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  • 1.
    Coll, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Changes in sediment bacterial community composition throughout an OECD 308 test with ten micropollutantsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Coll, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Lindim, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Sobek, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Sohn, Michael D.
    MacLeod, Matthew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Prospects for finding Junge variability-lifetime relationships for micropollutants in the Danube river2019In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1489-1497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persistence of chemical pollutants is difficult to measure in the field. Junge variability-lifetime relationships, correlating the relative standard deviation of measured concentrations with residence time, have been used to estimate persistence of air pollutants. Junge relationships for micropollutants in rivers could provide evidence that half-lives of compounds estimated from laboratory and field data are representative of half-lives in a specific system, location and time. Here, we explore the hypothesis that Junge relationships could exist for micropollutants in the Danube river using: (1) concentrations of six hypothetical chemicals modeled using the STREAM-EU fate and transport model, and (2) concentrations of nine micropollutants measured in the third Joint Danube Survey (JDS3) combined with biodegradation half-lives reported in the literature. Using STREAM-EU, we found that spatial and temporal variability in modeled concentrations was inversely correlated with half-life for the four micropollutants with half-lives <= 90 days. For these four modeled micropollutants, we found Junge relationships with slopes significantly different from zero in the temporal variability of concentrations at 88% of the 67 JDS3 measurement sites, and in the spatial variability of concentrations on 36% out of 365 modeled days. A Junge relationship significant at the 95% confidence level was not found in the spatial variability of nine micropollutants measured in the JDS3, nor in STREAM-EU-modeled concentrations extracted for the dates and locations of the JDS3. Nevertheless, our model scenarios suggest that Junge relationships might be found in future measurements of spatial and temporal variability of micropollutants, especially in temporal variability of pollutants measured downstream in the Danube river.

  • 3.
    Coll, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Raven, Bier
    Li, Zhe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Sobek, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Association between aquatic micropollutant degradation and river sediment bacterial communitiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Coll Mora, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science.
    How to estimate environmental persistence: Understanding persistence of organic micropollutants in rivers from a multidisciplinary perspective2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic micropollutants such as food additives, pharmaceuticals and personal care products are found in rivers worldwide. Persistence is a key criteria in chemical risk assessment as micropollutants that are persistent pose an exposure hazard to humans and the environment. As biodegradation is the most relevant removal process for many micropollutants in rivers, persistence assessment relies on the estimation of the biodegradation half-life.  This thesis presents new approaches to understand the biodegradation of organic pollutants in rivers.

    The application of Junge relationships (previously established for atmospheric pollutants), to river systems, was investigated in paper I to assess if biodegradation half-lives in the Danube river are correlated with variability in measured concentrations. Model scenarios show Junge relationships could potentially be found in measurements performed near the mouth of the river, but Junge relationships were not found in currently available monitoring data. In paper II an experimental design and response surface model were developed to study the effect of hyporheic exchange (induced by flowing water) and bacterial diversity in sediment on dissipation half-lives of two micropollutants in flumes. Faster dissipation was observed in flumes with high bacterial diversity and higher hyporheic exchange, and thus both variables are relevant to study dissipation processes in rivers. The influence of biological factors beyond bacteria diversity is explored in papers III and IV, by characterizing the bacteria community composition of sediment in OECD 308 bottle incubations (a standard test that is often recommended in risk assessment guidelines). In paper III, higher variation in half-lives (e.g. relative standard deviations > 50%) were found for micropollutants with longer half-lives (e.g. from 40 to more than 120 days). Higher variation in half-lives also corresponded to differences in bacteria community composition and specifically to increased or decreased abundance of certain bacteria genera. Although the exact bacteria genera involved in the biodegradation of the micropollutants cannot be determined in papers II or III, our results suggest bacteria community composition and diversity should be considered in the interpretation of biodegradation half-lives since they are related to variability in biodegradation and to understand extrapolation from laboratory to the field. Finally in paper IV, it is investigated if the bacteria communities are affected by the OECD 308 test conditions. Changes in the bacteria communities in the sediment between the initial river community, the beginning and the end of the incubation, at high and a low concentrations are reported. Overall, 8% of bacteria genera increased or decreased in relative abundance in all comparisons, and it is unclear if these small changes in bacteria communities could have had an effect on the observed half-lives in paper III.

    This thesis contributes to the understanding of physical and biological factors influencing biodegradation and potential implications for risk assessment of organic micropollutants in rivers.

