Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Magnusson, K.
    Voluntary deposit-limit as a tool for reducing gambling intensity among customers of an online gambling platform: A randomized controlled trial2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To compare gambling intensity between users of an online gambling service prompted to set a deposit limit and non-prompted customers, in the whole sample and among most active users based on total number of gambling days. Design: A randomized controlled trial with three prompted (N=1098/1110/1055) and one unprompted control condition (N=1065) and gambling activity of each participant followed for 90 days starting at account registration. Setting. A publicly governed online gambling operator from Finland. Interventions: The prompted participants received a one-time prompt to set a voluntary deposit limit of optional size either 1) at-registration, 2) before or 3) after they made their first deposit. Participants in the control condition were not prompted. Participants: All Finnish customers of the gambling service having registered an account during the study recruitment period with online slots as preferred gambling category during the 90 days following the registration. Measures: Gambling intensity was measured with aggregated net loss (NL), with proportions of limit-setters, sum of deposits and number of gambling days used as secondary outcomes. Findings: In the whole sample, the three intervention groups did not differ in either proportion of participants with positive NL (BF10prop=0.007) or size of positive net loss (BF10size=0.016), the results being similar for the most involved gamblers (BF10prop=0.030; BF10size=0.082). The pooled intervention group did not differ from the control group regarding proportion of gamblers with positive NL (OR(95%CI)=0.991(0.836–1.176); p=.921) or size of NL (B(95%CI) =-0.080(-0.229-0.069); p=.291), the results applying to the most involved gamblers (proportion positive NL: OR(95%CI)=0.834(0.492-1.412), p =.498; NL size: B(95%CI)=0.042(-0.359-0.442), p =.838). The three intervention groups had higher rates of limit-setters and NL was highest among participants who have increased/removed a deposit-limit. Conclusion: Prompting users of an online gambling service to set a voluntary deposit limit of optional size did not affect subsequent NL compared to unprompted participants.

  • 2.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Magnusson, Kristoffer
    Deposit-limits and online gambling intensity: A randomised controlled trial2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Pathological gambling is recognized as a public health issue in a many countries. Consequently, helping individuals control their gambling behaviors is critical. One strategy is setting a pre-committed limit for how much money one can lose, deposit or win. The aim of the study was to compare gambling intensity between online gamblers prompted to set a deposit limit and non-prompted customers.

    Methods: All customers of the gambling service having registered an account during the study recruitment period were included. Gambling intensity was measured with aggregated net loss, with proportions of limit-setters, sum of deposits and number of gambling days used as secondary outcomes.

    Intervention: A total of 4328 customers of a gambling operator from Finland were randomized to receive a prompt to set a voluntary deposit limit of optional size either 1) at registration, 2) before or 3) after their first deposit, or 4) to an unprompted control condition.

    Results: The intervention groups did not differ in either proportion of participants with positive net loss or size of positive net loss. The pooled intervention group did not differ from the control group regarding proportion of gamblers with positive net loss or size of net loss. The intervention groups had higher rates of limit-setters and net loss was highest among participants who had increased/removed a deposit-limit. 

    Conclusions: Prompting online gamblers to set a voluntary deposit limit of optional size did not affect subsequent net loss.

