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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bardel, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Bartning, Inge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. English department, Stockholm.
    Fant, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Forsberg Lundell, Fanny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Föremålet för inlärning [kap. 3]2014In: avancerad andraspråksanvändning: slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Inge Bartning, Lars Fant, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag , 2014, no 2, p. 20-46, article id M2005-0459Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bardel, Camilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Erman, BrittStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Language and Gender from Linguistic and Textual Perspectives2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Cognitive processes as evidence of the idiom principle2007In: International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 25-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Formulaic language from a learner perspective: What the learner needs to know2009In: Formulaic language: Acquisition, loss, psychological reality, and functional explanations. Vol. 2 / [ed] Roberta Corrigan, Edith A. Moravcsik, Hamid Quali, Kathleen, M. Wheatley, Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009, p. 27-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formulaic language in focus in the present paper is collocations. The ‘intrinsic’ as opposed to ‘extrinsic’ features of collocations related to Frame Semantics and Lexical Functions are proposed to best reflect their unit-hood status. The paper primarily discusses the lexical status and identification of collocations from different theoretical frameworks, and also reports on a study examining the collocations in English essays written by native and non-native writers. The results show that the non-native group (English students at Stockholm University) have a relatively good command of collocations, but also that that their collocational range is reduced and that non-target collocations do occur. The paper concludes with a review of the implications for foreign language teaching more generally. 

  • 5.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Frame-induced collocations in the writings of native speakers and firs-term university students of English2009In: Corpora and Discourse - and Stuff: Papers in honour of Karin Aijmer / [ed] Rhonwen Bowen, Mats Mobärg, Sölve Ohlander, Gothenburg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis , 2009, p. 23-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Jackpot for the Humanities at Stockholm University.2007Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Phraseological build-up in the writings of deaf and hearing first term students of English2004In: Second Language Acquisition and Usage, Almquist & Wiksell International, Stockholm , 2004, p. 31-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pragmatic markers revisited with a focus on 'you know' in adult and adolescent talk2001In: Journal of Pragmatics, Vol. 33, p. 1337-1359Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University. English department, Stockholm.
    Språkets fraseologi en svår nöt att knäcka2008In: Tvärsnitt, ISSN 0348-7997, Vol. 3, no 08, p. 38-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    There is no such thing as a free combination: a usage- based study of specific construals in adverb- adjective combinations2014In: English Language and Linguistics, ISSN 1360-6743, E-ISSN 1469-4379, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 109-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study is aimed at revealing collocational adverb-adjective patterns in the British National Corpus (BNC). The adverbs selected for the study include the maximizers absolutely, completely, entirely, fully, perfectly, totally, utterly, wholly. The study involves searches on both the selected adverbs and the adjectives they modify in a bi-directional fashion. It is claimed that only a cognitive and usage-based approach in terms of underlying conceptual structures can provide an accurate description of collocational patterns. The results show that a large proportion of the adjectives have strong bonds with particular maximizers. This is explained through the basic conceptual structure of Boundedness/Scalarity, i.e. the degree to which the adjective lends itself to a bounded or a scalar construal and the adverb is biased towards a totality construal (which is the kind of construal to be expected from maximizers). The results support the hypothesis that a substantial part of the adverb-adjective combinations investigated are (semi)-prefabricated units, presumably easily accessed by native speakers because the combinations are the result of specific construals and their members have close associative and conceptual links in the mental lexicon.

  • 11.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Two different methodologies in the identification of recurrent word combinations in L2 writing2015In: Lexical issues in L2 writing / [ed] Päivi Pietilä, Katalin Doró, Renata Pípalová, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, p. 177-205Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, I bring together two studies addressing vocabulary in L2 English writing by Swedish students of English. The first study was based on written material by first-term students, while the second involved material from essays in the third- and fourth-term of English studies. In both studies a matched native group was used as a benchmark. I introduce two different ways of capturing frequent word combinations, one with a focus on collocations, applied in the first study, the other using the “lexical bundle” method (e.g., Biber & Barbieri, 2007; Cortes, 2004), applied in the second study. The results from both studies converge: the native groups exhibit a larger range of both collocations and lexical bundles compared to the non-native groups. The investigations involved quantitative analyses of the word combinations used, as well as a qualitative analysis of the functions they served. Finally, three current methodologies in the identification of multiword structures, including the two methodologies applied in the present study, are compared and evaluated in terms of qualitative aspects, such as size of material and control of task, topic, and discipline. 

