Change search
Refine search result
1 - 33 of 33
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Castaldo Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    A Woman’s Job: Edith Head’s Transformation from School Teacher into Hollywood’s Most Iconic Costume Designer2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Castaldo Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Användningen av digitala arkiv inom humaniora2019In: Humanistiska fakulteten: Nedslag i humaniora, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Castaldo Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Edith Head: From Costume Designer to Fashion Expert2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Costume designer Edith Head has become a symbol of Hollywood costume designers. With more than 50 years of career designing for the big screen, her iconic look has inspired several characters that pay homage to her legacy. Edith Head started her career in 1924 as Howard Greer’s assistant. Without any background in drawing or costume design, Head rapidly ascended to head of the costume department in 1937, when Travis Banton left Paramount and join Howard Greer in his Beverly Hills fashion atelier. Scholars have presented her career as a linear story of costume design success, focusing mostly on her time at Paramount Pictures and basing arguments onHead’s own media declarations. However, Head’s media appearances and the widespread popularity as a public persona demonstrate that a large part of her work for the studio rested on being a promoter by exploiting her role as a mediator of fashion discourses for female audiences. Head used the looks of the stars to educate women into finding “their type” and showed them how to adapt screen looks for real-life situations. This paper looks at the role of Edith Head as a cultural translator of fashion, guiding American woman into the meaning of style and femininity in post-war America, by focusing on Head’s radio segments, books, and her work as the Academy Awards fashion consultant. The presentation will demonstrate that Head was a key PR figure for the studio and that this strategy also worked on her favor to perpetuate her position in the job market after the demise of the studio system.

  • 4.
    Castaldo Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Exploring the Intersections of Fashion, Film, and Media2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the turn of the twentieth century, the film industry has played a key role in the promotion and representation of fashion. Likewise, fashion’s mediated character through newsreels, television, newspapers, magazines, photography, and even paintings has facilitated the study of costume and dress history. Film scholars have dedicated efforts to the study of fashion, film, and media, focusing mostly but not exclusively on matters of representation through costume design. Significant contributions from scholars like Jane Gaines, Stella Bruzzi, Tamar Jeffers McDonald, and Adrienne Munich among others have paved the way for an interdisciplinary approach to study fashion from a film and media perspective and shaped a multitude of intercultural links between cinema and other media practices. Far from being an exhausted topic, however, the intersections between the fashion and film industries offer a vast potential that is increasingly becoming of interest to early career scholars around the globe. This special issue seeks to widen the existing research network, presenting articles from postgraduate students and early career researchers from different background with a dedicated interest in researching the intersections between fashion, film, and media. These papers provide an overview of the ways in which these areas of study overlap and intertwine.

  • 5.
    Castaldo Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Hollywood In and Out: A Look into the Academy Awards Ceremony's Transition from Private Banquet to Public Spectacle2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Academy Awards ceremony is the foremost reference to Hollywood gatherings. Since its inception, in 1929, the event has shifted format and itinerated in different locations, frequently outside the confinements of Hollywood city. Several of these changes of venue bare a close relation with political decisions, the events’ increasing popularity, and the technological developments that turned the ceremony into a media event. Key to this mediatization of the Oscars is how the ceremony transformed from a private banquet into a public spectacle. This paper looks into such a transition from a private gathering into a public spectacle and the consequent spatial reconfigurations.

    It is necessary to problematize the conceptualization of Hollywood, understanding it as a fluid idea that works both as a geographical space and as well as a community striving for prestige. This paper engages with Michel Foucault’s concept of heterotopia to help elucidate how the U.S. film industry’s appropriation of the notion of Hollywood allowed it to function as an abstract conception for the mediascape instead of anchoring the event to a geographical area. The first Oscars ceremony took place at the Roosevelt Hotel, in Hollywood. By 1930, the Academy Awards moved outside Hollywood, at the Ambassador Hotel’s Cocoanut Grove in Los Angeles. A big leap from private gatherings to public spectacle took place in 1944 when the ceremony changed the format and moved into Grauman’s Chinese Theatre. Historical discourses around the event attribute such shift to a search for austerity during wartime. I argue that rather than lowering the event's profile as a gesture of austerity, the move into movie venues turned the ceremony into a grandiose public spectacle that function as the steppingstone for the media event we see today. By 1947, the Oscars had already moved out of Hollywood. Despite the restless migratory patterns that took the ceremony continued carrying its aura as the quintessential spectacle “live from Hollywood.” It was not until the construction of the Kodak Theatre was completed, in 2002, that the ceremony established in Hollywood for good. 