  • 3.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Responsible provision of online gambling: Effects, usability and gamblers’ experiences of protective measures implemented in online gambling environments2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem gambling is considered a public health problem in many countries and is associated with serious financial and health-related harms for both problem gamblers and significant others. It is possible to create gambling environments that would promote sustainable gambling behaviors and prevent excessive gambling. However, research on the effectiveness of tools for responsible provision of gambling is scarce and the quality of the research is low. Also, there exists a conflict of interest between making a profit when providing gambling and protecting vulnerable customers. The general aim of the project was to study the effects, usability and gamblers’ experiences of tools for responsible provision of online gambling. Study I evaluated the effects of a prompt to set voluntary deposit-limit of optional size among 4,328 customers of an online gambling platform. During the data collection period, all customers from Finland registering an account on the gambling platform were randomized into being prompted to set a deposit-limit either 1) at-registration, 2) before their first deposit, 3) after their first deposit or 4) to an unprompted control group. Gambling intensity, measured with aggregated net loss, was tracked during 90 days after registration. No differences in gambling intensity between the intervention and control groups were found neither on the whole-group level (B (95% CI) =-0.080 (-0.229-0.069), p=.291), nor in the subgroup of the most involved gamblers (B (95% CI) =0.042(-0.359-0.442), p=.838). Study II aimed at predicting gaming freeze (as a proxy parameter for problem gambling) in online gamblers. For the sample of N=2,618 (N=1,309 freezers), a total of 105 predictors were created based on the data tracked by the gambling platform. The analysis was carried out using the machine learning method Random Forest. The predictive accuracy of the model applied to the dataset was 0.615, with a specificity of 0.686 and a sensitivity of 0.543. Study III aimed at investigating non-problem gamblers’ experiences of protective measures. A total of N=10,200 active customers of an online gambling platform were asked to rate their previous experiences of protective tools, their inclination to abandon a gambling service due to perceived overexposure to protective measures and answer questions on their symptoms of problem gambling. N=1,223 responded to the questionnaire, with the majority of the sample being moderate-risk gamblers (38.5%), followed by low-risk gamblers (26.8%), non-problem gamblers (18.9%) and problem gamblers (15.8%). In general, non-problem gamblers were not more disturbed by protective measures than other categories of gamblers. More problem gamblers have previously abandoned a gambling service due to perceived overexposure to protective measures compared to non-problem gamblers (OR(95% CI)= 7.17(3.61-14.23), p<.001). In conclusion, a prompt to set a voluntary deposit-limit of optional size did not appear to be effective in decreasing gambling intensity in online gamblers, indicating the need of evaluating alternative designs. Predicting gaming freezes in the current project resulted in a low accuracy, indicating that gaming freeze is not suitable as a proxy measurement for problem gambling and suggesting the need for collecting subjective data on symptoms of problem gambling. The results of Study III suggest that protective measures can be tested and implemented without the risk of disturbing recreational gamblers.

  • 4.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Lindner, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Using the Random Forest Algorithm on Customer Gambling Data for Predicting Gambling Freezes in an Online Gambling PlatformManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Data on gambling behaviors routinely collected on online gambling platforms can be used to detect individuals at risk of developing or having gambling problems. As only data on gambling activity is available on gambling platforms, it is important to find a proxy measure for gambling problems. Temporarily freezing one or several gambling categories has potential to serve this purpose. Aim. To predict gambling freeze in a sample of active users of an online gambling platform one week before the freeze, based on one week of behavioral data tracked on the platform. Method. N = 105 predictors were created, covering total values, frequencies, variations, and trajectories of monetary and time-related gambling involvement, number and type of games played, point in time when gambling occurred, age, and gender. The random forest algorithm was applied to a sample of N = 2618 gamblers (of which N = 1309 freezers), with the sample divided 70/30 into a training and testing data set. Results. The accuracy of random forest applied to the testing data set was 0.615, with sensitivity of 0.543 and specificity of 0.686. The five most predictive variables were current age, age on registration date, average session length, average sum of winnings per session, and total session length. Discussion. The predictive accuracy of the algorithm in the current study was relatively low, suggesting the need for a more suitable target variable. Also, analyzing data collected during a longer period might be needed to create a tool that could be used to identify at-risk gamblers.

