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  • 1.
    Asgard, Rikard
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharmaceut Biosci., Uppsala, Sweden.
    Haghdoost, Siamak
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Golkar, Siv Osterman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hellman, Bjorn
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Pharmaceut Biosci., Uppsala, Sweden.
    Czene, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Evidence for different mechanisms of action behind the mutagenic effects of 4-NOPD and OPD: the role of DNA damage, oxidative stress and an imbalanced nucleotide pool2013In: Mutagenesis, ISSN 0267-8357, E-ISSN 1464-3804, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 637-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mutagenicity of 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (4-NOPD) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD) was compared using the Mouse Lymphoma Assay (MLA) with or without metabolic activation (S9). As expected, OPD was found to be a more potent mutagen than 4-NOPD. To evaluate possible mechanisms behind their mutagenic effects, the following end points were also monitored in cells that had been exposed to similar concentrations of the compounds as in the MLA: general DNA damage (using a standard protocol for the Comet assay); oxidative DNA damage (using a modified procedure for the Comet assay in combination with the enzyme hOGG1); reactive oxygen species (ROS; using the CM-H(2)DCFDA assay); and the balance of the nucleotide pool (measured after conversion to the corresponding nucleosides dC, dT, dG and dA using high-performance liquid chromatography). Both compounds increased the level of general DNA damage. Again, OPD was found to be more potent than 4-NOPD (which only increased the level of general DNA damage in the presence of S9). Although less obvious for OPD, both compounds increased the level of oxidative DNA damage. However, an increase in intracellular ROS was only observed in cells exposed to 4-NOPD, both with and without S9 (which in itself induced oxidative stress). Both compounds decreased the concentrations of dA, dT and dC. A striking effect of OPD was the sharp reduction of dA observed already at very low concentration, both with and without S9 (which in itself affected the precursor pool). Taken together, our results indicate that indirect effects on DNA, possibly related to an unbalanced nucleotide pool, mediate the mutagenicity and DNA-damaging effects of 4-NOPD and OPD to a large extent. Although induction of intracellular oxidative stress seems to be a possible mechanism behind the genotoxicity of 4-NOPD, this pathway seems to be of less importance for the more potent mutagen OPD.

  • 2.
    Golkar, Siv Österman
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Czene, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. AstraZeneca R&D, Safety Assessment, Dept Genet Toxicol, AstraZeneca, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Gokarakonda, Amulya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Haghdoost, Siamak
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Intracellular deoxyribonucleotide pool imbalance and DNA damage in cells treated with hydroxyurea, an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase2013In: Mutagenesis, ISSN 0267-8357, E-ISSN 1464-3804, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 653-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imbalance in the nucleotide pool of mammalian cells has been shown to result in genotoxic damage. The goal of this study was to devise a sensitive, reproducible and simple method for detection of nucleotide pool changes in mammalian cells that could be used for problem-solving activities in drug development, e.g. mechanistic explanation of a positive response in a mammalian in vitro genotoxicity test. The method evaluated in this study is based on ethanol extraction of the total nucleotide pool, heat treatment and filtration, treatment with calf intestine alkaline phosphatase to convert nucleotides to nucleosides and analysis of the nucleosides by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The method was applied to measure the intracellular levels of deoxyribonucleotides in mouse lymphoma (ML) L5178Y cells treated with various concentrations of a model compound, hydroxyurea (HU), a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor. DNA strand breakage and micronuclei formation were assessed in the same experiments. Imbalance of nucleotide pool (i.e. changes in the relative ratios between individual nucleotide pools) in HU-treated ML cells has been observed already at a concentration of 0.01 mmol/l, whereas genotoxic effects became apparent only at higher concentrations of HU (i.e. 0.25 mmol/l and higher) as indicated by formation of DNA strand breaks and micronuclei.

  • 3.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Czene, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Haghdoost, Siamak
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Harms-Ringdahl, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Transient delay of radiation-induced apoptosis by phorbol acetate2016In: Radiation and Environmental Biophysics, ISSN 0301-634X, E-ISSN 1432-2099, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 95-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms of interference of a model tumour promoter 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) with radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral lymphocytes have been investigated. The cells were treated with TPA under various conditions and thereafter exposed to a single lethal dose of gamma radiation. Morphological and biochemical changes characteristic of apoptosis were followed up to 72 h of post-irradiation time. Acute exposure to low concentration of TPA resulted in delay in the onset of radiation-induced apoptosis (determined as morphological changes and rate of mitochondrial demise) by 24-48 h as compared to the irradiated, sham TPA-treated cells. The time course of this delay correlated well with confinement of the p53 protein to the cytoplasm and increase in bcl-2 levels at the nuclear periphery of irradiated cells. Our results indicate that confinement of p53 in the cytoplasm is one of the potential mechanisms by which TPA interferes with the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphocytes.

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