  • 5. Jaeger, Anna
    et al.
    Coll, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Posselt, Malte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Mechelke, Jonas
    Rutere, Cyrus
    Betterle, Andrea
    Raza, Muhammad
    Mehrtens, Anne
    Meinikmann, Karin
    Portmann, Andrea
    Singh, Tanu
    Blaen, Phillip J.
    Krause, Stefan
    Horn, Marcus A.
    Hollender, Juliane
    Benskin, Jonathan P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Sobek, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Lewandowski, Joerg
    Using recirculating flumes and a response surface model to investigate the role of hyporheic exchange and bacterial diversity on micropollutant half-lives2019In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 2093-2108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancing the understanding of the fate of wastewater-derived organic micropollutants in rivers is crucial to improve risk assessment, regulatory decision making and river management. Hyporheic exchange and sediment bacterial diversity are two factors gaining increasing importance as drivers for micropollutant degradation, but are complex to study in field experiments and usually ignored in laboratory tests aimed to estimate environmental half-lives. Flume mesocosms are useful to investigate micropollutant degradation processes, bridging the gap between the field and batch experiments. However, few studies have used flumes in this context. We present a novel experimental setup using 20 recirculating flumes and a response surface model to study the influence of hyporheic exchange and sediment bacterial diversity on half-lives of the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) and the artificial sweetener acesulfame (ACS). The effect of bedform-induced hyporheic exchange was tested by three treatment levels differing in number of bedforms (0, 3 and 6). Three levels of sediment bacterial diversity were obtained by diluting sediment from the River Erpe in Berlin, Germany, with sand (1 : 10, 1 : 1000 and 1 : 100 000). Our results show that ACS half-lives were significantly influenced by sediment dilution and number of bedforms. Half-lives of CBZ were higher than ACS, and were significantly affected only by the sediment dilution variable, and thus by bacterial diversity. Our results show that (1) the flume-setup is a useful tool to study the fate of micropollutants in rivers, and that (2) higher hyporheic exchange and bacterial diversity in the sediment can increase the degradation of micropollutants in rivers.

  • 6. Jaeger, Anna
    et al.
    Posselt, Malte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Betterle, Andrea
    Schaper, Jonas
    Mechelke, Jonas
    Coll, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Lewandowski, Joerg
    Spatial and Temporal Variability in Attenuation of Polar Organic Micropollutants in an Urban Lowland Stream2019In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 2383-2395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contamination of rivers by trace organic compounds (TrOCs) poses a risk for aquatic ecosystems and drinking water quality. Spatially- and temporally varying environmental conditions are expected to play a major role in controlling in-stream attenuation of TrOCs. This variability is rarely captured by in situ studies of TrOC attenuation. Instead, snap-shots or time-weighted average conditions and corresponding attenuation rates are reported. The present work sought to investigate this variability and factors controlling it by analysis of 24 TrOCs over a 4.7 km reach of the River Erpe (Berlin, Germany). The factors investigated included sunlight and water temperature as well as the presence of macrophytes. Attenuation rate constants in 48 consecutive hourly water parcels were tracked along two contiguous river sections of different characteristics. Section 1 was less shaded and more densely covered with submerged macrophytes compared to section 2. The sampling campaign was repeated after macrophyte removal from section 1. The findings show, that section 1 generally provided more favorable conditions for both photo- and biodegradation. Macrophyte removal enhanced photolysis of some compounds (e.g., hydrochlorothiazide and diclofenac) while reducing the biodegradation of metoprolol. The transformation products metoprolol acid and valsartan acid were formed along the reach under all conditions.

  • 7. Lewandowski, Jörg
    et al.
    Arnon, Shai
    Banks, Eddie
    Batelaan, Okke
    Betterle, Andrea
    Broecker, Tabea
    Coll, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Drummond, Jennifer D.
    Garcia, Jaime Gaona
    Galloway, Jason
    Gomez-Velez, Jesus
    Grabowski, Robert C.
    Herzog, Skuyler P.
    Hinkelmann, Reinhard
    Höhne, Anja
    Hollender, Juliane
    Horn, Marcus A.
    Jaeger, Anna
    Krause, Stefan
    Löchner Prats, Adrian
    Magliozzi, Chiara
    Meinikmann, Karin
    Mojarrad, Brian Babak
    Mueller, Birgit Maria
    Peralta-Maraver, Ignacio
    Popp, Andrea L.
    Posselt, Malte
    Putschew, Anke
    Radke, Michael
    Raza, Muhammad
    Riml, Joakim
    Robertson, Anne
    Rutere, Cyrus
    Schaper, Jonas L.
    Schirmer, Mario
    Schulz, Hanna
    Shanafield, Margaret
    Singh, Tanu
    Ward, Adam S.
    Wolke, Philipp
    Wörman, Anders
    Wu, Liwen
    Is the Hyporheic Zone Relevant beyond the Scientific Community?2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 2230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rivers are important ecosystems under continuous anthropogenic stresses. The hyporheic zone is a ubiquitous, reactive interface between the main channel and its surrounding sediments along the river network. We elaborate on the main physical, biological, and biogeochemical drivers and processes within the hyporheic zone that have been studied by multiple scientific disciplines for almost half a century. These previous efforts have shown that the hyporheic zone is a modulator for most metabolic stream processes and serves as a refuge and habitat for a diverse range of aquatic organisms. It also exerts a major control on river water quality by increasing the contact time with reactive environments, which in turn results in retention and transformation of nutrients, trace organic compounds, fine suspended particles, and microplastics, among others. The paper showcases the critical importance of hyporheic zones, both from a scientific and an applied perspective, and their role in ecosystem services to answer the question of the manuscript title. It identifies major research gaps in our understanding of hyporheic processes. In conclusion, we highlight the potential of hyporheic restoration to efficiently manage and reactivate ecosystem functions and services in river corridors.

1 - 7 of 7
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