  • 5.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindner, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Dahlin, M.
    Ly, H.
    Vernmark, K.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet & Karolinska Institutet.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Guided and unguided CBT for social anxiety disorder and/or panic disorder via the Internet and a smartphone application2015In: Abstracts from the 7th Swedish Congress on internet interventions (SWEsrii), Linköping: Linköping University Press , 2015, p. 9-9Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) becomes a part of the clinical practice, the interest for alternative ways of providing it continue to grow. Internet-based CBT, both guided and unguided, has proved to be effective for the treatment of a wide range of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety disorders. Moreover, the tremendous accessibility of smartphones makes them a potentially powerful instrument for providing psychological treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an Internet-based ACT-program for social anxiety disorder and panic disorder using both computers and smartphones, and with and without therapist support. Method: The participants were recruited from the general public by filling out an online screening form, which consisted of LSAS, PDSS-SR, GAD-7, PHQ-9, QOLI (the scales later served as outcome measures) and demographic questions. The individuals who met the inclusion criteria were contacted for a diagnostic telephone interview. The 152 people chosen for participation were then randomized into two treatment groups (guided and unguided) and a waiting list control group. The participants in the treatment groups were given access to an Internet-provided ACT-based treatment program consisting of 8 modules, as well as a smartphone application with content that corresponded to the Internet treatment program. Additionally, the participants in the guided group received minimum therapist support (15 min/week) through the smartphone application from psychology students undergoing their clinical training. The participants worked with the program for 10 weeks. They were evaluated twice during treatment, once after completing treatment, and once again 12-months later as a follow-up measure. A mixed effect model was used to analyze the data. Results: Regardless of diagnosis, as a whole the treated groups showed significant decreases in anxiety, with a moderate within-group effect size. This improvement appeared to be maintained when the groups were evaluated again during the follow-up. The participants suffering primarily from social anxiety disorder showed significant improvements, with moderate within-group effect sizes in both the guided (Cohen's d = 0.79) and unguided group (Cohen's d = 0.71). This improvement also appeared to be maintained when these participants were evaluated during the follow-up. No significant changes were observed in the symptoms of the participants suffering primarily from panic disorder. Discussion: Internet-delivered ACT-based treatment provided via both computer and smartphone can be effective for reducing general anxiety symptoms, as well as social anxiety symptoms. The guided treatment was not clearly superior to the unguided treatment. Some of the study’s uncertainties are likely due to the presence of a large number of different components, which made it difficult to isolate the effects of each individual component.

  • 6.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Lindner, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Dahlin, Mats
    Vernmark, Kristofer
    Ly, Kien Hoa
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Guided and unguided transdiagnostic Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for anxiety disorders provided via a computer and a smartphone application: A randomized controlled trial2016In: EABCT 2016 Abstract Book: Total Awareness, 2016, p. 530-530Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology-assisted psychological treatments are becoming well-known in the scientific networks throughout the world and are being implemented into routine health care in a number of countries. The interest in evaluating the potential of different devices is growing. The main objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of guided and unguided computerand smartphone-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) and panic disorder (PD).

    A total of 152 participants were randomized into a guided treatment group, an unguided treatment group and a waiting list control group. Both treatment groups got access to a computer-based ACT-treatment and a smartphone application (app) with corresponding content. The eight modules treatment program covered a number of topics such as the nature of anxiety, functional analyses, acceptance, mindfulness and valued actions. The purpose of the app was to make it easier for the participants to access the key points of the program and to do homework assignments in their everyday life. Automatic messages in the app aimed to give feedback to the participants on their work as well as to prompt them to continue with the program. In addition to that, the participants in the guided group got therapist support via the app. The therapists were encouraged to work with each of their patient 15 min/week during the 10 weeks treatment period and focus on motivating, validating and correcting mistakes. On the whole group level GAD-7 was used as the primary outcome measure. LSAS and PDSS-SR were used for subgroup analyses in SAD and PD participants respectively. The measurements were collected at pre-, mid- and post-treatment and at 12-months follow-up.

    There were no significant differences in adherence between the treatment groups except for significantly higher rates of smartphone usage in the guided group. No significant differences in treatment outcome were found between the treatment groups with moderate within-group effects (Cohen’s d = 0.75 for the guided and Cohen’s d = 0.66 for the unguided group). The treated participants improved significantly in comparison to the control group both on the whole group level (between group Cohen’s d = 0.39) and for the participants suffering primarily from SAD (between group Cohen’s d = 0.70). Within group effect sizes were large for the PD-participants (Cohen’s d = 1.00) but the study was very underpowered in this part.

    Discussion. The treatment program as it was used in the present study appeared to be effective in treating social anxiety disorder and decreasing general anxiety symptoms, but the effects are smaller than seen in previous studies. The guided treatment was not clearly superior to the unguided one. The study contributes to the growing body of evidence on technology-assisted ACT.

    Conclusion. Computer- and smartphone-based ACT can be made into an effective treatment for anxiety disorders. A smartphone application seems to have a clear potential to partly compensate for the absence of therapist support which needs to be studied further.

  • 7.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Lindner, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ly, Kien Hoa
    Dahlin, Mats
    Vernmark, Kristofer
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Guided and unguided Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for social anxiety disorder and/or panic disorder provided via the Internet and a smartphone application: A randomized controlled trial2016In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 44, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) can be effective in treating anxiety disorders, yet there has been no study on Internet-delivered ACT for social anxiety disorder (SAD) and panic disorder (PD), nor any study investigating whether therapist guidance is superior to unguided self-help when supplemented with a smartphone application. In the current trial, n = 152 participants diagnosed with SAD and/or PD were randomized to therapist-guided or unguided treatment, or a waiting-list control group. Both treatment groups used an Internet-delivered ACT-based treatment program and a smartphone application. Outcome measures were self-rated general and social anxiety and panic symptoms. Treatment groups saw reduced general (d = 0.39) and social anxiety (d = 0.70), but not panic symptoms (d = 0.05) compared to the waiting-list group, yet no differences in outcomes were observed between guided and unguided interventions. We conclude that Internet-delivered ACT is appropriate for treating SAD and potentially PD. Smartphone applications may partially compensate for lack of therapist support.

  • 8.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Magnusson, Kristoffer
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Deposit Limit Prompt in Online Gambling for Reducing Gambling Intensity: A Randomized Controlled Trial2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pre-commitment tools – allowing users of gambling services to pre-set a limit for how much money they may spend – are relatively common. However, there exist no clear evidence of their effectiveness in preventing gamblers from spending more money than they otherwise planned. The aim of the study was to compare gambling intensity between users of an online gambling service prompted to set a deposit limit and non-prompted customers, both in the whole sample and among most active users based on the total number of gambling days. Prospective customers of a publicly governed gambling operator from Finland were randomized to receive a prompt to set a voluntary deposit limit of optional size either (1) at registration, (2) before or (3) after their first deposit, or (4) to an unprompted control condition. Data on customers from Finland with online slots as a preferred gambling category (N = 4328) were tracked in the platform for 90 days starting at account registration, gambling intensity being measured with aggregated net loss. The intervention groups did not differ from each other in either proportion of participants with positive net loss or size of positive net loss. The pooled intervention group did not differ from the control group regarding proportion of gamblers with positive net loss (OR = 1.0; p = 0.921) or size of net loss (B = -0.1; p = 0.291). The intervention groups had higher rates of limit-setters compared to the control condition (ORat-registration/pre-deposit/post-deposit = 11.9/9.2/4.1). Customers who have increased/removed a previously set deposit limit had higher net loss than the limit-setters who have not increased/removed their limit (Bat-registration/pre-deposit/post-deposit/control = 0.7/0.6/1.0/1.3), and unprompted limit-setters lost more than unprompted non-setters (B = 1.0). Prompting online gamblers to set a voluntary deposit limit of optional size did not affect subsequent net loss compared to unprompted customers, motivating design and evaluation of alternative pre-commitment tools. Setting a deposit limit without a prompt or increasing/removing a previously set limit may be a marker of gambling problems and may be used to identify customers in need of help.