    This presentation provides a historical overview of the Academy Awards Ceremony from a spatial perspective by looking at the venues in which it was organized, their infrastructure, and the arrangements required as a consequence of technological media shifts and the events’ increasing popularity. 

  • 6.
    Castaldo Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Introduction: Exploring the Intersection of Fashion, Film, and Media2018In: Networking Knowledge: Journal of the MeCCSA Postgraduate Network, ISSN 1755-9944, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue belongs to a series of activities under the umbrella denomination “Studying and Exploring the Intersections of Fashion, Film, and Media Studies,” created in 2014 by film scholar Anne Bachmann and I. Our goal was to promote an interdisciplinary perspective to the study of fashion, film, and media. This venture was launched with two activities at the 2015 edition of the annual conference of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies, in Montreal. The first activity consisted of a panel featuring the on-going projects of four Ph.D. students working with these combined fields.[1]  The second activity consisted of a workshop, in which presentations opened to discussions addressing how the use of archival material and film fan magazines, combined with film studies’ methodological approach to history, could benefit fashion research.[2] This workshop expanded into a Symposium at Stockholm University featuring established scholars who pioneered research in these fields of studies combined. This special issue of Networking Knowledge seeks to include early career researchers in such conversation, broadening the network of scholars and the combined field of expertise. Since its inception, a historical approach has been encouraged by the founders of this project. Yet, the semiotic roots used for textual analysis of costume design shall not be overlooked. In this sense, this special issue intends to present a panorama of the heterogeneous nature of studies in these interconnected fields.

  • 7.
    Castaldo Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Pre-Code Hollywood: The Final Sparks of the Insubordinate Screen2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Castaldo Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    The most famous costume designer: constructing Edith Head’s narrative from school teacher to Hollywood stardust2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Castaldo Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    The “Paco Rabanne Myth”: How Archival Research Can Help Us Deconstruct Celebrity Discourses2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Castaldo Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    When Shallowness Enables Depth: The Oscars as a Scenario for Socio-Political Protest2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    A quién le importan los mejores vestidos? La lista infame de Mr. Blackwell y el lema toda prensa es buena prensa2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Barbarella: 50 Years of Space Age2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Barbarella's wardrobe: Exploring Jacques Fonteray’s intergalactic runway2016In: Film Fashion and Consumption, ISSN 2044-2823, E-ISSN 2044-2831, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 185-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jane Fonda’s intergalactic adventure, Barbarella (Dino De Laurentiis Cinematografica, 1968), looms large in popular culture despite its mild reception in 1968. Disguised under its sartorial splendor, the film’s narrative clearly negotiates social anxieties of the late ‘60s. Similarly, the production design of the film incorporates contemporary elements from art, architecture and fashion. Paco Rabanne is frequently credited as the creator of Fonda’s onscreen parade of highly stylized costumes. Yet, the Spanish designer only created one of her eight outfits. The paper addresses this misconception by exploring how the film’s mise-en-scène captured the contemporary design trends beyond Rabanne’s participation, perpetuating Barbarella as a symbol of its own times.

  • 14.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Comunicación responsable de la violencia de género2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Cuerpos de Emulación Pecuniaria: Estrellas de Hollywood como elemento homogeneizador de la femineidad e identidad nacional en los Estados Unidos2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [es]

    El fin del siglo XIX acarreó cambios sustanciales para las mujeres en los Estados Unidos. El cambio de paradigma que permitió a hombres y mujeres compartir la esfera pública, el creciente rol de la mujer en el ámbito laboral, el surgimiento del culto a la “personalidad,” y la consolidación de la industria del cine tuvieron incidencia directa en la reconfiguración de la femineidad y la búsqueda de una identidad nacional entre las jóvenes inmigrantes de la clase trabajadora de los Estados Unidos. Lentamente, las estrellas de cine ganaron prestigio como símbolos de belleza y movilidad social para miles de jóvenes mujeres gracias a la circulación de imágenes en suplementos dominicales y revistas especializadas en cine. En breve, la industria del cine Estadounidense comenzó a replicar los formatos de revistas como Photoplay y Motion Picture Magazine para los países de habla hispana, propagando su hegemonía a lo largo y a lo ancho del continente. Parte fundamental del proceso de identificación está ligado al creciente uso de estrellas de cine en publicidades de productos de belleza y moda. La agencia de publicidad J. W. Thompson fue el eje fundamental de dicha dinámica. La empresa contaba con un grupo de mujeres ejecutivas a cargo de las cuentas correspondientes as productos de belleza. Estas mujeres, en su mayoría pertenecientes al movimiento sufragista de los Estados Unidos, tuvieron un rol fundamental en el desarrollo de productos y campañas orientadas al público femenino. La presentación dará un paneo histórico sobre la transición de estos cuerpos de emulación pecuniaria con el fin de comprender el cambio cultural que llevó a las estrellas de Hollywood de símbolos la “Americanization” de la diáspora en los Estados Unidos a convertirse en sinónimo de glamour y sofisticación para mujeres alrededor del mundo.

