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  • 1.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Flykten till institutionerna: socialt kapital, valinformation och etnisk mobilisering2004In: Politisk annonsering eller nätverkande?: uppföljning och utvärdering av partiernas särskilda informationsinsatser till invandrarväljare vid 2002 års val / [ed] Henry Bäck, Maritta Soininen, Göteborg: Förvaltningshögskolan , 2004, p. 223-258Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Patterns of Environmental Collective Action: Some Cross-National Findings2011In: Political Studies, ISSN 0032-3217, E-ISSN 1467-9248, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 900-920Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many environmental problems such as global warming, biodiversity loss and waste accumulation can be described as large-scale collective action dilemmas. Previous research on collective action in Common Pool Resource settings has demonstrated that institutional structures and social capital are important for successful management of natural resources. The objective of this article is to investigate the effect of such factors on large-scale environmental collective action. The analysis employs survey data and indicators of institutional quality for 22 countries. Two measurements of environmental collective action are used: (1) intermediate group collective action; and (2) latent group environmental action. Findings point to a dominating role for two factors - institutional quality and membership in voluntary organisations - as key determinants of participation in both latent and intermediate group environmental collective action. These results are interpreted as indications of a possible decoupling between trust and participation in large-scale collective action.

  • 3.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    RESILIENCE THINKING: LESSONS FOR PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION2016In: Public Administration, ISSN 0033-3298, E-ISSN 1467-9299, Vol. 94, no 2, p. 364-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of resilience is rapidly gaining influence in public administration practice and research, but a more comprehensive resilience research agenda in public administration is yet to emerge. This article aims to clarify how experiences and potential contributions from social-ecological resilience research can inform resilience studies in public administration. By contrasting key components of the resilience paradigm and its policy prescriptions with established findings from public administration research, a set of key shortcomings of social-ecological resilience thinking are identified: (1) deterministic systems models; (2) simplified accounts of politics and policy; and (3) a lack of systematic and generalizable empirical studies. To avoid these shortcomings, it is suggested that public administration resilience studies should explore multiple and competing models for how resilience can be generated; analyse trade-offs between resilience and other values of public administration; avoid systems theoretical resilience models; and apply the notion of resilience in areas beyond crisis management.

  • 4.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The four faces of the environmental state: environmental governance regimes in 28 countries2016In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 69-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary task for the environmental state is to address problems related to the market's externalisation of environmental costs. It has four main resources at its disposal: regulation, redistribution, organisation, and knowledge generation. The way these four resources are deployed make up a state's environmental governance arrangements. Using data on environmental regulation, taxes, public administrations, and knowledge production from 28 countries, and a hierarchical cluster analysis, four different types of environmental states are identified: established, emerging, partial, and weak. This is followed by some suggestions for further research on the environmental state in a comparative perspective.

  • 5.
    Duit, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Feindt, Peter H.
    Meadowcroft, James
    Greening Leviathan: the rise of the environmental state?2016In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bringing the state back in' to research on comparative, inter-, and trans-national environmental politics and policy will contribute to better understanding of the limits and prospects of contemporary approaches to environmental politics and the overall evolution of contemporary states once environmental issues become central. The rationale for the state as an analytical perspective in environmental policy and politics is explained, and an empirically oriented concept of the environmental state is introduced, along with a tentative sketch of its evolution in historical perspective. A research agenda on the environmental state is mapped out, centring around variation and convergence in environmental states across space and time; the political/economic dynamics of contemporary environmental states; and inter-linkages among environmental problems, the constitution of political communities, and the functioning of the public power. In conclusion, the ways in which the contributions to this volume address that research agenda are introduced.

