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  • 1.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rostami, Asreen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wang, Jinyi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The IKEA Catalogue: Design fiction in academic and industrial collaborations2016In: Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Supporting Group Work, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 335-344Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an introduction to the “Future IKEA Catalogue”, enclosed here as an example of a design fiction produced from a long standing industrial-academic collaboration. We introduce the catalogue here by discussing some of our experiences using design fictionwith companies and public sector bodies, giving some background to the catalogue and the collaboration which produced it.

  • 2.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McGregor, Moira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    100 days of iPhone use: understanding the details of mobile device use2014In: Proceedings of the 16th international conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices & services, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 223-232Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet connected mobile devices are an increasingly ubiquitous part of our everyday lives and we present here the results from unobtrusive audio-video recordings of iPhone use -- over 100 days of device use collected from 15 users. The data reveals for analysis the everyday, moment-by-moment use of contemporary mobile phones. Through video analysis of usage we observed how messages, social media and internet use are integrated and threaded into daily life, interaction with others, and everyday events such as transport, delays, establishment choice and entertainment. We document various aspects of end-user mobile device usage, starting with understanding how it is occasioned by context. We then characterise the temporal and sequential nature of use. Lastly, we discuss the social nature of mobile phone usage. Beyond this analysis, we reflect on how to draw these points into ideas for design.

  • 3.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    O'Hara, Kenton
    McGregor, Moira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Text in Talk: Lightweight Messages in Co- Present Interaction2018In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 24, no 6, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While lightweight text messaging applications have been researched extensively, new messaging applications such as iMessage, WhatsApp, and Snapchat offer some new functionality and potential uses. Moreover, the role messaging plays in interaction and talk with those who are co-present has been neglected. In this article, we draw upon a corpus of naturalistic recordings of text message reading and composition to document the face-to-face life of text messages. Messages, both sent and received, share similarities with reported speech in conversation; they can become topical resource for local conversation-supporting verbatim reading aloud or adaptive summaries. Yet with text messages, their verifiability creates a distinctive resource. Similarly, in message composition, what to write may be discussed with collocated others. We conclude with discussion of designs for messaging in both face-to-face, and remote, communication.

  • 4.
    Brown, Barry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Weilenmann, Alexandra
    McMillan, Donny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Five Provocations for Ethical HCI Research2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 852-863Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present five provocations for ethics, and ethical research, in HCI. We discuss, in turn, informed consent, the researcher-participant power differential, presentation of data in publications, the role of ethical review boards, and, lastly, corporate-facilitated projects. By pointing to unintended consequences of regulation and oversimplifications of unresolvable moral conflicts, we propose these provocations not as guidelines or recommendations but as instruments for challenging our views on what it means to do ethical research in HCI. We then suggest an alternative grounded in the sensitivities of those being studied and based on everyday practice and judgement, rather than one driven by bureaucratic, legal, or philosophical concerns. In conclusion, we call for a wider and more practical discussion on ethics within the community, and suggest that we should be more supportive of low-risk ethical experimentation to further the field.

  • 5. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    McMillan, DonaldStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Girouard, AudreyTholander, JakobStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Welcome to ACM TEI'18, the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interactions, hosted at KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, in Stockholm, Sweden, from the 18th to the 21st of March 2018. This is TEI's first visit to Scandinavia! The TEI conference series is dedicated to issues of human-computer interaction, novel tools and technologies, interactive art, and user experience. This year's conference focuses on the concepts of physical and material interaction through the lens of Post-Digital Design. The digital has become mundane, inseparable from our everyday experiences. In post-digital design we see a turn to vintage materials and craftsmanship, but also to real world circumstances of human bodies on a global scale. Old media and natural materials have regained interest for interaction designers, and traditional practices are being cherished in new ways as part of digital experiences. Designing for the post-digital does not mean blindly embracing nostalgia or turning away from technology - it means embracing a process of design that equalizes the status of digital, analogue, electronic, mechanical and tactile, and that brings focus to form, meaning and function, rather than technicalities. The intimate size of this single-track conference provides a unique forum for exchanging ideas and presenting innovative work through talks, interactive exhibits, demos, hands-on studios, posters, art installations and performances. TEI'18 hosts a four-day program, starting on Sunday March 18th with the Graduate Student Consortium and a series of Studios that engage participants in the concrete making of novel interfaces and interactions. The main program starts with an opening keynote on Monday March 19th, followed by a series of talks on shape changing materials, followed by a hands-on session showcasing Work in Progress demonstrations as well as exemplars from full papers accepted to the proceedings. The Tuesday starts with the remainder of the demonstrations and the Student Design Challenge, this year with a theme of common place, mundane technologies from the future. Paper presentations on technology for children, and Virtual and Augmented reality precede a second session of demos from full paper submissions. The evening of the second day finds the conference in Kulturhuset, Stadsteatern, one of the largest cultural institutions in Northern Europe, for a curated exhibition of art installations and live performances exploring the post-digital. A total of 25 works will be presented over the evening, which is also open to the public. On Wednesday, March 21st, sessions present talks on evaluation and community, followed by a closing panel session.