  • 16.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Dior Salve a la Reina: Cristina Fernández's Fashionable Pleasures and her Constant War Against the Media2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is an austerity discourse compatible with ostentation? And if so, how can the contempt against the middle class be compatible with the veneration of a rich leader? Why is Cristina Fernandez’s indulgent luxury forgiven while the working middle class is stigmatized as privileged oligarchs? How does this relate to the controversial and iconic figure of Eva Duarte de Perón? The paper describes the dichotomy between Cristina Fernandez’s national populist discourse and her personal preference for high-end brands that had turned her into a fashion icon, capturing the attention of fashion bloggers, international newspapers and even Vogue. Theoretically framed by O’Donell’s conceptualization of Delegative Democracies, the presentation will explore how disguised under a veneer of socialism—and pursuing Chavez’s model for Venezuela—Argentina's president has mobilized a campaign to control the local Media that lead to confrontation with those journalists who persistently try to unmask her luxurious lifestyle, shopping preferences, and unclear finances. This contradiction between luxury and utterance is not new to the Argentine masses. The iconic figure of Evita was often under attack accused of enjoying the same lifestyle as those she criticized. The parallelism between these two figures draws an interesting conclusion about the role of Media, performance, nostalgia, and fandom in Latin-American politics. *Play on words exchanging Dios (God) for Dior as in Dior (God) Save the Queen.

  • 17.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Fearless Fashion: Rudi Gernreich2019In: Fashion Theory: The Journal of Dress, Body and Culture, ISSN 1362-704X, E-ISSN 1751-7419Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    From Scarcity to Abundance: How Digitized Material Demands Academic Cooperation2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent proliferation of free-access digital archives opened a new era of research in which costs decrease as information flourishes. This abundance represents countless possibilities, but as material becomes more vast and accessible, the anxieties for publishing increase, in a profession that already dealt with a haunting “race against time” to present results. In addition, the challenge of accessing larger bulks of material builds up pressure, calling for more precision in arguments, as results derive from a larger amount of primary sources. The use of fan magazines as sources for academic research is vast in film and media studies, but its potential across newer fields—such as fashion and celebrity studies—is increasingly bringing more players into the game. 

    Moving forward with these changes without analyzing the extent of their impact would be awry. In this landscape, Carlo Ginzburg’s Microhistory and Walter Benjamin’s problematization of historical debris need to be revisited, not in metatheoretical manner, but rather in a search for answers in this new reconfiguration. My argument for this workshop is that abundance and time constrains enable a reformulation of research questions and the emergence of a more collaborative research environment; more material also requires more contextual knowledge, making the bulk of work increase exponentially. In addition, I call to not lose from sight that abundance does not imply completion, calling for awareness of the—always-tempting—illusion of historical completion.

    This presentation explores the potentials and anxieties brought by the abundance and accessibility of digital archives, as it also intends to offer an overview of a potential reconfiguration of academic work enabled by these new research platforms. As with every workshop, I bring more questions that answer to open up for debate. How can we get pass the anxiety of abundance? Do we need to “zoom in” deeper when conducting research in this new landscape? How do research networks reconfigure as more material becomes electronically available? Is this new availability of material opening up for historical revisionisms? How do we incorporate these tools in the classroom?

