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  • 1.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Anna Hofman-Uddgren2017In: Women Film Pioneers ProjectArticle, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Att saluföra modernitet: Numa Petersons handels- och fabriksaktiebolag2006In: 1897 Mediehistorier kring Stockholmsutställningen, Statens ljud- och bildarkiv , 2006, p. 167-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Becoming American in 1910?: Pathé Frères' Settlement in New Jersey2005In: Quarterly Review of Film and Video, ISSN 1050-9208, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 251-262Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Corporeality and Female Modernity: Intermediality and Early Film Celebrities2018In: The Image in Early Cinema: Form and Material / [ed] Scott Curtis, Philippe Gauthier, Tom Gunning, Joshua Yumibe, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2018, p. 174-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As Victorianism lost its grip and industrialism entered a new phase, gender roles and the expressions of femininity became malleable and negotiable. Women’s new independence and mobility in modern society, particularly in the large cities, ushered in a “female modernity” underpinned by the relaxing of dress codes with a sporty look mirroring a general reconfiguring of women’s range of physical options. In the process, the New Woman became an entry in the cultural lexicon.

    The purpose of this article is to explore the female body as a key site for inscribing and performing modernity across media during the first 15 years of the 20th century. The cultural conception of this modern type of femininity, characterized by independence, resourcefulness—and exploitation as the flipside—found its template in the female film stars and their physical wherewithal and abilities at large, especially in the serial films. Outside cinema, the desirable stars were marketed in newspapers, trade papers, women’s magazines, and ads, even in autobiographical works. The intense mediatisation of the life styles and panache embodied by these women on and off screen blended into a complex and iconic cocktail of modern femininity, attractive for some, shocking for others. In the early 1910s, a radical change can be observed concerning the concept of female celebrities at large across many fields of endeavor with cinema driving the process by repurposing images across media formats such as postcards, advertisements, and printed illustrations.

    The key issues of this article are: To analyze screen-action heroine Pearl White and Annette Kellerman, an Australian professional swimmer turned vaudeville and film star in the US, as two comparative career case studies. The discourses around their achievements and celebrity will be discussed from advertisements, news and trade press articles, photographic collectibles, and a phalanx of promotional materials forming rounded career stories around two emblematic New Women; To investigate female film stars in relation to discursive negotiations of social mobility, independence, gender roles, and corporeal ideals across media.

  • 5.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Den negativa estetiken i The Invisible Man1997In: Aura: Filmvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1400-8386, Vol. 3, no 1-2, p. 90-98Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Eva Bakøy och Tore Helseth (red.): Den andre norske filmhistorien2012In: Norsk Medietidsskrift, ISSN 0804-8452, E-ISSN 0805-9535, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 81-83Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Exporting Perilous Pauline: Pearl White and serial film craze2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exceptionally popular during their time, the spectacular American action film serials of the 1910s featured exciting stunts, film tricks, and effects set against the background of modern technology, often starring resourceful female heroines who displayed traditionally male qualities such as endurance, strength, and authority. The most renowned of these "serial queens" was Pearl White, whose career as the adventurous character Pauline developed during a transitional phase in the medium's evolving production strategies, distribution and advertising patterns, and fan culture. In this volume, an international group of scholars explores how American serials starring Pearl White and other female stars affected the emerging cinemas in the United States and abroad. Contributors investigate the serial genre and its narrative patterns, marketing, cultural reception, and historiographic importance, with essays on Pearl White's life on and off the screen as well as the "serial queen" genre in Western and Eastern Europe, India, and China.

    Contributors are Weihong Bao, Rudmer Canjels, Marina Dahlquist, Monica Dall'Asta, Kevin B. Johnson, Christina Petersen, and Rosie Thomas.

  • 8.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Fantômas and the Creation of a Fugitive Character2000In: Aura: Film Studies Journal, ISSN 1400-8386, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 26-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Film, hygien och flugor: Hälsovårdskampanjer i USA 1909-19152005In: Under Ytan: Humanistdag-boken nr 18, Humanistiska fakultetsnämnden vid Göteborgs universitet , 2005, p. 63-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Global versus Local: The Case of Pathé2005In: Film History: An International Journal, ISSN 0892-2160, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Health Entrepreneurs: American Screen Practices in the 1910s2014In: Screen Culture and the Social Question 1880-1914 / [ed] Ludwig Vogl-Bienek, Richard Crangle, New Barnet: John Libbey Publishing, 2014, p. 137-148Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Health Instruction on Screen: The Department of Health in New York City, 1909-19172012In: Beyond the Screen: Institutions, Networks and Publics of Early Cinema / [ed] Marta Braun, Charlie Keil, Rob King, Paul Moore, Louis Pelletier, New Barnet, U.K.: John Libbey Publishing, 2012, p. 107-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Health on Display: The Panama-Pacific International Exposition as Sanitary Venue2014In: Performing New Media: 1890-1915 / [ed] Kaveh Askari, Scott Curtis mfl, New Barnet: John Libbey Publishing, 2014, 1, p. 174-185Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early 20th century teemed with progressive initiatives aimed at improving and modernizing American everyday life. These uplift campaigns, initiated in top-down fashion, zoomed in on sanitation, working conditions, childcare, education, and recreation. The strive for better health conditions brought together a cross-section of civic movements and organizations, which in turn inspired the implementation of governmental infrastructures at federal, state or municipal level.

    In exhibitions and campaign work, visual materials were often used in order to catch the public’s attention. Moving pictures’ putative pedagogical might and potential for civic education underpinned the work to raise awareness about modern society and its social and sanitary shortcomings, or ”evils” in contemporary vernacular. From 1910 on, and in this spirit, moving pictures were regularly taken up as a pedagogical tool for health campaigns in a multitude of contexts across the U.S. Even if moving pictures were perhaps the most important vehicle for public health work, an array of visual media was brought together for maximum intermedial exposure for the causes at hand:  lantern slides, models, posters, pamphlets, cartoons, billboards, newspaper articles and ads.

    An important venue, in a sense summing up an array of visual health campaigns and placing them adjacent to each other, as it were, within a broader form of exhibition practice, was the Panama Pacific Exposition in San Francisco 1915. This chapter explores the health exhibits and their use of media at PPE in the multitude of national as well as international projects put on display. Among the participants were the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission for the Eradication of Hookworm Disease (a campaign that would get a more international direction after 1915), the U.S. sanitary campaign in Panama, the Bureau of Public Health Education (a specialized branch within the Department of Health of the City of New York), the Fly-Fighting Committee of the American Civic Association, to mention only a select few. And for additional emphasis, October 12, 1915 was singled out as a Health Day at the exhibition. Due to the anthology of sanitary displays in place, PPE became a key progressive hub by putting public health on the agenda and creating added social awareness for such issues. Furthermore, these didactic initiatives and exhibition practices would serve as a model also for future work outside the U.S.

  • 14.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Pearl White2010Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical career profile of Pearl White

  • 15.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Screening Congo in Swedish churches: Johan Hammar's missionary films 1915-162010In: Domitor 2008: les Cinémas périphériques dans la période des premiers temps / [ed] François Amy de la Bretèque et al., Perpignan: Presses Universitaires de Perpignan, Institut Jean Vigo Perpignan, Museu del Cinema Girona , 2010, 1, p. 257-268Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This text examines Swedish missionary films pre-1920 with a focus on Johan Hammar's surviving films from Congo 1915-1916. The programming and distribution of missionaries' films is analyzed in relation to the Mission Union's attitude to moving pictures as both a brand of popular entertainment and an unrivaled educational form.

  • 16.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Snow-White: The Aesthetic and Narrative Use of Snow in Swedish Silent Film1999In: Nordic Explorations: Film Before 1930, John Libbey Publishing , 1999, p. 236-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Stockholm Olympics at the Movies2014In: International Journal of the History of Sport, ISSN 0952-3367, E-ISSN 1743-9035, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 588-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a contribution to the special issue on the Olympic Games in Stockholm in 1912 commissioned by Christian Widholm. The text discusses the 1912 Olympics as a major media event with a special focus on the production, distribution and reception of moving pictures

  • 18.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    "Swat the Fly": Educational Films and Health Campaigns 1909-19142008In: Kinoöffentlichkeit: Cinema's Public Sphere (1895-1920), Schüren Verlag , 2008, p. 211-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Teaching Citizenship via Celluloid2008In: Early Cinema and the "National", John Libbey Publishing , 2008, p. 118-131Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The Attractions of the North: Early Film Expeditions to the Exotic Snowscape2014In: Films on Ice: Cinemas of the Arctic / [ed] Scott Mackenzie, Anna Westerståhl Stenport, Edingburgh: Edingburgh University Press , 2014, 1, p. 279-285Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    The Invisible Seen in French Cinema before 19172001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the inception of cinema, an important strand of the medium has focused on itself, on what it depicts, and its indexical relation to the profilmic. Such concerns were most conspicuously put forward by the trick-film genre which bypassed conventional realism in its toying with the photographic image as well as cinematic movement. The main concern of the trick genre’s multifarious manipulations was directed towards the principal focus within the frame, the malleable bodies of figures/characters. Incessant transformations of the content of the frame turned the cinematographic representation into a state of flux by creating an apparently realistic space, but one permeated with fantastic occurrences. Questions of what was visible or not, and possible to depict or not, became focal points within these not only synthetic versions of filmic space, but spaces that routinely severed their profilmic links.