  • 6. Kompatsiaris, Ioannis
    et al.
    Cave, JonathanSatsiou, AnnaCarle, GeorgPassani, AntonellaKontopoulos, EfstratiosDiplaris, SotirisMcMillan, DonaldStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Internet Science: Proceedings2017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book constitutes the proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Internet Science held in Thessaloniki, Greece, in November 2017. The 34 papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected for inclusion in this volume. They were organized in topical sections named: next generation community engagement; online policy, politics and co-creation; understanding and empowering digital citizens; data-driven research and design; social media and online interaction.

  • 7.
    Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Faraj, Zarah
    Nemutlu Cambazoglu, Deha
    Virtala, Christian
    Friendly but not Friends: Designing for Spaces Between Friendship and Unfamiliarity2017In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Communities and Technologies, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While urban life requires us to maintain a healthy social distance and anonymity from others, a recurring design goal has been to push against this anonymity and assist in the formation of communities. In contrast, our aim in this paper is to design for keeping others at a comfortable distance, without seeming rude or uncongenial. Building on findings from 20 interviews and two design workshops, we present three design explorations that illustrate opportunities to support a sense of friendly connection in local, communal spaces, without promoting the formation of friendship or other long-term engagements, or requiring the effort and commitment they would necessarily demand.

  • 8.
    McGregor, Moira
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    SICS, Sweden.
    100 days of iPhone use: mobile recording in the wild2014In: CHI '14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: proceeding, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 2335-2340Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents preliminary results from an unobtrusive video study of iPhone use--totalling over 100 days of everyday device usage. The data gives us a uniquely detailed view on how messages, social media and internet use are integrated and threaded into daily life, our interaction with others, and everyday events such as transport, communication and entertainment. These initial results seek to address the when, who and what of situated mobile phone use--beginning with understanding the impact of context

  • 9.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Connecting Citizens: Designing for Data Collection and Dissemination in the Smart City2017In: Internet Science: Proceedings / [ed] Ioannis Kompatsiaris, Jonathan Cave, Anna Satsiou, Georg Carle, Antonella Passan, iEfstratios Kontopoulos, Sotiris Diplaris, Donald McMillan, Springer, 2017, p. 119-131Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents two case studies of citizen data collection and dissemination applications, developed for or by three different local authorities in Northern Europe. These case studies highlight the challenges in meeting the goals of Open Data, of involving citizens as sources of information, and of engendering and maintaining trust as a service provider all at the same time. The challenge of making data open can be seen as at odds with protecting the privacy and safety of citizens when it is sourced directly or indirectly from their actions. Encouraging citizens to collect, curate, and submit data can create misguided expectations of influence over the processes of local government, and disillusionment where action or feedback are not forthcoming. A local authority is trusted to provide information that is verified and for which it is accountable. Balancing this with goal of disseminating the results of citizen sourced data collection activities can result in frustration for developers, users, and local authority employees. In response to these issues this paper presents the following four design opportunities: probabilistic and personalised representations of data, making accountable the use of collected data, respecting the boundaries of data, and designing for the graceful degradation of resources.