  • 19.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Hollywood, moda y la alfombra roja: El surgimiento del consultor de moda en los Oscars2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Jaws: Creating the Myth of the Man-Eating Machine2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Jaws: Creating the Myth of the Man-Eating Machine2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Jaws(Universal Studios, 1975) set a new standard for Hollywood film production byintroducing the concept of “summer blockbuster,” for a film that changed the way inwhich people thought about sharks. 37 years after the release of the movie, the idea of sharks as ferocious man-hunters still looms large in public opinion. Thisconceptualization of sharks as ruthless killers is mythical rather than factual, and thisresearch tracks the mechanisms that propelled the idea deep into popular culture.The dissertation addresses the problematics of media constructions through a casestudy of the movie Jawsdeparting from its production process, and by applyingBarbara Klinger’s interpretation of “epiphenomena.” The thesis studies how cinematravels into popular culture, by following the traces of the movie into other media, andits dialogue with the surrounding texts generated by PR, marketing andmerchandising; simultaneously, the thesis seek to demonstrate the connection between the movie as mythmaker and the stigmatized portrayal of sharks.

  • 22.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Lo squalo, le strategie di marketing della Universal e la construzione della "Jawsmania"2015In: Cinergie, ISSN 2280-9481, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jaws (Steven Spielberg, 1975) set a new standard for Hollywood film production by introducing the concept of “summer blockbuster,” but it also changed the way in which people thought about sharks. Almost 40 years after the release of the movie, the idea of sharks as ferocious man-hunters still underpins public opinion. This conceptualization of sharks as ruthless killers is mythical rather than factual, and in this presentation I intend to track the mechanisms that rooted the idea deep into popular culture. My research addresses the problematic of media constructions through a case study of the movie Jaws by looking into the production process, and applying Barbara Klinger’s interpretation of Epiphenomena (1989). Through intensive archival work, the paper studies how cinema travels into popular culture, by following the traces of the movie into other media, and the surrounding texts linked to marketing and merchandising; underlining its position as an integral part in the construction of myths, while tying to prove the connection between the movie and the stigmatized portrayal of sharks.

  • 23.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    No Oscar for The Oscar?: Behind Hollywood's Walk of Greed2014In: Networking Knowledge, ISSN 1755-9944, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1966 the popular interest in the Academy Awards propelled Paramount Pictures to produce The Oscar (Embassy Pictures-Paramount Pictures, 1966), a film based on the homonymous novel by Richard Sale. The Oscar tells the story of an unscrupulous actor willing to do anything in his power to obtain the golden statuette, regardless of whom he has to take down along the way. Building up on fantasies of social mobility, we see the protagonist (Frankie) display his vanity, arrogance and greed to create a less than likeable character whose only hope to put his career back on track lies in obtaining the precious statuette. 

    The movie intends to be a sneak peek behind the scenes of the biggest award ceremony, but also behind the lifestyle of the Hollywood elites, their glory and their misery as part of the Hollywood disposal machinery. Despite not being financed or officially supported by the Academy, the film intertwines elements of fiction and reality by using real footage of the event, and featuring several contemporary representatives of the movie industry such as Edith Head, Hedda Hopper, Frank and Nancy Sinatra, playing cameo roles, adding up to the inter-textual capacities of the story. Head’s participation was particularly exploited for the promotion of the film, taking advantage of her position at Paramount, her status as a multiple winner, and her role as a fashion consultant for the Academy Awards. This paper is an analytical account of the film’s production process. Through a close look to its publicity, it will unravel how the studios relied on the awards, and all possible inter-textual capacities to promote the film, despite the Academy’s distancing from the project. 

  • 24.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies. Stockholm University.
    Oscar Night in Hollywood: Fashioning the Red-Carpet from the Roosevelt Hotel to International Media2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the red-carpet phenomenon from a historical perspective, seeking to understand how the Academy Awards’ red-carpet became the most prominent fashion show in media culture. The connections between Hollywood and the fashion industry predate the inception of the ceremony, and so does the role of Hollywood actresses as trendsetters. However, this pseudo-event epitomizes precisely this liaison. This research focuses on several historical constellations to account for the influence of media shifts, the public relations dynamics of the event, the changes in the fashion and film industries, and the role of key players in the dissemination of fashion discourses in relation to Hollywood. By delving into archival sources, and tracing discourses of fashion, stardom, and celebrity surrounding Hollywood and the Oscars, this dissertation shows how the red-carpet gained such status, functioning today as a marquee for celebrity endorsement of high-end fashion brands.

