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  • 1. Clifford, Marian
    et al.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    English: language of hope or broken dreams?1992In: Adult basic education in South Africa: literacy, English as a second language, and numeracy / [ed] Barbara Hutton, Cape Town: Oxford University Press, 1992, 152-218 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter provides a critical overview of the major debates, theories and teaching approaches in second language education for adults with little or no formal education. The first two sections examine the contested role of English as a language of access in South Africa and the debates surrounding the language of instruction for initial literacy. They draw on Nicaraguan and Mozambican literacy campaigns to illuminate some of the consequences of decisions on language of instruction for large-scale campaigns. The third section critically examines current approaches to teaching English as a second language to adults in South Africa in terms of the understandings of language and language learning that underpin them. The fourth and final section attempts to lay the groundwork for the second or additional language component of a future adult education policy. Framed by a vision of participatory democracy, it proposes a model which integrates theoretical principles from Freirean-inspired popular education, adult education and second language learning.

  • 2.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Changing conceptions of literacies, language and development: Implications for the provision of adult basic education in South Africa2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to contribute to the growing body of knowledge on the circumstances under which adult education, in particular adult basic education, can support and occasionally initiate participatory development, social action and the realisation of citizenship rights. It traces developments in adult basic education in South Africa, and more specifically literacy and language learning, over the years 1981 to 2001, with reference to specific multilingual contexts in the Northern and Western Cape.

    The thesis is based on four individual studies, documenting an arc from grassroots work to national policy development and back. Study I, written in the early 1990s, critically examines approaches to teaching English to adults in South Africa at the time and proposes a participatory curriculum model for the additional language component of a future adult education policy. Study II is an account of attempts to implement this model and explores the implications of going to scale with such an approach.  Studies III and IV draw on a qualitative study of an educator development programme after the transition to democracy. Study III uses Bourdieu's theory of practice and the concept of reflexivity to illuminate some of  the connections between local discursive practices, self-formation, and broader relations of power. Study IV uses Iedema's (1999) concept of resemiotisation to trace the ways in which individuals re-shaped available representational resources to mobilise collective agency in community-based workshops. The summary provides a framework for these studies by locating and critiquing each within shifts in the political economy of South Africa. It reflects on a history of research and practice, raising questions to do with voice, justice, power, agency, and desire. Overall, this thesis argues for a reconceptualisation of ABET that is more strongly aligned with development goals and promotes engagement with new forms of state/society/economy relations.

     

     

  • 3.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Making and shaping participatory spaces: Resemiotisation and citizenship agencyManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In South Africa, democratic consolidation involves not only building a new state but also new interfaces between state and society. In order to strengthen the agency of citizens at these interfaces, recent approaches to development stress the notion of ‘participatory citizenship’ which recasts citizenship as practised rather than given. The purpose of this paper is to explore the links between such practices of participatory citizenship and possibilities for literacy and language education in state adult learning centres. It draws on an impact study of a capacity building programme for educators of adults in the Northern Cape Province and uses interviews and document analysis to explore the ways in which meaning-making unfolded in new participatory spaces. It argues that such processes can be seen as  a form of ‘linguistic citizenship’ in which individuals and groups re-shaped the multilingual representational resources available to them to validate the authority of subaltern actors and mobilise collective agency. It uses the concept of resemiotisation (Iedema 1999) to investigate how the choice of different semiotic complexes enabled or constrained participation and to offer a set of principles for reconceptualising the provision of adult basic education.

     

  • 4.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Making and shaping participatory spaces: resemiotization and citizenship agency in South Africa2011In: International Multilingual Research Journal, ISSN 1931-3152, E-ISSN 1931-3160, Vol. 5, no 2, 87-102 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In South Africa, democratic consolidation involves not only building a new state but also new interfaces between state and society.  To strengthen the agency of citizens at these interfaces, recent approaches to development stress the notion of “participatory citizenship”.  The purpose of this paper is to explore the links, rarely achieved in practice, between such practices of participatory citizenship and possibilities for literacy and language education.  The paper draws on a study of a capacity building programme for educators of adults in the Northern Cape Province.  It uses the concept of resemiotisation to explore the ways in which participants re-shaped the multilingual representational resources available to them to legitimise the authority of subaltern actors and mobilise collective agency.  Finally it argues that such semiotic practices can be seen as a form of “linguistic citizenship” which could promote locally rooted and participatory democracy under a radically reoriented Adult Basic Education system.

  • 5.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Participatory education in South Africa: contradic­tions and challenges.1993In: TESOL quarterly (Print), ISSN 0039-8322, Vol. 27, no 3, 431-447 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and critiques a participatory ESL curriculum development project within a South African nongovernmental organisation. It locates this project within the political and economic context as South Africa moves from apartheid towards democracy. The contradictions inherent in developing participatory curricula and materials for large-scale use are described, and the choices made to reconcile them discussed. The paper ends with a discussion of the challenges facing adult basic education (ABE) in the future and suggests some directions for development.