  • 10.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Implicit Interaction Through Machine Learning: Challenges in Design, Accountability, and Privacy2017In: Internet Science: Proceedings / [ed] Ioannis Kompatsiaris, Jonathan Cave, Anna Satsiou, Georg Carle, Antonella Passani, Efstratios Kontopoulos, Sotiris Diplaris, Donald McMillan, Springer, 2017, p. 352-358Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implicit Interaction takes advantage of the rise of predictive algorithms, trained on our behaviour over weeks, months and years, and employs them to streamline our interactions with devices from smartphones to Internet connected appliances. Implicit Interaction provides users the advantage of systems that learn from their actions, while giving them the feedback and controls necessary to both understand and influence system behaviour without having to rely on an application for every connected device. This is an active area of research and as such presents challenges for interaction design due, in part, to the use of user-facing machine learning algorithms. This paper discusses the challenges posed by designing in accountability for system actions and predictions, the privacy concerns raised by both the sensing necessary to power these predictions and in how the predictions and systems actions themselves can expose behavioural patterns, and the challenges inherent in designing for the reality of machine learning techniques rather than the hype.

  • 11.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The Smartwatch in Multi-device Interaction2017In: Design, User Experience, and Usability: Designing Pleasurable Experiences: Proceedings, Part II / [ed] Aaron Marcus, Wentao Wang, Springer, 2017, p. 275-287Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wearable devices are typically not used on their own. Indeed, many are sold specifically as companion devices to mobile phones. Here, we take a close look at smartwatch use in its natural multi-device context, building on a corpus of 1009 in vivo smartwatch use incidents recorded with twelve participants over 168 h. We examine closely four exemplar clips, exploring glances for information during other tasks, maintenance tasks that allow the allocation of spare attention, the smartwatch in conversation around media consumption, and the physical constraints of its embodied use on the wrist alongside other devices. Our study sheds light on current smartwatch use practices alongside devices with more established use scenarios, and on how the smartwatch changes and disrupts those practices.

  • 12.
    McMillan, Donald
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McGregor, Moira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hoggan, Eve
    Pizza, Stefania
    Situating Wearables: Smartwatch Use in Context2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 3582-3594Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on 168 hours of video recordings of smartwatch use, this paper studies how context influences smartwatch use. We explore the effects of the presence of others, activity, location and time of day on 1,009 instances of use. Watch interaction is significantly shorter when in conversation than when alone. Activity also influences watch use with significantly longer use while eating than when socialising or performing domestic tasks. One surprising finding is that length of use is similar at home and work. We note that usage peaks around lunchtime, with an average of 5.3 watch uses per hour throughout a day. We supplement these findings with qualitative analysis of the videos, focusing on how use is modified by the presence of others, and the lack of impact of watch glances on conversation. Watch use is clearly a context-sensitive activity and in discussion we explore how smartwatches could be designed taking this into consideration.

  • 13.
    McMillan, Donald
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Engström, Arvid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Data and the City2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 2933-2944Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider how data is produced and used in cities. We draw on our experiences working with city authorities, along with twenty interviews across four cities to understand the role that data plays in city government. Following the development and deployment of innovative data-driven technology projects in the cities, we look in particular at collaborations around open and crowdsourced data, issues with the politicisation of data, and problems in innovating within the highly regulated public sphere. We discuss what this means for cities, citizens, innovators, and for visions of big data in the smart city as a whole.

  • 14.
    McMillan, Donald
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Loriette, Antoine
    Living with Listening Services: Privacy and Control in IoT2015In: Internet Science: Second International Conference, INSCI 2015, Brussels, Belgium, May 27-29, 2015, Proceedings / [ed] Thanassis Tiropanis, Athena Vakali, Laura Sartori, Pete Burnap, Springer, 2015, p. 100-109Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the impact to home, work, and civil life from the deployment of continuous listening services. An example service we call the Continuous Speech Stream (CSS), would provide a real time list of keywords generated from the user’s spoken interactions with others. Based on a user-study that engaged 10 users to record a full day of audio for processing into a sample stream, we report the concerns expressed by our participants on being misrepresented by their speech, unintentionally sharing sensitive data, and being unable to curate their presentation of self. We offer an initial set of recommendations for the design, testing, and deployment of IoT based services built on such rich, personal data.

  • 15.
    McMillan, Donny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sellen, Abigail
    Lindley, Siân
    Martens, Roy
    Pick up and play: understanding tangibility for cloud media2015In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, New York: ACM Press, 2015, p. 3-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition from local and personally owned file-based media management to cloud-based streaming services such as Spotify and Netflix brings new opportunities for users, but also leaves gaps in their understanding and practice. In this paper we present findings from an interview study that explored early adopters’ complex relationships with their collections which spanned physical, digital and cloud media. From this we entered a design process focussing on new material forms for cloud based media. Based on this we discuss our design and point to areas where, tangible or not, affordances from physical and digital media are available to be explored in the cloud. Looking in particular at the concepts of scarcity, gifting, and identity we outline possible reasons why, and why not, they could be incorporated into cloud media services.