  • 12.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Vocabulary in advanced L2 speech2013In: Of butterflies and birds, of dialects and genres: essays in honour of Philip Shaw / [ed] Nils-Lennart Johannesson, Gunnel Melchers, Beyza Björkman, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, p. 93-108Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there are a number of studies of productive vocabulary knowledge focussing on writing, there are considerably fewer on speech. This study seeks to remedy this imbalance by analyzing the vocabulary in spoken production, examining two groups of advanced Swedish speakers of L2 English—one studying English at a Swedish university and the other resident in London—and one group of English native speakers. The three groups performed two tasks, a role play and a simultaneous retelling of the first 14½ minutes of the film Modern Times. To obtain lexical frequency profiles for these groups, Cobb’s software program LexTutor was used. The program distributed the lexical items in the transcriptions of the speech of the three groups over the first thousand (K1) and second thousand (K2) frequency bands, the Academic Wordlist (AWL) and an ‘Off-list’ containing items outside of these three lists. The results showed that in the Role play the lexical profile of the London Swedes was closer to the native speakers compared to the university students. In the Retelling task the two Swedish groups performed similarly, differing significantly from the native group. An additional analysis of the length of repeated words and sequences showed that the London Swedes were closer to the native speakers in both tasks, suggesting a higher degree of automaticity in this group.

  • 13.
    Erman, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Denke, Annika
    Fant, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Forsberg Lundell, Fanny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Nativelike expression in the speech of long-residency L2 users: A study of multiword structures in L2 English, French and Spanish2015In: International Journal of Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0802-6106, E-ISSN 1473-4192, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 160-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nativelike expression in L2 speech is investigated by comparing quantity and distribution of different types of multiword structures (MWSs) in the speech of very advanced L2 speakers with native speakers. Swedish speakers of L2 English, L2 French and L2 Spanish (average LOR in the UK, France and Chile 7–10 years) performing two oral tasks, a role play, and an online retelling task, are compared with matching native speakers, totalling 140,000 words. The L2 groups were nativelike in their use of MWSs as social routines in the role play. Collocations, the dominant category in the retelling task, were underrepresented in all three L2 groups compared to the native groups. Furthermore, the English NNSs were nativelike on more measurements of MWSs than the French and Spanish NNSs.

  • 14.
    Erman, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Falk, JohanMagnusson, GunnarNilsson, Barbro
    Second Language Acquisition and Usage2004Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Erman, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Forsberg Lundell, Fanny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Lewis, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Formulaic language in advanced second language acquisition and use2016In: Advanced proficiency and exceptional ability in second languages / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Boston: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 111-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Erman, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Lewis, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    L2 English Vocabulary in a Long-residency Swedish Group Compared to a Group of English Native Speakers2015In: Cultural Migrants and Optimal Language Acquisition / [ed] Fanny Forsberg Lundell, Inge Bartning, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2015, p. 115-134Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Erman, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Lewis, Margareta
    There is nothing like native speech: A comparison of native and very advanced non-native speech2015In: From clerks to corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today / [ed] Philip Shaw, Britt Erman, Gunnel Melchers, Peter Sundkvist, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2015, p. 349-366Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Erman, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Lewis, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Fant, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Multiword structures in different materials, and with different goals and methodologies2013In: Yearbook of Corpus Linguistics and Pragmatics 2013 / [ed] Jesús Romero Trillo, Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 77-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a well-known fact that multi-word units (MWUs), however pervasive they may be in language use, are difficult to define To date, no definition widely agreed upon exists and, seemingly, an even more complicated endeavor has been to agree upon which subcategories should be included for analysis.

    As Granger & Pacquot (2008) point out, largely two methodologies are being used in the study of MWUs. One is the phraseological method, where researchers use linguistic criteria regarding e.g. fixedness and exchangeability, with some intervention of researcher introspection and intersubjectivity.  Within this tradition, mainly idioms (‘grab the bull by its horns’) and collocations (‘draw a conclusion’) have been explored.  The other is the statistical method, where sequences are given the status of MWUs on the basis of purely statistical measures such as log likelihood and MI-score. Frequently, studies using these methods focus on lexical bundles (Biber et al. 2003, Ellis et al. 2008) and also on collocations (Durrant & Schmitt, 2009). In addition, proponents of this latter method tend to use very large corpora of written academic English, whereas the phraseological tradition is used on all sorts of corpora.

    The fact that these different methods thus target different MWUs   considering that a major challenge for linguistics today is to map to what extent language use is composed of ready-made chunks (cf. Erman & Warren 2000, Melčuk 1998). Accordingly, a methodology is called for that can account for MWUs from a more holistic perspective.

    In order to pinpoint methodological issues related to MWU identification in corpora, the present study will analyze data from English and Spanish spoken corpora and confront phraseological/introspective methods with statistical methods. The results show that the different methods arrive at essentially divergent sets of MWUs, and the consequences thereof will be discussed.

  • 19.
    Erman, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Warren, Beatrice
    The idiom principle and the open choice principle2000In: Text, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 29-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Forsberg, Fanny Lundell
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    High level requests: a study of long residency l2 users of English and French and native speakers2012In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 44, no 6-7, p. 756-775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With few exceptions the field of L2 pragmatics has focussed on intermediate and advanced learners and there is little knowledge to date regarding highly proficient, immersed L2 speakers' pragmatic performance. This study concerns L2 speakers having been immersed culturally and professionally for a considerable length of time. Our focus is on-line production of the request sequence by Swedish speakers of L2 English and L2 French having lived and worked approximately 10 years in the L2 country against matched native controls. The task is a role play between an employee and her/his boss implying high demands on the pragmatic knowledge of the participants. Our main results indicate that both groups of L2 users significantly underuse lexical and syntactic downgraders. It is argued in this paper that this underuse is not due to a lack of pragmalinguistic resources, i.e., they use the same types as the native speakers, but is of a socio-pragmatic nature, i.e., they do not downgrade to the same extent. Furthermore, L2 users significantly underuse 'situation-bound' routinized formulaic sequences for expressing the Head act. This result, in contrast, points to a lack of pragmalinguistic resources.

  • 21.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Erman, BrittStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.Melchers, GunnelStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.Peter, SundkvistStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    From clerks to corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why is the Isle of Dogs in the Thames called Isle of Dogs? Did King Canute’s men bring English usage back to Jutland? How can we find out where English speakers suck their breath in to give a short response? And what did the Brontës do about dialect and think about foreign languages? The answers are in this collection of empirical work on English past and present in honour of Nils-Lennart Johannesson, Professor of English Language at Stockholm University. The first five chapters report individual studies forming an overview of current issues in the study of Old and Middle English phonology, lexis and syntax. The next six look at Early Modern and Modern English from a historical point of view, using data from corpora, manuscript archives, and fiction. Two more look at the Old English scholar JRR Tolkien and his work. The remaining chapters discuss aspects of Modern English. Several use corpora to look at English usage in itself or in relation to Swedish, French, or Norwegian. The last three look at grammatical models, the pragmatics of second language use, and modern English semantics.

  • 22.
    Ädel, Annelie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Recurrent word combinations in academic writing by native and non-native speakers of English: a lexical bundles approach2012In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 81-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order for discourse to be considered idiomatic, it needs to exhibit features like fluency and pragmatically appropriate language use. Advances in corpus linguistics make it possible to examine idiomaticity from the perspective of recurrent word combinations. One approach to capture such word combinations is by the automatic retrieval of lexical bundles. We investigated the use of English-language lexical bundles in advanced learner writing by L1 speakers of Swedish and in comparable native-speaker writing, all produced by undergraduate university students in the discipline of linguistics. The material was culled from a new corpus of university student writing, the Stockholm University Student English Corpus (SUSEC), amounting to over one million words. The investigation involved a quantitative analysis of the use of four-word lexical bundles and a qualitative analysis of the functions they serve. The results show that the native speakers have a larger number of types of lexical bundles, which are also more varied, such as unattended ‘this’ bundles, existential ‘there’ bundles, and hedging bundles. Other lexical bundles which were found to be more common and more varied in the native-speaker data involved negations. The findings are shown to be largely similar to those of the phraseological research tradition in SLA.

1 - 22 of 22
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