Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Buitrago, Elina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Transition metal catalyzed reduction of ketones2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Buitrago, Elina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Transition metal-catalyzed reduction of carbonyl compounds: Fe, Ru and Rh complexes as powerful hydride mediators2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A detailed mechanistic investigation of the previously reported ruthenium pseudo-dipeptide-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of aromatic ketones was performed. It was found that the addition of alkali metals has a large influence on both the reaction rate and the selectivity, and that the rate of the reaction was substantially increased when THF was used as a co-solvent. A novel bimetallic mechanism for the ruthenium pseudo-dipeptide-catalyzed asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones was proposed.

    There is a demand for a larger substrate scope in the ATH reaction, and heteroaromatic ketones are traditionally more challenging substrates. Normally a catalyst is developed for one benchmark substrate, and a substrate screen is carried out with the best performing catalyst. There is a high probability that for different substrates, another catalyst could outperform the one used. To circumvent this issue, a multiple screen was executed, employing a variety of ligands from different families within our group’s ligand library, and different heteroaromatic ketones to fine-tune and to find the optimum catalyst depending on the substrate. The acquired information was used in the formal total syntheses of (R)-fluoxetine and (S)-duloxetine, where the key reduction step was performed with high enantioselectivities and high yield, in each case.

    Furthermore, a new iron-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalyzed hydrosilylation (HS) protocol was developed. An active catalyst was formed in situ from readily available imidazolium salts together with an iron source, and the inexpensive and benign polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS) was used as hydride donor. A set of sterically less demanding, potentially bidentate NHC precursors was prepared. The effect proved to be remarkable, and an unprecedented activity was observed when combining them with iron. The same system was also explored in the reduction of amides to amines with satisfactory results.

  • 3.
    Buitrago, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundberg, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    High Throughput Screening of a Catalyst Library for the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Heteroaromatic Ketones: Formal Syntheses of (R)-Fluoxetine and (S)-Duloxetine2012In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 2082-2089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 21 amino acid based ligands including hydroxy amide, thioamide, and hydroxamic acid functionalities, respectively, were combined with [Ru(p-cymene)Cl2]2 and [RhCp*Cl2]2, and used as catalysts for the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of four different heteroaromatic ketones in 2-propanol. The reactions were performed on a Chemspeed automated high-throughput screening robotic platform. Optimal catalysts were identified for the individual heterocyclic substrate classes. Based on these results, the formal syntheses of the antidepressant drugs (R)-fluoxetine and (S)-duloxetine were conducted by using the found catalysts in the key reaction step, which results in high isolated yields (94?%) and excellent product enantioselectivities (>99?% ee) of the formed 1,3-amino alcohols.

  • 4.
    Buitrago, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundberg, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Aztra Zeneca, Global Process R&D, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective reduction of heteroaromatic ketones: A combinatorial approach2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones is a most productiveway towards enantio enriched secondary alcohols used in the preparation of biologically active compounds. There are numerous transition metal catalyzed methods for this transformation, particularly based on Ru(II)-and Rh(I)-complexes, but there is a demand for a larger substrate scope. Heteroaromatic ketones are traditionally more challenging substrates. Normally a catalyst is developed for one benchmark substrate, and asubstrate screen is made with the best performing catalyst. Using this methodology, there is a high probability that for different substrates, another catalyst could outperform the one used. We have executed a multiple screen, containing a variety of different ligands together with both Ru and Rh, and heteroaromatic ketones to fine-tune, and find the optimum catalyst depending on the substrate. The acquired information was used to synthesize known, biologically active compounds, where the key reduction steps were performed with high enantioselectivities and yields.