  • 6.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Review of Ryuko Kubota and Angel M. Y. Lin (eds): Race, Culture, and Identities in Second Language Education: Exploring Critically Engaged Practice.2011In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 32, no 2, 244-247 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Speaking of, for, and with others: Some methodological considerations2016In: Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics Plus, ISSN 1726-541X, Vol. 49, 331-341 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a brief reflection on two decades of work in NGOs and with trade unions from 1982 to 2001. For most of the time covered by this research note, I worked for a non-governmental organisation (NGO), one of several small, politically committed literacy organisations that sprang up in the aftermath of Soweto 1976 as part of a broader response to increasingly repressive state policies.

  • 8.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Transforming identities and enacting agency: the discourses of participatory development in training South African adult educators.2008In: Journal of Education, ISSN 0259-479X, Vol. 45, 95-128 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the ways in which adult education can contribute to increased agency in development and under what conditions. It draws on a study of an educator training programme in the Northern Cape at a time of rapid social change and theorises the uneven realisation of reflexive agency in participants' practices. The analysis of interview data draws on Bourdieu's concepts of field, capital, habitus, legitimate language and reflexivity to probe the connections between local discursive practices and broader systemic relationships of power. The findings suggest that a key contribution of the programme was a set of discourses that enabled participants to engage with the processes engendered by new forms of governance and state/society/economy relations. However, the ability to bring about new identities and increased reflexive agency depended on the interaction of five framing factors. In this way, reflexivity emerges as contextual, embedded within differing sets of power relations, and not necessarily transformative.

     

  • 9.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Bello-Nonjengele, Basirat
    Game changers? Multilingual learners in a Cape Town primary school2016In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 37, no 4, 451-473 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages with Bourdieu’s notion of field as a ‘space of play’ to explore what happens to the educational field and the linguistic regimes operating within it in a site in which new discourses and practices of identity, language, ‘race’, and ethnicity become entangled with local economies of meaning. The context is a primary school in a low-income neighbourhood in Cape Town, South Africa. We draw on multilingual classroom and playground data from observations, interviews, and audio-recorded peer interactions among Grade 6 learners to illuminate the strategic mobilization of linguistic repertoires in encounters across difference: as identity-building resources and as means of shaping new interaction orders, restructuring hierarchies of value, subverting indexicalities, and sometimes resignifying racial categories. We further draw attention to a set of circumstances in which local actors have the potential to change, not only the rules of the game, but the game itself.

  • 10.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, KennethStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Entangled discourses: South-North orders of visibility2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book uniquely explores the shifting structures of power and unexpected points of intersection – entanglements – at the nexus of North and South as a lens through which to examine the impact of global and local circuits of people, practices and ideas on linguistic, cultural and knowledge systems. The volume considers the entanglement of North and South on multiple levels in the contemporary and continuing effects of capitalism, colonialism, and imperialism, in the form of silenced or marginalized populations, such as refugees, immigrants, and other minoritised groups, and in the different orders of visibility that make some types of practices and knowledge more legitimate and therefore more visible. It uses a range of methodological and analytical frames to shed light on less visible histories, practices, identities, repertoires, and literacies, and offer new understandings for research and for language, health care, education, and other policies and practices.

  • 11.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Introduction: Entanglement and Order of Visibility2017In: Entangled discourses: South-North Orders of Visibility / [ed] Caroline Kerfoot, Kenneth Hyltenstam, New York: Routledge, 2017, 1-15 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Simon-Vandenbergen, Anne-Marie
    Language in epistemic access: mobilising multilingualism and literacy development2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book focuses on how to address persistent linguistically structured inequalities in education, primarily in relation to South African schools, but also in conversation with Australian work and with resonances for other multilingual contexts around the world. The book as a whole lays bare the tension between the commitment to multilingualism enshrined in the South African Constitution and language-in-education policy, and the realities of the dominance of English and the virtual absence of indigenous African languages in current educational practices. It suggests that dynamic plurilingual pedagogies can be allied with the explicit scaffolding of genre-based pedagogies to help redress asymmetries in epistemic access and to re-imagine policies, pedagogies, and practices more in tune with the realities of multilingual classrooms. The contributions to this book offer complementary insights on routes to improving access to school knowledge, especially for learners whose home language or language variety is different to that of teaching and learning at school. All subscribe to similar ideologies which include the view that multilingualism should be seen as a resource rather than a 'problem' in education. Commentaries on these chapters highlight evidence-based high-impact educational responses, and suggest that translanguaging and genre may well offer opportunities for students to expand their linguistic repertoires and to bridge epistemological differences between community and school. This book was originally published as a special issue of Language and Education.

  • 13.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Simon-Vandenbergen, Anne-Marie
    Language in epistemic access: mobilising multilingualism and literacy development for more equitable education in South Africa2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Simon-Vandenbergen, Anne-Marie
    Language in epistemic access: mobilising multilingualism and literacy development for more equitable education in South Africa2015In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 29, no 3, 177-185 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is the guest editors’ introduction to the special issue ‘Language in Epistemic Access: Mobilising Multilingualism and Literacy Development for More Equitable Education in South Africa’. The issue offers complementary perspectives on improving epistemic access for all learners but especially those whose home language does not match the language of learning. Plüddemann examines the complex configurations of ideological and structural factors in South African language policy processes and the diverse positions taken up by teachers in response. Makalela argues that a methodology that encourages translanguaging can overcome historical separations between groups and promote transformative pedagogies. Probyn points to the importance of principled ‘pedagogical translanguaging’ in the mediation of secondary school science knowledge. Kerfoot and Van Heerden illustrate the substantial benefits of Systemic Functional Linguistic genre-based pedagogies for second or additional language writing in the middle years. White, Mammone and Caldwell in Australia offer evidence that similar benefits were maintained over six years for learners who faced both socio-economic and linguistic disadvantage in schools. Finally, Cummins and Heugh offer expansive perspectives on the issue. The editors argue that dynamic plurilingual pedagogies can be allied with the explicit scaffolding of genre-based pedagogies to help redress asymmetries in epistemic access.

  • 15.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Tatah, Gwendoline
    Constructing invisibility: An immigrant learner in South Africa2016In: Working Papers in Urban Languages and Literacies, Vol. 192, 25 p.1-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to contribute to an epistemology of the global South (Santos 2012) by pointing to invisibilized processes of social production as a necessary starting point for greater ethical engagement and mutual intelligibility. It builds on research on the co-construction of micro-interactional identities and macro-social categories to analyse the gradual invisibilisation of the linguistic and epistemic resources of a 13-year-old Cameroonian immigrant in diasporic and educational sites in Cape Town, South Africa. Invisibilisation is understood as an interdiscursive process achieved through a set of indexical phenomena including the operation of dual indexicality (Kulick 2003), tied into circulating discourses of belonging and constrained by institutional frameworks. Drawing on a four year linguistic ethnography, the chapter draws attention to the ways in which discursive processes construct orders of visibility, both momentary and of longer duration, which in turn rework local orders of indexicality and associated hierarchies of ‘race’, language, and ethnicity.

  • 16.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Tatah, Gwendoline
    Constructing invisibility: The discursive erasure of a black immigrant learner in South Africa2017In: Entangled Discourses: South-North Orders of Visibility / [ed] Caroline Kerfoot, Kenneth Hyltenstam, New York: Routledge, 2017, 37-58 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Van Heerden, Michelle
    University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Testing the Waters: Exploring the Teaching of Genres in a Cape Flats Primary School in South Africa2015In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 29, no 3, 235-255 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty years after democracy, the legacy of apartheid and hitherto unmet challenges of resourcing and teacher development are reflected in a severely inequitable and underperforming education system. This paper focuses on second language writing in the middle years of schooling when 80% of learners face a double challenge: to move from ‘common sense’ discourses to the more abstract, specialised discourses of school subjects and, simultaneously, to a new language of learning, in this case English. It describes an intervention using a Systemic Functional Linguistic (SFL) genre-based pedagogy involving 72 learners and two teachers in a low socio-economic neighbourhood of Cape Town. Using an SFL analytical framework, we analyse learners’ development in the Information Report genre. All learners in the intervention group made substantial gains in control of staging, lexis, and key linguistic features. We argue that the scaffolding provided by SFL genre-based pedagogies together with their explicit focus on textual and linguistic features offer a means of significantly enhancing epistemic access to the specialised language of school subjects, particularly for additional language learners. Findings have implications for language-in-education policy, teacher education, curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment in multilingual classrooms.

  • 18.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Winberg, Chris
    Learning about action research1997Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intended for tertiary ABET students who are learning in English as a second language, this book gives detailed and practical advice on how to proceed collaboratively through the various stages of the action research cycle.

  • 19.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Towards rethinking multilingualism and language policy for academic literacies2013In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 24, no 4, 396-405 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The language policy of the University of the Western Cape (2003) reflects the temperedtraces of historically and politically charged negotiations. We argue that a reinterpreta-tion of ‘policy failure’ as responsive engagement with complex new forms of linguisticand social diversity can lead to a critical rethinking of the nature of multilingualism andlanguage policy in a South African tertiary education sector in transformation. We submitthat university language policies need to consider (a) how the complex linguistic and non-linguistic repertoires of students can be mobilised for transformative discipline-specificcurricula and pedagogies, and (b) the concept of multilingualism both as a resource anda transformative epistemology and methodology of diversity. We suggest a policy devel-opment process that moves from micro-interaction to macro-structure, tracing processesof resemiotisation, interrogating legitimised representational conventions, and reshapinginstitutional practices and perceptions. We discuss the implications for register formationand for broader epistemological access and ownership.

1 - 19 of 19
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