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  • 1.
    Stenberg, Sten-Åke
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Österman, Reidar
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Arvidsson, E.
    von Otter, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Janson, C-E
    Stockholm Birth Cohort Study 1953-2003: A new tool for life-courses studies2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To create a new tool for life-course studies of health outcomes as well as social outcomes. Methods: Two anonymous data sets, one a local birth cohort and the other a nationwide registry, covering information from early and middle life, respectively, were matched using a "key for probability matching" based on a large number of variables, common to both data sets. The first data set provides social and health information from birth, childhood, and adolescence on boys and girls, born in Stockholm in 1953. The second data set provides information on income, work, and education as well as any inpatient visits and any mortality from mid-life for the entire Swedish population. Results: For 96% of the original cohort it was possible to add data from mid-life. Thus, a new database has been created, referred to as the Stockholm Birth Cohort Study, which provides rich and unique life-course data from birth to age 50 for 14,294 individuals: 7,305 men and 6,989 women. Comparison of matched and unmatched cases in the original cohort suggests that those individuals that could not be matched had slightly more favourable social and intellectual circumstances and had often moved away from Sweden in the 1980s. Conclusion: The new database provides excellent opportunities for life-course studies on health and social outcomes. It allows for studies that have not previously been possible in Sweden or elsewhere. Further, it provides an opportunity for collaborative work with similar databases in Copenhagen and Aberdeen.

  • 2.
    von Otter, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Educational and Occupational Careers in a Swedish Cohort2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis includes four empirical studies investigating factors related to educational and occupational careers in a Swedish cohort born in 1953. Data from the longitudinal “Stockholm Birth Cohort study” (SBC) are used. In Studies I & II I investigate educational careers among children whose parents were interviewed as part of the SBC study. In the last two studies I focus on children’s gender-atypical occupational preferences, as an outcome (Study III) and as a factor for adult occupational attainment among women (Study IV).

    Social capital, human capital and parent-child relation quality: interacting for children’s educational achievement? This study investigates the utility of social capital for children’s achievement, and if this utility interacts with human capital of the family and the quality of the parent-child relationship. Results show that social capital is directly related to children’s school grades and its utility for achievement does not depend on parents’ human capital. The utility of social capital is enhanced when combined with a very good parent-child relation.

    Family resources and mid-life level of education: a longitudinal study of the mediating influence of childhood parental involvement. This study focuses on the association between parents’ socio-economic resources and children’s mid-life level of attained education. Results show that this association is mediated by parental involvement in children’s schooling. However, the effect varies across types of parental involvement. Only parents’ educational aspirations for their children have direct mediating effects on the association between parents’ socio-economic resources and children’s mid-life level of attained education.

    Gender-atypical occupational preferences in childhood – findings from a Swedish cohort. This study investigates the association between parents’ socio-economic status and childhood gender-atypical occupational preferences. Results show that childhood occupational status preferences mediate the association between family socio-economic status and childhood gender-atypical occupational preferences, especially among girls.

    High-status employment among women – a longitudinal study of the role of childhood occupational preferences. This study investigates the association between childhood gender-atypical occupational preferences and occupational attainment in adulthood among girls in the SBC cohort. Results show that childhood gender-atypical occupational preferences are positively associated with attainment of high status occupations in adulthood

  • 3.
    von Otter, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family resources and mid-life level of education: a longitudinal study of the mediating influence of childhood parental involvement2014In: British Educational Research Journal, ISSN 0141-1926, E-ISSN 1469-3518, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 555-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on the concept of parental involvement, popular among educators and policy-makers, in investigating differences in level of attained education by family background. The question is if parental involvement in children's schooling at age 14 acts as a mediator between family resources and mid-life level of attained education. Using structural equation modeling we analyze longitudinal survey and register data of a Swedish metropolitan cohort born in 1953 (n=3300). Several of the commonly used indicators of involvement are investigated, distinguishing between parents' involvement beliefs, such as educational aspirations and agreement with school curriculum, and involvement practices, such as reading children's schoolbooks and helping with homework. We find that parents' educational aspirations are an important mediator between family resources and attained level of education, while other involvement forms are related to academic performance only. We also find that parental involvement is greater in families with more resources, which leads us to warn against developments turning more responsibility for children's schooling over to parents. Unless sensitive to the diverse family contexts, this might increase the importance of family resources for children's educational outcomes.

  • 4.
    von Otter, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Gender-atypical occupational preferences in childhood - findings from a Swedish cohortManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    von Otter, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    High-status employment among women - a longitudinal study of the role of childhood occupational preferencesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    von Otter, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Kultur – en del av ett hälsosamt liv?2008Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    von Otter, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stenberg, Sten-Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social capital, human capital and parent-child relation quality: interacting for children's educational achievement2015In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 996-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyse the utility of social capital for children's achievement, and if this utility interacts with family human capital and the quality of the parent-child relationship. Our focus is on parental activities directly related to children's school work. Our data stem from a Swedish cohort born in 1953 and consist of both survey and register data. We find that parents with more human capital tended to offer their children more social capital. OLS regressions show that, when present, social capital was directly related to children's grades and its utility for achievement did not depend on parents' human capital. The utility of social capital was enhanced when combined with a very good parent-child relation.

1 - 7 of 7
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