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  • 1. Doganova, Liliana
    et al.
    Giraudeau, Martin
    Kjellberg, Hans
    Helgesson, Claes-Fredrik
    Lee, Francis
    Mallard, Alexandre
    Mennicken, Andrea
    Muniesa, Fabian
    Sjögren, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Zuiderent-Jerak, Teun
    Five years! Have we not had enough of valuation studies by now?2018In: Valuation Studies, ISSN 2001-5992, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 83-91Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The disparate and heterogeneous body of work that falls under the rubric of “valuation studies” has really taken off in recent years. There are a number of exciting edited volumes and special issues that have been published in the past couple of years (e.g. Berthoin Antal et al. 2015; Cefai et al. 2015; Dussauge et al. 2015; Kornberger et al. 2015). This journal, recently just an idea, is now completing Volume 5 with its tenth issue. Sometimes we hear mumbled irritations about how valuation studies are about everything—and are actually everywhere. “Victory!” we could then answer in triumph, not without noticing how the valuation of valuation studies (and, indeed, of Valuation Studies) goes hand-in-hand with a sense of academic terrain, and the occupation thereof.

  • 2. Hagbjer, Eva
    et al.
    Kraus, Kalle
    Lind, Johnny
    Sjögren, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Role attribution in public sector accountability processes Dynamic and situation-specific accountor and constituent roles2017In: Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management/Emerald, ISSN 1176-6093, E-ISSN 1758-7654, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 367-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore how actors take on and ascribe the role of accountor and constituent in the process of giving and demanding of reasons for organisational conduct.

    Design/methodology/approach - The on-going interactions in supervision meetings between the supplier of outsourced elderly care in Sweden and a local government administration were examined through a longitudinal study.

    Findings - The paper proposes the concept of role attribution to characterise a strategy for handling complexity in public sector accountability processes. This complements previous research, which has described three main strategies for handling competing accountability demands: decoupling, structural differentiation and compromising. Role attribution was found to involve the supplier and purchaser of public services pursuing a specific resolution to an accountability demand by positioning themselves as jointly aligned with certain prospective constituents in the environment. Thus, while inter-organisational relationships can be a source of complexity for accountors, as already documented in prior research, the findings of this paper show ways in which the dynamic and situation-specific accountor and constituent roles can serve as a resource. The two organisations moved back and forth between cooperating to handle accountability demands from actors in the environment and assuming different accountor and constituent roles within their relationship.

    Research limitations/implications - The paper discusses the need to move beyond the taken-forgranted roles of accountor and constituent in analysing outsourced public service relationships. Specifically, the findings suggest that researchers interested in public sector accountability processes would benefit from designing their studies in ways that makes it possible to observe and theorise dynamic and situation-specific accountor and constituent roles.

    Practical implications - The studied supervision meetings served as an arena where on-going accountability issues played out and were mediated through role attribution. Seemingly, there are possibilities to complement formal role descriptions and contracts with systematic processes for addressing on-going operational accountability issues within and beyond individual, formalised accountor-constituent relationships. From a societal perspective, it might be relevant to mandate more systematic procedural structures to support on-going accountability processes, for example, the creation and maintenance of interactive inter-organisational forums which can serve as a mechanism for systematic, yet situation-specific, handling of operational and strategic issues. At an organisational level, this paper shows a need that such forums merit on-going managerial attention and conscious staffing to secure both competence and stability.

    Originality/value - The authors find a dynamic and situation-specific attribution of accountor and constituent roles, in contrast to prior research's routine consideration of these roles as being predetermined by existing relationships of hierarchy and influence.

  • 3. Krohwinkel Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sjögren, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Identifying need through expressions of demand: deciding on public financial intervention within the fields of healthcare and development aid2008In: Public management review, ISSN 1471-9037, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 197-220Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Sjögren, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Deciding subsidy for pharmaceuticals based on ambiguous evidence2008In: Journal of Health Organisation & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 368-383Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Sjögren, Ebba
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Fernler, Karin
    Accounting and professional work in established NPM settings2019In: Accounting Auditing and Accountability Journal, ISSN 0951-3574, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 897-922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The paper problematizes previous research on accountingisation, where the role of accounting in determining the scope of professional work is understood in relation to a professional/economic dichotomy and a model of episodic change. The purpose of this paper is to investigate everyday professional work in established new public management (NPM) settings, and proposes a new conceptual framework to analyze the role of accounting therein. The aim is to enable future investigations into how, when and where a situated “bottom line” emerges, by conceptualizing professional work as a process of calculation.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Qualitative data from case studies of two tertiary level geriatric organizations using observations of 33 employees and four interviews. Data related to patient discharge, and the management of the discharge processes, were analyzed.

    Findings

    Few visible trade-offs between distinctly professional or economic considerations were observed. Rather, the qualification of patients’ status and evaluation of their dischargeability centered on debates over treatment time. Time therefore operated as a situated “bottom line,” to which various other concerns were emergently linked in a process of calculation. Professional practitioners seldom explicitly evoke accounting concepts and technologies, but these were implicated in the ongoing translation of each patient into something temporarily stable, calculable and thus actionable for the professionals involved in their care. The study’s findings have implications for the conceptual understanding of professional work in established NPM settings.

    Research limitations/implications

    Case study research is context-specific and the role of accounting in professional work will vary due to the professional groups and accounting technologies involved.

    Practical implications

    The study’s findings have implications for how to influence professional behavior through interventions in the existing landscape of accounting technologies. The possibility to change behavior through the introduction or removal of individual accounting technologies is questioned.

    Originality/value

    To date, research on the role of accounting in determining the scope of professional work has assumed a professional/economic dichotomy and studied episodic change linked to accounting-oriented reforms. This paper analyses the role of accounting as an on-going process with emergent boundaries between professional and economic considerations.

  • 6.
    Sjögren, Ebba
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Handelshögskolan, Sverige.
    Krohwinkel, Anna
    3 kronor: En jämförelse av hur olika ekonomiska analysmetoder synliggör värde i vården2018Report (Other academic)
  • 7. Svedberg Helgesson, Karin
    et al.
    Sjögren, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    No finish line: How formalization of academic assessment can undermine clarity and increase secrecy2019In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 558-581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses how formalization of promotion criteria and procedures influences clarity and transparency of academic assessment. Based on a longitudinal, structural micro-study of a new tenure track system in a Swedish higher education institution, we find that inequality was reproduced through the choice of explicitly gendered metrics across all areas of assessment (research, teaching and service). We further demonstrate how the formalization of a 'good enough' standard, in addition to a standard of 'excellence', reinforced the scope for interpretational flexibility among assessors. This combination of explicitly gendered metrics and dual standards of performance gave gatekeepers broader discretion in hiding or communicating failure, with gendering effects. Finally, we conclude that the choices made about how to formalize assessment work placed a small group of senior academics firmly behind closed doors, thus ensuring that gatekeepers' discretion and power were entrenched rather than restricted by formalization.

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