    Chapter 1 provides a historical overview of the event, identifying key moments in the configuration of the Oscars and its red-carpet event. Chapter 2 discusses the role of gatekeepers as mediators of cultural capital. This contextualizes the connections between Hollywood and fashion journalism, and the emergence and development of the best- and worst- dressed lists in the U.S. Chapter 3 analyzes the role of advertising and endorsement practices in the circulation of ideas that set Hollywood personalities as influencers. In addition, the legal aspects of testimonials, the notion of “red-carpet treatment” in association with the emergence of lifestyle advertising, and the coronation of “Oscar” as a celebrity in its own right are discussed. Chapter 4 focuses on the career of Edith Head, looking into her popular appeal as Hollywood’s foremost “fashion expert.” Chapter 5 explores the dynamics of fashion at the Academy Awards, Head’s crucial role as the Academy Awards’ Fashion Consultant, and what may be considered the first Academy Awards’ fashion pre-show. Chapter 6 is pivoted on the role of television networks and sponsors in the inception of the Oscarcast, and the public relations dynamics that set fashion at the forefront by branding this media event as an international fashion show free-for-all. The dissertation closes with a case study of the film The Oscar (Embassy Films, 1966), which amalgamates the kaleidoscope of ideas explored in the previous six chapters.

    This transdisciplinary study concludes that WWII marked a turning point in the history of the Academy Awards. The postwar culture was characterized by the power-shift towards television, the emergence of celebrity culture, the expansion of consumer culture, the reactivation of transatlantic trade, the growth of fashion journalism, and an increasing circulation of national and international designer names in the media. In this context, promotional practices that put Hollywood designers and stars at the forefront turned into an optimal platform for the proliferation of fashion discourses around the Oscars. This has been momentous for the conceptualization of the Oscarcast as a fashion show since its inception in 1953. 

  • 25.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Oscar Night in Hollywood: the Emergence of the Academy Awards' Fashion Pre-Show2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    The Case of Lux Flakes: The Costume Designers as Fashion Experts and Endorsers during the Studio Era2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    The Future in the Past: Exploring Barbarella’s Intergalactic Catwalk2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its controversial reception in 1968, Barbarella (Dino De Laurentiis Cinematografica, 1968) looms large in popular culture. Disguised under its sartorial splendor, the film’s narrative clearly negotiates social anxieties of the late ‘60s. Similarly, its production design incorporates contemporary elements present in art, architecture and fashion that stand today as a symbol of the space age design. Arguably, these elements of style, along with its camp representation of the future, played a key role in catapulting the film to its cult status. Spanish designer Paco Rabanne is frequently credited for the creation of Jane Fonda’s onscreen parade of highly stylized costumes. Moreover, fashion magazines oftentimes associate the overall aesthetic of his brand to his past contrubution in the film, which has served for framing runway shows and inspiring collections to date. However, the man responsible for creating fashion for Roger Vadim's vision of the year 40,000 was French costume designer Jacques Fonteray. The case of Paco Rabanne and Barbarella serves as an interesting example of how popular culture appropriates history, contributing to the construction of myths through media. Grounded on archival research, this article explores the role of Jacques Fonteray in the overall creation of the Jane Fonda's costumes, debunking popular misconception regarding Paco Rabanne’s influence on the film’s overall aesthetics.

  • 28.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Who Cares About the Best Dressed?: Mr. Blackwell’s Infamous List and the Art of Self-Branding2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before Joan Rivers’s Fashion Police (E! Entertainment, 2002- ), there was a man who made a reputation in Hollywood for his outspoken criticism of celebrity style. Provocative, overopinionated, controversial, admired, hated and feared; self proclaimed fashion’s advocate Richard Blackwell achieved worldwide recognition after launching his annual 10 Worst Dresed List in 1960. His outrageous comments against celebrities catapulted him to stardom, and turned him into a popular culture icon. Yet, the articulation of his list was a clear act of Winchellism rather than a sincere call for style. But, how much did Blackwell know about fashion? How did he become an authority on how American women should dress and behave? Overlooked by the fashion industry, Mr. Blackwell achieved a status among popular audiences that his more knowledgable detractors could not outshine. This paper looks at historical reception of Mr. Blackwell as a victimizer, but also a victim of celebrity culture. A master of performance and self branding rather than a fashion conoceur. A man seeking fame and recognition, who cleverly found a nische in the enterteinment industry through his controversial statements about stars, style and fashion, propelling a skyrocketing career in Hollywood he so longed for, and becoming a symbol for “all publicity is good publicity.”

  • 29.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Who Cares About the Best-Dressed?: Mr. Blackwell's Infamous List and the Art of Self-Branding2014In: : Mr. Blackwell's Infamous List and the Art of Self-Branding, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Before Joan Rivers’s Fashion Police (E! Entertainment, 2002- ), there was a man who made a reputation in Hollywood for his outspoken criticism of celebrity style. Provocative, overopinionated, controversial, admired, hated and feared; self proclaimed fashion’s advocate Richard Blackwell achieved worldwide recognition after launching his annual 10 Worst Dresed List in 1960. His outrageous comments against celebrities catapulted him to stardom, and turned him into a popular culture icon. Yet, the articulation of his list was a clear act of Winchellism rather than a sincere call for style. But, how much did Blackwell know about fashion? How did he become an authority on how American women should dress and behave? Overlooked by the fashion industry, Mr. Blackwell achieved a status among popular audiences that his more knowledgable detractors could not outshine. This paper looks at historical reception of Mr. Blackwell as a victimizer, but also a victim of celebrity culture. A master of performance and self branding rather than a fashion conoceur. A man seeking fame and recognition, who cleverly found a nische in the enterteinment industry through his controversial statements about stars, style and fashion, propelling a skyrocketing career in Hollywood he so longed for, and becoming a symbol for “all publicity is good publicity.”

  • 30.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Faggella, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Editorial Foreword2019In: Film Fashion and Consumption, ISSN 2044-2823, E-ISSN 2044-2831, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Faggella, ChiaraStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Interdisciplinary approaches to the study of moving images and fashion2019Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genesis of this special issue of Film, Fashion and Consumption can be traced back to 2015 when, as Ph.D. students interested in the combined study of fashion and film, we took the ambitious project of organizing a one-day symposium at the former Centre for Fashion Studies (IMS), Stockholm University. The enthusiastic response from scholars who participated promoted compelling and thought-provoking discussions in the full day of panels that ensued. The symposium, under the title Exploring the Intersections of Fashion and Film Studies, was held on 6 November 2015 at Filmhuset in Stockholm. It brought together archivists, film, fashion and media scholars from leading institutions, coming from different backgrounds but sharing this dedicated interest. The aim of the symposium was to discuss and reflect about the complex manner in which our areas of study overlap and intertwine, and the potential to produce scholarly work. In addition, the open nature of the event gave film, fashion and media students of all levels an opportunity to learn from, and interact with, some of the most prominent scholars in these areas of study.

  • 32.
    Castaldo Lundén, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Jeffers McDonald, Tamar
    Romero, Jenny
    Because Fashion Matters: Studying the Intersections of Fashion, Film and Media2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing interest in the study of fashion has opened up to the emergence of Fashion Studies as an independent field, with programs in several universities around the globe. However, the study of fashion should not be regarded as a new phenomenon. For decades, scholars from varied disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences have immersed themselves in the study of fashion, particularly in relation to film and media. Since the early days of cinema, the film industry played a key role in the promotion and representation of fashion. Likewise, its mediated character through newsreels, television, newspapers, magazines, photography and even paintings has facilitated the study of costume and dress history. Film scholars like Jane Gaines, Stella Bruzzi, and Pamela Church Gibson—among others—have vastly contributed to the interdisciplinary study of these intersections. Furthermore, in order to explore the specificities of these areas, Church Gibson launched the journal Fashion Film and Consumption, though the publishing house Intellect Books in 2011.

    In this contemporary setting, a pertinent and necessary topic to explore is the demands on interdisciplinary approaches, both from the side of Fashion Studies scholars with a purist point of view, and from their counterpoints in Film and Media more likely to envelop fashion in visual culture as a whole.

    As discussions regarding delimitations and canons take place behind close doors in fashion programsthe need to open up such debate to Film and Media scholars is vital to the future of a field that has seen a great part of its development through these neighboring contributions. 

    The workshop will explore the study of Film, Media and Fashion in coexistence with the emergence of Fashion Studies as an independent field, focusing on questions of methodology, theory and practice through the experience of different film and media scholars working with fashion and film. Before opening up the floor for discussion, a brief set of presentations will serve as a framework to address the debate, engaging the audience in reflections surrounding the following questions: 

     

    • What are the challenges and advantages of film and media scholars engaging in fashion research? 
    • Is Fashion Studies an exclusive realm for fashion scholars? 
    • Is there one singular way to study and teach fashion independently from its neighboring disciplines? 
    • What can different approaches used in Film and Media Studies contribute to the study of fashion? 
    • To what extent can Fashion Studies exist as a totally independent field, avoiding connections with Film and Media? 
  • 33.
    Lunden, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Oscar Night in Hollywood: Edith Head and the Emergence of the Academy Awards Fashion Pres-Show2015Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 33 of 33
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf