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  • 1.
    Hedlin, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    A procedure for stratification by an extended Ekman rule2000In: Journal of Official Statistics, ISSN 0282-423X, E-ISSN 2001-7367, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 15-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the Ekman rule, which is a well-known method for univariate stratification that approximately minimises the variance of the ordinary expansion estimator. An efficient numerical algorithm for the Ekman rule is presented.

  • 2.
    Hedlin, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Estimating totals in some U.K. business surveys2002In: Statistics in Transition, ISSN 1234-7655, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 943-968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses estimation of the total for some study variables in two business surveys conducted by the U.K. Office for National Statistics. The paper is mainly focused on design-based methods. We ask what the desirable properties of an estimator are and explore several point estimators in a simulation study.

  • 3.
    Hedlin, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Is there a ‘safe area’ where the nonresponserate has only a modest effect on nonresponsebias despite non-ignorable nonresponse?2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rising nonresponse rates in social surveys makes the issue of nonresponse bias highly contentious. Nonresponse may induce bias and increase data collection costs. We study the relationship between response rate and bias, assuming non-ignorable nonresponse and focusing on estimates of totals or means. We show that there is a ‘safe area’ enclosed by the response rate on the one hand and the correlation between the response propensity and the study variable on the other hand; in this area, 1) the response rate does not greatly affect the nonresponse bias and 2) the nonresponse bias is small.

  • 4.
    Hedlin, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Mitt icke-wallraffande bland undersökningar2017In: Qvintensen, ISSN 2000-1819, no 1, p. 9-12Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Hedlin, Dan
    Departement of Social statsitics,University of Southampton, the United Kingdom.
    On the Stratification of Highly Skewed Populations (No. 1998:3). R&D Report.1998Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers the combined problem of allocation and stratification in order to minimise the variance of the expansion estimator of a total, taking into account that the population is finite. The proof of necessary minimum variance conditions utilises the Kuhn-Tucker Theorem. Stratified simple random sampling with non-negligible sampling fractions is an important design in sample surveys. We go beyond limiting assumptions that have often been used in the past, such as that the stratification equals the study variable or that the sampling fractions are small. We discuss what difference the sampling fractions will make for stratification. In particular, in many surveys the sampling fraction equals one for some strata. The main theorem of this article is applied to a business population.

  • 6.
    Hedlin, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Score functions to reduce business survey editing at the UK Office for National Statistics2003In: Journal of Official Statistics, ISSN 0282-423X, E-ISSN 2001-7367, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 177-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A score function associates a number to each item response. The function indicates the relative importance of allocating manual resources to review responses, thereby allowing the survey analyst to prioritise editing efforts. By applying different score functions to the Monthly Inquiry for the Distribution and Services Sector the article discusses how to measure the effectiveness of a score function, and what it is that makes this method effective at reducing manual editing. One finding is that the effectiveness of the technique is rather insensitive to the type of score function. In many situations it is useful to specify a threshold that splits the responses into two groups where manual editing is directed at responses with scores above the threshold. The article suggests a simple graphical tool that allows the analyst to assess the threshold.

  • 7.
    Hedlin, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Small area estimation: a practitioner’s appraisal2008In: Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali, ISSN 0035-676X, E-ISSN 1827-7918, no 4, p. 407-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demands of regional statistics combined with pressure to reduce costs and response burden has lead to great interest in Small Area Estimation. Both researchers and practitioners take part in a largely very successful development that still is moving rapidly. However, the National Statistical Institutes in Europe have been rather hesitant to implement SAE, partly because of the different tradition of SAE in terms of statistical inference. NSIs are obliged to as far as possible publish officials statistics that are based on estimators with negligible bias. Fear of model misspecification has been a hindrance to wide application of SAE. Use of a model is now seen as a quality issue. Communication of methods and the resulting quality of statistics is an issue that NSIs have recently given specific attention to.

  • 8.
    Hedlin, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Using Administrative Data for Statistical Purposes2015In: The Survey Statistician, no 71, p. 34-41Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Hedlin, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Why are design in survey sampling and design of randomised experiments separate areas of statistical science?2015In: Festschrift in Honor of Hans Nyquist on the occasion of his 65th birthday / [ed] Ellinor Fackle-Fornius, Stockholms universitets förlag, 2015, p. 82-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hedlin, Dan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Chambers, Ray
    van den Brakel, Jan
    Lehtonen, Risto
    Zhang, Li-Chun
    Future challenges of small area estimation2006In: Statistics in transition, ISSN 1234-7655, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 759-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A panel discussion session entitled as “Future Challenges of Small Area Estimation” was organized in the SAE2005 Conference, with Ray Chambers as the organizer and chair and Jan van den Brakel, Dan Hedlin, Marie Cruddas, Risto Lehtonen, Imbi Traat and Li-Chun Zhang as the discussants. The output of the panel discussion session is summarized in this paper. Each contributor is responsible of the respective piece of text; the paper has been edited by the chairman of the session.

  • 11.
    Hedlin, Dan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Dale, Trine
    Haraldsen, Gustav
    Jones, Jaqui
    Developing methods for assessing perceived response burden: a joint report of Statistics Sweden, Statistics Norway and the UK Office for National Statistics2005Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Hedlin, Dan
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Falvey, Hannah
    Quarterly Capital Expenditure Inquiry Review1998Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Hedlin, Dan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Falvey, Hannah
    Office for National Statistics, U.K..
    Chambers, Ray
    Kokic, Phil
    University of Southampton.
    Does the model matter for GREG estimation?: a business survey example2001In: Journal of Official Statistics, ISSN 0282-423X, E-ISSN 2001-7367, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 527-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although asymptotically design-unbiased, GREG estimators may produce bad estimates. The paper examines the behaviour of GREG estimators when the underlying models are misspecified. It shows how an efficient GREG estimator was found for a business survey that posed some problems. The work involved data exploration in several steps, combined with analyses of g-weights, residuals and standard regression diagnostics. We discuss two diagnostics for whether a GREG estimate is reasonable or not. A common justification for the use of GREG estimators is that, being asymptotically design unbiased, they are relatively robust to model choice. However, we show that the property of being asymptotically design unbiased is not a substitute for a careful model specification search, especially when dealing with the highly variable and outlier prone populations that are the focus of many business surveys.

  • 14.
    Hedlin, Dan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Fenton, Trevor
    Pont, Mark
    McDonald, John
    Wang, Suojin
    Estimating the undercoverage of a sampling frame due to reporting delays2006In: Journal of Official Statistics, ISSN 0282-423X, E-ISSN 2001-7367, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 53-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the imperfections of a sampling frame is miscoverage caused by delays in recording real-life events that change the eligibility of population units. For example, new units generally appear on the frame some time after they came into existence and units that have ceased to exist are not removed from the frame immediately. We provide methodology for predicting the undercoverage due to delays in reporting new units. The approach presented here is novel in a business survey context, and is equally applicable to overcoverage due to delays in reporting the closure of units. As a special case, we also predict the number of new-born units per month. The methodology is applied to the principal business register in the UK, maintained by the Office for National Statistics.

  • 15.
    Hedlin, Dan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Isaksson, Annica
    Orusild, Tiina
    Svensson, Jörgen
    Urval: från teori till praktik2008Book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Hedlin, Dan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Lindqvist, Helen
    Erikson, Johan
    Bäckström, Helena
    An experiment on perceived survey response burden among businesses2008In: Journal of Official Statistics, ISSN 0282-423X, E-ISSN 2001-7367, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 301-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an experiment embedded in a business survey, subsamples were randomized to obtain none, both or either of two motivation-enhancing enclosures that went out with the covering letter: a sheet explaining the purpose of the survey and another sheet informing about feedback of survey results. All businesses obtained a questionnaire on perceptions of the survey. The main conclusion is that perceptions of the usefulness of the survey are improved by the enclosures while there is no evidence of an effect on perceptions of how burdensome the survey is.

  • 17.
    Hedlin, Dan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Wang, Suojin
    Texas A&M University, Department of Statistics, College Station, Texas.
    Feeding back information on ineligibility from sample surveys to the frame2004In: Survey Methodology, ISSN 0714-0045, E-ISSN 1492-0921, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is usually discovered in the data collection phase of a survey that some units in the sample are ineligible even if the frame information has indicated otherwise. For example, in many business surveys a nonnegligible proportion of the sampled units will have ceased trading since the latest update of the frame. This information may be fed back to the frame and used in subsequent surveys, thereby making forthcoming samples more efficient by avoiding sampling nonnegligible units. We investigate what effect on survey estimation the process of feeding back information on ineligibility may have, and derive an expression for the bias that can occur as a result of feeding back. The focus is on estimation of the total using the common expansion estimator. We obtain an estimator that is nearly unbiased in the presence of feed back. This estimator relies on consistent estimates of the number of eligible and ineligible units in the population being available.

  • 18. Welsh, Alan H.
    et al.
    Hedlin, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Šova, Markus G.
    The Stabilisation of Model Parameter Estimates from Repeated Surveys with Rare Observations2013In: Australian & New Zeeland Journal of Statistics, ISSN 1467-842X, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 471-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many surveys, the domains of study are small and the samples that carry information on a domain can be very small indeed. If the survey is conducted repeatedly there is often a high degree of overlap in samples over time. We show how to use the richness of information over time to compensate for the paucity of cross-sectional information. We propose a model-based estimator of the population total based on stabilised parameter estimates that combine information from different survey periods that are adjacent in time.  The motivating example for this research has been the ProdCom survey as implemented in the UK.

1 - 18 of 18
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