  • 6.
    Duit, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Galaz, Victor
    interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Governance and Complexity—Emerging Issues for Governance Theory2008In: Governance: An International Journal of Policy, Administration and Institutions, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 311-335Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Duit, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Ebbesson, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Governance, complexity, and resilience2010In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 363-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue brings together prominent scholars to explore novel multilevel governance challenges posed by the behavior of dynamic and complex social-ecological systems. Here we expand and investigate the emerging notion of “resilience” as a perspective for understanding how societies can cope with, and develop from, disturbances and change. As the contributions to the special issue illustrate, resilience thinking in its current form contains substantial normative and conceptual difficulties for the analysis of social systems. However, a resilience approach to governance issues also shows a great deal of promise as it enables a more refined understanding of the dynamics of rapid, interlinked and multiscale change. This potential should not be underestimated as institutions and decision-makers try to deal with converging trends of global interconnectedness and increasing pressure on social-ecological systems.

  • 8.
    Duit, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Löf, Annette
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Fragmenterad förvirring eller kreativ arena? Från ”government” till ”governance” i svensk naturvårdspolitik.2009In: Samhällsstyrning i förändring / [ed] Pierre, Jon & Sundström, Göran, Malmö: Liber , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Duit, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hall, Ola
    KTH- Royal Institute of Technology.
    Mikusinski, Grzegorz
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Angelstam, Per
    Swedish University of Agricultural Science.
    Saving the Woodpeckers: Social Capital, Governance, and Policy Performance2009In: Journal of Environment and Development, ISSN 1070-4965, E-ISSN 1552-5465, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 42-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates if higher levels of social capital,better governance structures, and a more ambitious conservationpolicy are positively linked to the ability of states to addressbiodiversity loss. Serving this purpose is a data set containingestimates of woodpecker diversity in 20 European countries.These data are argued to be a more valid indicator of biodiversitythan most other available cross-national measures of environmentalquality. A seemingly unrelated regression analysis reveals thatnone of the indicators are linked to higher levels of woodpeckerdiversity, which in turn leads to the conclusion that presentinstitutions, environmental policies, and social structureshave negligible effects on biodiversity compared to long-termlandscape transformations.

  • 10.
    Duit, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Löf, Annette
    Dealing With a Wicked Problem? A Dark Tale of Carnivore Management in Sweden 2007-20112018In: Administration & Society, ISSN 0095-3997, E-ISSN 1552-3039, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 1072-1096Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we investigate whether increased participation offers a way of addressing wicked policy problems. We utilize a natural policy experiment in the form of a 2010 reform of Swedish wildlife management policy aiming to solve longstanding conflicts over predators through increased stakeholder participation in regional Wildlife Management Boards. Using a panel study design containing quantitative and qualitative data, we estimate pre- and post-reform levels of three wickedness-reducing mechanisms: legitimacy, deliberation, and conflict intensity. Despite a substantial increase in participation, we find no evidence of reduced wickedness after the reform.

  • 11.
    Hall, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Duit, Andreas
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. interfaculty units, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Caballero, L.N.C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    World Poverty, Environmental Vulnerability and Population at Risk for Natural Hazards2008In: Journal of Maps, Vol. 2008, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Lim, Sijeong
    et al.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Partisan politics, welfare states, and environmental policy outputs in the OECD countries, 1975-20052018In: Regulation and Governance, ISSN 1748-5983, E-ISSN 1748-5991, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 220-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on the burgeoning literature on the association between the welfare state and the environmental state, this study empirically examines how the politics of the former has affected the development of the latter. We suggest that the size of the welfare state shapes the calculus of environmental policy costs by partisan governments. A generous welfare state lowers the costs perceived by the left-wing government, as large redistributive spending allows the government to mitigate the adverse impact of the new environmental policy on its core supporters, industrial workers. A generous welfare state also implies diminished marginal political returns from additional welfare commitment by the left-wing government, which lowers the opportunity costs of environmental policy expansion. To the contrary, because of lower overall regulatory and taxation pressure, a small welfare state reduces the costs of environmental policy expansion as perceived by a right-wing government. Our theoretical narrative is supported in a dynamic panel data analysis of environmental policy outputs in 25 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development member states during the period 1975-2005.