  • 5.
    Buitrago, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tinnis, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Efficient and Selective Hydrosilylation of Carbonyls Catalyzed by Iron Acetate and N-Hydroxyethylimidazolium Salts2012In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 354, no 1, p. 217-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aromatic aldehydes, along with aryl alkyl, heteroaryl alkyl, and dialkyl ketones were efficiently reduced to their corresponding primary and secondary alcohols, respectively, in high yields, using the commercially available and inexpensive polymeric silane, polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS), as reducing agent. The reaction is catalyzed by in situ generated iron complexes containing hydroxyethyl-functionalized NHC ligands. Turnover frequencies up to 600 h−1 were obtained

  • 6.
    Buitrago, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zani, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Fe/NHC-catalyzed hydrosilylation of aromatic ketones2009In: Abstracts of Papers, 238th ACS National Meeting, Washington, DC, United States, August 16-20, 2009, Washington, DC: American Chemical Society , 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Buitrago, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zani, Lorenzo
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective hydrosilylation of ketones catalyzed by in situ-generated iron NHC complexes2011In: Applied organometallic chemistry, ISSN 0268-2605, E-ISSN 1099-0739, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 748-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aryl alkyl-, heteroaryl alkyl- and dialkyl ketones were readily reduced to their corresponding secondary alcohols in high yields, using the commercially available and inexpensive polymeric silane polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS), as reducing agent. The reaction is catalyzed by an in situ-generated iron complex, conveniently generated from iron(II) acetate and the commercially available N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) precursor IPr·HCl.

  • 8.
    Volkov, Alexey
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Buitrago, Elina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Direct Hydrosilylation of Tertiary Amides to Amines by an In Situ Formed Iron/N-Heterocyclic Carbene Catalyst2013In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, no 11, p. 2066-2070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tertiary amides were efficiently reduced to their corresponding tertiary amines in high isolated yields by using the commercially available and inexpensive polymeric silane polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS) as the reducing agent. The reaction is efficiently catalyzed by an in situ generated iron/N-heterocyclic carbene complex (1 mol-%) obtained from iron(II) acetate and 1-(2-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl)-3-methylimidazolium triflate ([PhHEMIM][OTF]). A catalytic amount of lithium chloride (1 mol-%) present in the reaction mixture significantly reduced the reaction time and increased the chemoselectivity of the reduction process.

  • 9.
    Wettergren, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Buitrago, Elina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanistic Investigation on the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones Catalyzed by Pseudo-Dipeptides Ruthenium complexes2009In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 15, no 23, p. 5709-5718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium-powered: A kinetic investigation into the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of non-activated aryl alkyl ketones, catalyzed by N-Boc-protected -amino acid hydroxyamide ruthenium–arene complexes, has revealed that the reactions proceed through an unprecedented bimetallic outer-sphere mechanism. Under optimized conditions, these catalysts provide access to secondary alcohols in high yields and with excellent enantioselectivities (>99 % ee).

    The combination of N-Boc-protected -amino acid hydroxyamides (pseudo-dipeptides) and [{Ru(p-cymene)Cl2}2] resulted in the formation of superior catalysts for the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of non-activated aryl alkyl ketones in propan-2-ol. The overall kinetics of the ATH of acetophenone to form 1-phenylethanol in the presence of ruthenium pseudo-dipeptide catalysts were studied, and the individual rate constants for the processes were determined. Addition of lithium chloride to the reaction mixtures had a strong influence on the rates and selectivities of the processes. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the reduction were determined and the results clearly show that the hydride transfer is rate-determining, whereas no KIEs were detected for the proton transfer. From these observations a novel bimetallic outer-sphere-type mechanism for these ATH process is proposed, in which the bifunctional catalysts mediate the transfer of a hydride and an alkali metal ion between the hydrogen donor and the substrate. Furthermore, the use of a mixture of propan-2-ol and THF (1:1) proved to enhance the rates of the ATH reactions. A series of aryl alkyl ketones were reduced under these conditions in the presence of 0.5 mol % of catalyst, and the corresponding secondary alcohols were formed in high yields and with excellent enantioselectivities (>99 % ee) in short reaction times.

  • 10.
    Wettergren, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Buitrago, Elina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanistic investigations into the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones catalyzed by pseudo-dipeptide ruthenium complexes2009In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 15, no 23, p. 5709-5718Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf