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  • 1.
    Halldén, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    le Grand, EliasStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.Hellgren, ZeniaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ethnicity and Social Divisions: Contemporary Research in Sociology2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The anthology "Ethnicity and Social Divisions: Contemporary Research in Sociology" is a collection of studies presented at the annual Aage Sorensen Memorial Conferences in 2006 and 2007. The volume reflects a number of important tendencies in contemporary social research: the increasing interest in questions that concern ethnicity and immigration on the one hand, the remaining centrality of social stratification and class analysis on the other hand, and the intersection between these fields. Eight young sociologists, all PhD Candidates at the universities of Harvard, Oxford or Stockholm at the time they wrote their contributions, participate in this volume. Representing a new generation of social scientists, they have conducted empirical research on social inequality related to class and ethnicity from different perspectives.

  • 2.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Book review: Fashion-ology: an Introduction to Fashion Studies.2006In: Journal of Consumer Culture, ISSN 1469-5405, E-ISSN 1741-2900, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 408-410Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Class, community and belonging in a 'Chav Town'2014In: Mobilities and neighbourhood belonging in  cities and suburbs / [ed] Paul Watt, Peer Smets, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, p. 164-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Class, Place and Identity in a Satellite Town2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The central aim of this study is to examine processes of identity formation among white, working-class youths in a marginalized area located on the outskirts of South London. It is primarily based on long-term ethnographic fieldwork but also on analyses of web sites, newspapers and popular culture. The study contributes to research on ‘chavs’, and on youth (sub)cultures and social class.

    Identity is conceived as constructed through the dialectical interplay between ‘external’ processes of social categorization and ‘internal’ processes of identification and boundary work. The context of the study is the recent moral panic in Britain over ‘chavs’. In public discourse, the term chav emerged as a way of pathologizing white working-class youths adopting specific visual markers of taste. The study shows that most respondents, and the area in general, were positioned in the stigmatizing discourse on chavs, and the spaces and places that they are associated with. When interpreting the meaning of chav, the respondents drew strong boundaries against the term, and used it to categorize others. In contrast to earlier research, the notion of chav is not related to a subcultural style adopted by socially excluded groups of youths, but primarily a form of categorization serving to pathologize important aspects of the working-class culture in the area.

    The findings support the contention that spatiality plays an essential role in the formation of classed identities. In light of the stigmatizing perceptions of the area, the study explores the often ambiguous ways in which the respondents negotiated their sense of belonging, community and safety. Moreover, in relation to taste and masculinity, the study demonstrates how the construction and performance of classed identifications and distinctions, and thus symbolic class hierarchies, are related to the spatial context.

  • 5.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Conceptualising Social Types and Figures: From Social Forms to Classificatory Struggles2019In: Cultural Sociology, ISSN 1749-9755, E-ISSN 1749-9763, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 411-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis of social types, such as the stranger, the marginal man and the folk devil, has a long, significant history in sociology and related fields. Although the social type concept currently enjoys a rather marginal status, in recent years the related concept of figure has been increasingly deployed in research. This article contends that Bourdieu’s work on classification and social differentiation can offer fruitful tools for a renewed focus on types and figures. To this end, it advocates a critical approach to the study of social types and figures in which they are conceived as social identities tied to classificatory struggles over meaning, value, recognition and resources between differentially positioned actors. The article also attempts to clarify the distinction between types and figures and discuss how they can be applied in research. The main arguments of the article are developed through a critical reading of key contributions to research on social types and figures as well as through the discussion of two empirical studies.

  • 6.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Linking Moralisation and Class Identity: The Role of Ressentiment and Respectability in the Social Reaction to 'Chavs'2015In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to link two fields of research which have come to form separate lines of inquiry: the sociology of moralisation and studies on class identity. Expanding on recent papers by Young (2009, 2011) and others, the paper argues that the concepts of ressentiment and respectability can be used to connect moralisation processes and the formation of class identities. This is explored through a case study of the social reaction in Britain to white working-class youths labelled 'chavs'. It is demonstrated that chavs are constructed through moralising discourses and practices, which have some elements of a moral panic. Moreover, moralisation is performative in constructing class identities: chavs have been cast as a 'non-respectable' white working-class 'folk devil' against whom 'respectable' middle-class and working-class people distinguish and identify themselves as morally righteous. Moralising social reactions are here to an important extent triggered by feelings of ressentiment. This is a dialectical process where respectability and ressentiment are tied, not only to the social control of certain non-respectable working-class others, but also to the moral self-governance of the moralisers.

  • 7.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Moralising discourse and the dialectical formation of class identities2016In: Revisiting Moral Panics / [ed] Viviene E Cree, Viviene E. Cree, Gary Clapton, Mark Smith, Policy Press, 2016, p. 159-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the volatile social reaction to chavs. The term has become widely used to denigrate white working-class youths appropriating certain markers of taste. It is demonstrated that the chav is constructed through moralising discourses and practices, which have elements of a moral panic. Three elements characterising moralisation processes are identified: moral order, social control and ethical self-formation. Moreover, it is shown that the moralisation of chavs serves to construct class identities: chavs have been cast as a ‘non-respectable’, white working-class ‘folk devil’ against whom middle-class and ‘respectable’ working-class people distinguish and identify themselves as morally righteous.

  • 8.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Renewing class theory?: Exploitation, individualization and culture2008In: Thinking with Beverley Skeggs / [ed] Annika Olsson, Stockholm: Centre for Gender Studies, Stockholm University , 2008, p. 21-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Representing the middle-class ‘hipster’: Emerging modes of distinction, generational oppositions and gentrification2018In: European Journal of Cultural Studies, ISSN 1367-5494, E-ISSN 1460-3551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how representations of the ‘hipster’ in newspapers and onblogs are bound up with processes of class distinction in contemporary Britain. Theanalysis demonstrates that the hipster is a contested middle-class social type who isthe object of both denigration and prestige. The hipster is typically represented as ayoung person associated with the middle-class fraction of the cultural intermediarieswho is engaged in a particular set of reflexive and trendy consumption practices,often performed in gentrified urban spaces and linked to the creative industries.The article suggests that the disputed status of ‘hipster cool’ is indicative of shiftingclass distinctions in cultural taste and classificatory struggles within the middleclass between generational groupings that involve questions of authenticity. Suchcontestations are reflected by the increasing legitimacy of emerging forms ofcultural capital rooted in popular culture and embraced by young people, and thewaning symbolic power of traditional highbrow culture associated with an oldergeneration of middle-class people. It is also argued that the classificatory strugglesover hipster tastes and lifestyles have a spatial dimension as bound up with thepublic controversies and social anxieties linked to gentrification in neoliberal Britain.

  • 10.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Rethinking Neo-Tribes: Ritual, Social Differentiation and Symbolic Boundaries in 'Alternative' Food Practice2018In: Neo-Tribes: Consumption, Leisure and Tourism / [ed] Anne Hardy, Andy Bennett, Brady Robards, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 17-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critiquing neo-tribal research for discounting the role of social differentiation and overstating the inclusive and non-hierarchical aspects of neo-tribal communality, this chapter attempts to extend the neo-tribe concept to incorporate processes of exclusion, hierarchy and symbolic boundary formation as well as acknowledge the continuing influence of class relations. To this end, it firstly draws on Durkheim’s, Goffman’s and Collins’ writings on rituals and collective effervescence, to discuss how neo-tribal gatherings have a hierarchical and excluding character. Secondly, the paper discusses recent research influenced by Bourdieu and studies on ‘alternative’ food consumption to conceptualise how neo-tribal formations can be connected to class-based forms of cultural hierarchy.

  • 11.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The 'Chav' as Folk Devil2013In: Moral Panics in the Contemporary World / [ed] Julian Petley, Chas Critcher, Jason Hughes, Amanda Rohloff, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    The Figure of the ‘Chav’ in a London Satellite Town2015In: Hopeless Youth! / [ed] Francisco Martínez, Pille Runnel, Tartu: Estonian National Museum , 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Writing the Ethnographic Self in Research on Marginalised Youths and Masculinity2014In: Reflexivity in criminological research: experiences with the powerful and the powerless / [ed] Karen Lumsden, Aaron Winter, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, p. 115-124Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Youth, Class and Everyday Struggles2020In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    le Grand, Elias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hellgren, Zenia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Halldén, Karin
    The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Introduction: Social Stratification in Multiethnic Societies: Class and Ethnicity2008In: Ethnicity and Social Divisions: Contemporary Research in Sociology, Cambridge Scholars Publishing. Newcastle upon Tyne , 2008, p. 270-Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 15 of 15
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