  • 16. Pizza, Stefania
    et al.
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Smartwatch in vivo2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 5456-5469Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the smartwatch has returned as a form factor for mobile computing with some success. Yet it is not clear how smartwatches are used and integrated into everyday life differently from mobile phones. For this paper, we used wearable cameras to record twelve participants' daily use of smartwatches, collecting and analysing incidents where watches were used from over 34 days of user recording. This allows us to analyse in detail 1009 watch uses. Using the watch as a timepiece was the most common use, making up 50% of interactions, but only 14% of total watch usage time. The videos also let us examine why and how smartwatches are used for activity tracking, notifications, and in combination with smartphones. In discussion, we return to a key question in the study of mobile devices: how are smartwatches integrated into everyday life, in both the actions that we take and the social interactions we are part of?

  • 17.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rostami, Asreen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Fischione, Carlo
    Turchet, Luca
    Musicians' initial encounters with a smart guitar2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 13-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case study of a fully working prototype of the Sensus smart guitar. Eleven professional guitar players were interviewed after a prototype test session. The smartness of the guitar was perceived as enabling the integration of a range of equipment into a single device, and the proactive exploration of novel expressions. The results draw attention to the musicians' sense-making of the smart qualities, and to the perceived impact on their artistic practices. The themes highlight how smartness was experienced in relation to the guitar's agency and the skills it requires, the tension between explicit (e.g. playing a string) and implicit (e.g. keeping rhythm) body movements, and to performing and producing music. Understanding this felt sense of smartness is relevant to how contemporary HCI research conceptualizes mundane artefacts enhanced with smart technologies, and to how such discourse can inform related design issues.

  • 18.
    Rostami, Asreen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Márquez Segura, Elena
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Bio-Sensed and Embodied Participation in Interactive Performance2017In: Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 197-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing for interactive performances is challenging both in terms of technology design, and of understanding the interplay between technology, narration, and audience interactions. Bio-sensors and bodily tracking technologies afford new ways for artists to engage with audiences, and for audiences to become part of the artwork. Their deployment raises a number of issues for designers of interactive performances. This paper explores such issues by presenting five design ideas for interactive performance afforded by bio-sensing and bodily tracking (i.e. Microsoft Kinect) developed during two design workshops. We use these ideas, and the related scenarios to discuss three emerging issues namely: temporality of input, autonomy and control, and visibility of input in relation to the deployment of bio-sensors and bodily tracking technologies in the context of interactive performances.

  • 19.
    Rostami, Asreen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Hook, Jonathan
    Taylor, Robyn
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spence, Jocelyn
    Williamson, Julie
    Design Fiction for Mixed-Reality Performances2017In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 498-505Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing for mixed-reality performances is challenging both in terms of technology design, and in terms of understanding the interplay between technology, narration, and (the outcomes of) audience interactions. This complexity also stems from the variety of roles in the creative team often entailing technology designers, artists, directors, producers, set-designers and performers. In this multidisciplinary, one-day workshop, we seek to bring together HCI scholars, designers, artists, and curators to explore the potential provided by Design Fiction as a method to generate ideas for Mixed-Reality Performance (MRP) through various archetypes including scripts, programs, and posters. By drawing attention to novel interactive technologies, such as bio-sensors and environmental IoT, we seek to generate design fiction scenarios capturing the aesthetic and interactive potential for mixed-reality performances, as well as the challenges to gain access to audience members' data -- i.e. physiological states, daily routines, conversations, etc.

  • 20.
    Rostami, Asreen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spence, Jocelyn
    Taylor, Robyn
    Hook, Jonathan
    Williamson, Julie
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Glimpses of the future: designing fictions for mixed-reality performances2018In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 46-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21. Sahlgren, Magnus
    et al.
    Ylipää, Erik
    Brown, Barry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Helms, Karey
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    McMillan, Donald
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    The Smart Data Layer2018In: 2018 AAAI Spring Symposium Series, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence , 2018, p. 185-188Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the notion of a smart data layer for the Internet of Everything. The smart data layer can be seen as an AI that learns a generic representation from heterogeneous data streams with the goal of understanding the state of the user. The smart data layer can be used both as materials for design processes and as the foundation for intelligent data processing.

1 - 21 of 21
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