  • 13.
    Mohedano Roldán, Alba
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Schultz, Lisen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Does Stakeholder Participation Increase the Legitimacy of Nature Reserves in Local Communities? Evidence from 92 Biosphere Reserves in 36 CountriesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Orach, Kirill
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sustainability of natural resource governance under interest group competition in policy makingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-state actors play an increasingly important role in environmental policy processes. Lobbying activities of interest groups have often been associated with policy stasis and environmental degradation. Little is known, however, about the causal mechanisms through which competition between diverse interest groups can enhance or reduce the adaptive capacity of a governance system. By combining an empirical study with agent-based modelling we explore competing interest group behavior and its implications for responses of the policy system to perceived changes in a fishery. We find that interest group coalition formation as a response to changes in the resource allows the policy system to better respond to resource decline. This mechanism, however, is highly contingent on the distribution of funding among interest groups, issue salience and characteristics of the political system (beliefs of policymakers). Testing the mechanism of interest group influence on policy change allows us to better understand the conditions under which environmental policymaking involving diverse interests and strong (economic/industry) pressure can avoid resource overexploitation.

  • 15.
    Schultz, Lisen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Participation, Adaptive Co-management, and Management Performance in the World Network of Biosphere Reserves2011In: World Development, ISSN 0305-750X, E-ISSN 1873-5991, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 662-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyzing survey-responses from 146 Biosphere Reserves in 55 countries we investigate how stakeholder participation and adaptive co-management practices are linked to management performance. Effectiveness in conventional conservation was positively affected by participation of scientists, but negatively affected by participation of volunteers. Effectiveness in sustainable development goals was associated to participation by local inhabitants. Adaptive co-management practices were associated with a higher level of effectiveness in achieving development goals, and this higher effectiveness did not seem to be at the expense of biodiversity conservation.

  • 16.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Dellmuth, Lisa M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    NGO Influence in International Organizations: Information, Access, and Exchange2018In: British Journal of Political Science, ISSN 0007-1234, E-ISSN 1469-2112, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 213-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is broad consensus that non-governmental organizations (NGOs) sometimes succeed in influencing policy-making within international organizations (IOs), there is much less agreement on the factors and conditions that make NGO lobbying effective. In this article, we make two contributions to this debate. First, we examine the determinants of influence among NGOs active in different IOs, issue areas, and policy phases. The analysis builds on original survey data of more than 400 NGOs involved in five different IOs, complemented by elite interviews with IO and state officials. Second, we advance a specific argument about how the strategic exchange of information and access between NGOs and IOs increases NGO influence in IOs. We contrast this argument, derived from theories of lobbying in American and European politics, with three alternative explanations of NGO influence, privileging material resources, transnational networks, and public-opinion mobilization, and sketch the broader implications of our results for research on NGOs in global governance.

  • 17.
    Valman, Matilda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute. Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    HELCOM, we have a problem: gradually unfolding crises and problem detection in international organisationsIn: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Valman, Matilda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Duit, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Organizational responsiveness: The case of unfolding crises and problem detection within HELCOM2016In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 70, p. 49-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How and to what extent do international organizations detect, process and react to different types of change within their policy domains? This study addresses this question by combining a unique data set consisting of policy documents from the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM) with data measuring ecosystem change in the Baltic Sea during the period 1980-2013. Here HELCOM's responses to two types of ecosystem changes are investigated: fast and visible (summer algae blooms) and slow and opaque (anoxic areas). Finally, this study assesses if the organizational reform of 2007, which introduced the ecosystem approach, has had any effects on HELCOM responsiveness. It is found that HELCOM, contrary to expectations, is only responding systematically to slow-moving and opaque processes but that this response confirms the anticipated organizational bottom-up pattern. The ecosystem approach reform seems to have had a negative effect on the responsiveness of HELCOM; however, a general trend is that HELCOM over time has become more responsive in the lower levels of the organization. The lack of an immediate effect regarding the ecosystem approach reform can serve as a reminder of the absence of panaceas in policy making in general, and in environmental governance in particular.

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