studies: a field that is growing in size and complexity2017In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1606-6359, E-ISSN 1476-7392, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 433-435Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25. Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Lindeman, Mikaela
    Österberg, Esa
    Ahtola, Raija
    Moskalewicz, Jacek
    Welbel, Marta
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Report of previously studied European changes in the economic and physical availability of alcohol on alcohol-related harm2011Report (Other academic)
  • 26. Motka, Franziska
    et al.
    Grüne, Bettina
    Sleczka, Pawel
    Braun, Barbara
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany; ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
    Who uses self-exclusion to regulate problem gambling? A systematic literature review2018In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, ISSN 2062-5871, E-ISSN 2063-5303, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 903-916Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Self-exclusion programs offer an intervention for individuals with problem gambling behavior. However, these programs are insufficiently used. This review describes sociodemographic features and gambling behavior of self-excluders as well as goals and motives for initiating self-exclusion from terrestrial and online gambling. In addition, use of further professional help and barriers to self-exclusion are examined.

    METHODS: Based on systematic literature search and quality assessment, n = 16 original studies (13 quantitative, 2 qualitative, and 1 mixed method) published between 1997 and 2017 in English or German language were analyzed. Results are presented for online and terrestrial gambling separately.

    RESULTS: Online self-excluders were on average 10 years younger than terrestrial self-excluders. Self-exclusion was mainly motivated by financial problems, followed by feelings of losing control and problems with significant others. Financial problems and significant others were less important for online than for terrestrial gamblers. Main barriers for self-exclusion were complicated enrollment processes, lack of complete exclusion from all venues, little support from venue staff, and lack of adequate information on self-exclusion programs. Both self-excluders from terrestrial and online gambling had negative attitudes toward the need of professional addiction care.

    CONCLUSION: To exploit the full potential of self-exclusion as a measure of gambler protection, its acceptance and its utilization need to be increased by target-group-specific information addressing financial issues and the role of significant others, simplifying the administrative processes, facilitating self-exclusion at an early stage of the gambling career, offering self-determined exclusion durations, and promoting additional use of professional addiction care.

  • 27.
    Room, Robin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The governance of addictions at the international level2014In: Reframing addictions: policies, processes and pressures / [ed] Peter Anderson, Gerard Bühringer & Johan Colom, Barcelona: ALICE RAP project , 2014, 1, p. 46-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter considers the governance of addictions in an international perspective, focusing on structures and actions at a global level and within the European Union (EU) in the fields of drugs, pharmaceuticals, alcohol, tobacco and gambling. Both at a global level and within the EU, there is great disparity between different addictive substances and behaviours in the extent of and priorities in international governance of markets and their customers. Nonmedical use of psychoactive substances under international drug control treaties is subject to a strict prohibitory regime, and at the EU level implementing that regime has been a political project of unification.  In contrast, alcohol and gambling are subject to no public health-oriented international regulation, and trade treaties and agreements have been used as instruments to weaken national and local control regimes.  Tobacco and psychopharmaceuticals (along with other medications under prescription regimes), are at intermediate positions. At the EU level, court decisions on trade and national control issues have paid substantial attention to considerations of public health and interest. But at the global level, international trade and investment law has fairly systematically operated to undercut control for public health or in the public interest in all areas other than the drug prohibition treaties.  Particularly globally, there has been a tendency toward a Manichean system where an addictive commodity either is forbidden entirely or is subject to free-market rules with diminishing restrictions on the market and promotion.    

  • 28. Sulkunen, Pekka
    et al.
    Babor, Thomas F.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Egerer, Michael
    Hellman, Matilda
    Livingstone, Charles
    Marionneau, Virve
    Nikkinen, Janne
    Orford, Jim
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Rossow, Ingeborg
    Setting Limits: Gambling, Science and Public Policy2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a focus on evidence from social, economic, epidemiological, and policy research, the scientific basis of the evidence is reviewed in a way that informs policymakers from a solid groundwork of data.

    An international focus provides the reader with a global view of the emerging epidemic of gambling problems.

1 - 28 of 28
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