    This dissertation probes two somewhat different but interrelated practices: vision made difficult, and making visible what is otherwise not seen with the naked eye. The construction of cinematic invisibility furnishes a paramount example of a counter-visual tendency manifested within the frame of a medium not only based on the visual but on the idea of being an indexical imprint of reality. Invisibility therefore challenges the replicating abilities of the cinematographic medium, but simultaneously displays the medium's prowess to depict phenomena impinging on reality in different fashions. The many guises of this theme were gradually transferred from a performance context within a theatrical setting to a quasi-realistic narrative of sorts. These simple stories were often set in urban surroundings, where the phenomenon of invisibility was explained by means of technologies, inventions or other aspects brought about by modern society.

    Trick work played a central role when it came to the development of cinematic techniques and changes in narrative strategies. The complexity of the trick-film genre and its hybrids exceeds the purely spectacular and the apparent simplicity of the tricks themselves. This study displays and analyzes the wide range of applications of the trick mode. The same underlying conception to make visible the otherwise invisible can be found not only in trick films proper, but also in féeries, early animated films, biblical films, and scientific films, and in a less obvious sense even in comic films, detective and crime films. By this process of colonization or absorption, the cinematic depiction of invisible realms became conspicuous facets of filmmaking during the years 1896-1916, especially in three of the main production companies in France, namely Star-Film, Pathé Frères and Gaumont. The multitude of approaches to invisibility offers insight into the non-visual dimensions of a visual and technological medium, apart from upgrading the historiographical importance of trick films.

  • 22.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    'They Thought it was a Marvel'. Arthur Melbourne-Cooper (1874-1961), Pioneer of Puppet Animation2011In: Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, ISSN 0143-9685, E-ISSN 1465-3451, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 121-123Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Tricks in Transition: Genres, Devices, Receptions2004In: The Cinema: A New Technology for the 20th Century, Editions Payet Lausanne , 2004, p. 243-256Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Unhooking the Hookworm: The Rockefeller Foundation and Mediated Health2015In: Mediating Peace: Reconciliation through Visual Art, Music and Film / [ed] Sebastian Kim, Pauline Kollontai och Sue Yore, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, p. 335-350Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before the 1948-founding of the World Health Organization, the International Health Board/Division (IHB) was the world’s leading agency for public health work. Its efforts emanated from Rockefeller Sanitary Commission (1909-1914), inaugurated to shape a health infrastructure in the American South and mainly to eradicate hookworms. The singling out of hookworms and the ”laziness epidemic” in the south was due to it being an easily identifiable, treatable, and preventable disease calling for public health initiatives.

    IHB’s initial efforts were directed towards the British West Indies. My paper will discuss the international campaign strategies aimed at cultural reconciliation by eliminating differences in sanitary and social conditions worldwide. The political implications were considerate: the disease was associated with crime and degeneracy—and social activism and health campaigns came with an Americanization slant. IHB hoped to spread the European and American ”scientific model” of public health and make it a universal norm. In the process, scores of media were mobilized to spread medical awareness defined as a civilizing project. The Rockefeller-film Unhooking the Hookworm (1920) was the key educational tool. It became a centerpiece in the organization’s medial education and the film’s multiple versions neatly illustrate their search for a formula with an international appeal in trans-cultural contexts for diverse audiences. This text discuss campaigns initiated by the IHB in British Guiana, Jamaica and Puerto Rico, during the period 1914-1932. I will focus on the strategies, the problems encountered by health officers, the visual materials used—and the intricacies of local receptions.

  • 25.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Unhooking the Hookworm: The Rockefeller Foundation and Mediated Health2012Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Upplysning2008In: Film och andra rörliga bilder — en introduktion, Raster Förlag , 2008, p. 40-55Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Yvette Andreyor, Josette Andriot, Alexandre Arquillière, J. Stuart Blackton, Georges Dureau, David S. Hulfish2005In: Encyclopedia of Early Cinema, Routledge , 2005, p. 24-25, 39, 75Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 27 of 27
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