  • 9.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Rafi, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Lindner, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Experiences of responsible gambling tools among non-problem gamblers: A survey of active customers of an online gambling platform2019In: Addictive Behaviors Reports, ISSN 2352-8532, E-ISSN 2076-3387, Vol. 9, article id 100161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Responsible gambling (RG) tools, aiming at helping gamblers to avoid gambling-related harms, are common in online gambling platforms. Gambling industry, policy makers, and researchers have warned that RG tools can potentially disturb recreational gamblers, channeling them to less protective operators. No evidence exists to support these concerns, and they can hinder the development of effective RG tools. The current study aimed to investigate the recreational gamblers' experiences of RG tools.

    Methods: A total of 10,200 active customers of an online gambling service were invited to complete an online survey and rate their overall reactions, attitudes, disturbance and irritation towards RG tools, as well as their inclination to abandon a gambling service due to overexposure to RG tools. N = 1223 surveys were completed.

    Results: Non-problem gamblers had positive experiences of RG tools. Moderate-risk gamblers had more positive overall reaction and less irritation to previous experiences of RG tools compared to non-problem gamblers. Problem gamblers had least positive attitudes, most disturbance and most irritation towards RG pictures. Non-problem gamblers had lowest rates of having abandoned a service because of perceived overexposure to RG tools (5.2% compared to 25.9% of problem gamblers), with a significant between-group difference (OR [95%CI] = 7.17 [3.61–14.23], p < .001).

    Conclusions: Non-problem gamblers were not particularly disturbed by RG tools and were not at risk of abandoning online gambling services because of overexposure to RG tools. The study found no grounds for limiting the design and implementation of RG tools due to fears of disturbing recreational gamblers.

  • 10.
    Rafi, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Rozental, Alexander
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Effects of a workplace prevention programme for problem gambling: Study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 9, article id e015963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Despite being considered a public health problem, no prevention programme for problem gambling in workplace settings has been scientifically evaluated. This study aims to fill a critical gap in the field of problem gambling by implementing and evaluating a large-scale prevention programme in organisations.

    Methods and analysis: Ten organisations, with a total of n=549 managers and n=8572 employees, will be randomised to either receiving a prevention programme or to a waitlist control condition. Measurements will be collected at the baseline and 3, 12 and 24 months after intervention. The primary outcome of interest is the managers’ inclination to act when worried or suspicious about an employee’s problem gambling or other harmful use. Additional outcomes of interest include the Problem Gambling Severity Index and gambling habits in both managers and employees. Furthermore, qualitative analyses of the responses from semistructured interviews with managers will be performed.

    Ethics and dissemination: This study has been approved by the regional ethics board of Stockholm, Sweden, and it will contribute to the body of knowledge concerning prevention of problem gambling. The findings will be published in peer-reviewed, open-access journals.

    Trial registration number: NCT02925286; Pre-results.

  • 11.
    Rafi, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Ivanova, Ekaterina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Rozental, Alexander
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Carlbring, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology. University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Participants' Experiences of a Workplace-Oriented Problem Gambling Prevention Program for Managers and HR Officers: A Qualitative Study2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplace health promotion programs (WHPPs) refer to a set of health promotion and protection strategies implemented at a worksite and designed to meet the health and safety needs of employees. One important question for WHPPs is how middle management experience their participation in a WHPP. This study aims to explore this question further by applying a qualitative content analysis to interviews with thirteen managers and ten human resource officers participating in a WHPP focusing on problem gambling. The WHPP consisted of two components: policy implementation and skills-development training. The participants were interviewed about their experiences of these two components and the implementation process. The qualitative content analysis resulted in six themes: (1) Expectations of the skills-development training, (2) Experiences of and prior beliefs about problem gambling, (3) A good foundation, (4) The difficult conversation, (5) Appreciated aspects of the training sessions, and (6) Remaining obstacles. The results suggest that the presentation of cases, facts, and general knowledge was appreciated by most participants. However, participants also expressed that they would benefit from tailored interventions, more support in the policy implementation process, and following up on the results.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf