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  • 1. Aarskaug Wiik, Kenneth
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Cohabiting and Married Individuals' Relations With Their Partner's Parents2017Inngår i: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 79, nr 4, s. 1111-1124Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Norwegian survey data on partnered individuals ages 18 to 55 (N = 4,061; 31% cohabitors), the current study investigated differences across marital and cohabiting unions regarding the patterns of contact with the parents of the partner. In addition to investigating the frequency of such contact, we assessed the nature of and perceived quality of contacts with the partner's parents. The authors grouped respondents according to whether they had children with their partner and controlled for a range of selection characteristics. Results confirmed that parents with preschool children met their in-laws more frequently than the childless, irrespective of union type. Married respondents as well as cohabitors with preschool children reported better relations with their partner's parents than childless cohabitors. Taken together, the results imply that having small children was more decisive for the relationship with the parents of the partner than getting married, particularly with regard to contact frequency.

  • 2. Aarskaug Wiik, Kenneth
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Gendered expectations: expected consequences of union formation across Europe2019Inngår i: Journal of Family Studies, ISSN 1322-9400, E-ISSN 1839-3543, Vol. 25, nr 2, s. 214-231Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Using comparable survey data from eight European countries this study investigated expected consequences of forming a co-residential relationship among non-partnered individuals aged 22-35 (N = 8443). Results showed that respondents expected improvements in their financial situation when moving in with a partner, though in all countries women held more positive expectations toward their post union formation economic situation than men. This result likely reflects the lingering traditional gender structure of the society, with men faced with the responsibility of being the main breadwinner in the family. Such an interpretation would seem to be supported by the fact that this gender gap was smallest in Sweden, France and Belgium, the countries in the current sample with the most egalitarian gender structure. Potential restrictions in personal freedom by forming a co-residential relationship, on the other hand, seem to be less important, particularly among women.

  • 3. Bergnéhr, Disa
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The non-modern child? Ambivalence about parenthood among young adults2013Inngår i: The Social Meaning of Children and Fertility Change in Europe / [ed] Anne Lise Ellingssaeter, An-Magritt Jensen, Merete Lie, London: Routledge, 2013Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we investigate the meanings that having a child connotes for young adults in Sweden. In a rare research design, we draw on both survey data and focus group interviews. We investigate and discuss the ambivalence found in the data by asking the following questions: How do men and women answer survey questions about the positive and negative implications having a child may have on their life? How do men and women in focus group interviews reason about the implications that a child may have on their life? Both sorts of data provide evidence that young adults in Sweden are concerned about restrictions in their personal freedomas an expected negative consequence of becoming parents. Men seem more worried about restricted personal freedom than are young women, and this is the main reason behind their feeling ambivalent. The overwhelming majority regard becoming a parent as a natural step to take and that the child adds meaning to life.

  • 4.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Normer och värderingar om jämställdhet och familjebildning2013Inngår i: Jordemodern, ISSN 0021-7468, nr 4, s. 4-5Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 5.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Goldscheider, Calvin
    Goldscheider, Frances
    What integrates the second generation?: Factors affecting family transitions to adulthood in Sweden2008Inngår i: International Migration in Europe: New trends and new methods of analysis, Amsterdam University Press , 2008, s. 225-246Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 6.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Goldscheider, Frances
    Ambivalence about Children in the Family Building Process in Sweden2014Inngår i: Finnish Yearbook of Population Research, ISSN 1796-6183, E-ISSN 1796-6191, Vol. 49, s. 57-71Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden provides strong support for childbearing and parenthood, including generously subsidizd medical, maternal, and child care, paid parental leave, and child allowances. In this context, attitudes towards parenthood are likely to have a particularly strong impact on the decision about whether and when to have children. We examine the links between first births and holding attitudes about children, not just of positive and negative attitudes, but also of ambivalence, namely those who both value children but also value the things that compete with parenthood for young adults' time and resources. Our analysis shows, measuring attitudes before the transition to parenthood, that ambivalence about childbearing delays the transition to parenthood, but not nearly as much as holding purely negative attitudes. Further, reporting an ambivalent experience from the first child had no significant effect on further childbearing, which testifies to the strong two-child norm in Sweden.

  • 7.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Goldscheider, Frances
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Attitudes to the gender division of labor and the transition to fatherhood: Are egalitarian men in Sweden more likely to remain childless?2016Inngår i: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 59, nr 3, s. 269-284Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Most European countries, including Sweden, have witnessed considerable postponement of first births over the past several decades, and societal gender equality has been mentioned among the central reasons for the delay in childbearing. Continued postponement of parenthood over the life course can result in final childlessness, i.e. the individual will reach the end of his/her reproductive period without having become a parent. As levels of final childlessness have been increasing in most European countries, studies of childlessness have become more common. However, most of these studies deal exclusively with women, and the theorizing regarding what leads to final childlessness, particularly among men, is clearly underdeveloped. In this paper we will contribute to this research area by investigating the long-term relationships between attitudes toward domestic gender equality and men's transition to parenthood in Sweden. Our dependent variable is a close approximation of final childlessness. We use Swedish panel survey data on attitudes to the gender division of labor among still childless young adults aged 22-30 in 1999, combined with register data on births in the period 1999-2012. The article shows that the initial delay in becoming fathers evidenced by more egalitarian men is not made up in the long term.

  • 8.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. Demografiska avdelningen.
    Noack, Turid
    Lyngstad, Torkild
    Shared housework in Norway and Sweden: Advancing the gender revolution2008Inngår i: Journal of European Social Policy, Vol. 18, nr 3, s. 275-288Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 9. Gayle, Kaufman
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. Demografiska avdelningen.
    Employer policies, job characteristics and fertility in Sweden2008Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 10. Goldscheider, Fran
    et al.
    Goldscheider, Calvin
    Bernhardt, Eva M.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Creating Egalitarian Families among the Adult Children of Turkish- and Polish-Origin Immigrants in Sweden2011Inngår i: The international migration review, ISSN 0197-9183, E-ISSN 1747-7379, Vol. 45, nr 1, s. 68-88Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the factors shaping egalitarian family relationships among those with two Swedish-born parents and those with at least one parent born in Poland or Turkey. We ask: (1) What factors affect sharing domestic tasks and do they also shape the division of child care responsibilities? (2) Do these effects differ, depending on the extent of exposure to Swedish life? We analyze data from a longitudinal survey conducted between 1999 and 2003. Holding egalitarian work-family attitudes affects actual sharing of housework, but much more for those growing up in more socially integrated than in less integrated families.

  • 11. Goldscheider, Frances
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Brandén, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Domestic gender equality and childbearing in Sweden2013Inngår i: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 29, s. 1097-1126Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Sweden, which is among the most gender-equal societies in the world, combines, modern. family patterns such as unmarried cohabitation, delayed parenthood, high maternal labor force participation, and high break-up rates - all usually linked with low birth rates - with relatively high fertility. Sweden also has a high level of shared parental responsibility for home and children. OBJECTIVE After decades of late 20th century research showing that increasing gender equality in the workplace was linked with lower fertility, might gender equality in the home increase fertility? METHODS Using data from the Swedish Young Adult Panel Study (YAPS), we use Cox regression to examine the effects on first, second, and third births of 1) holding attitudes about sharing equally in the care of the home and children, and 2) actual sharing in these domestic tasks. RESULTS Our analysis shows that, measuring attitudes before the transition to parenthood and actual practice four years later, it is inconsistency between sharing attitudes and the actual division of housework that reduces the likelihood of continued childbearing, especially on second births among women. CONCLUSIONS As women are most likely to confront an inconsistent situation, with egalitarian ideals in a household without equal sharing, it is clear that having a partner who does not share housework is depressing Swedish fertility.

  • 12. Goldscheider, Frances
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Lappegård, Trude
    Studies of Men's Involvement in the Family:: Part 1: Introduction2014Inngår i: Journal of family issues, ISSN 0192-513X, E-ISSN 1552-5481, Vol. 35, nr 7, s. 879-890Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue (like the one to follow) is designed to highlight research on men’s increased involvement in their families, focusing both on the antecedents that are linked with their involvement and on the consequences that may follow. Thus we show that such research is consistent with our theoretical view that the ongoing gender revolution has two parts. The first half, in which the “separate spheres” are broached by women’s increased participation in paid work, strained the family, but the second, in which the separation between the spheres is finally dissolved by men’s taking an active role in their families, contributing to the care of their children and homes, strengthens the family. This issue focuses on Scandinavia, where both halves of the gender revolution are more advanced than in other industrialized countries; the second issue, although not neglecting Scandinavia, includes not only research on the United States but also cross-national studies.

  • 13. Goldscheider, Frances
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Lappegård, Trude
    The Gender Revolution: A Framework for Understanding Changing Family and Demographic Behavior2015Inngår i: Population and Development Review, ISSN 0098-7921, E-ISSN 1728-4457, Vol. 41, nr 2, s. 207-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that the trends normally linked with the second demographic transition (SDT) may be reversed as the gender revolution enters its second half by including men more centrally in the family. We develop a theoretical argument about the emerging consequences of this stage of the gender revolution and review research results that bear on it. The argument compares the determinants and consequences of recent family trends in industrialized societies provided by two narratives: the SDT and the gender revolution in the public and private spheres. Our argument examines differences in theoretical foundations and positive vs. negative implications for the future. We focus primarily on the growing evidence for turnarounds in the relationships between measures of women's human capital and union formation, fertility, and union dissolution, and consider evidence that men's home involvement increases union formation and fertility and decreases union instability. Although the family trends underlying the SDT and the gender revolution narratives are ongoing and a convincing view of the phenomenon has not yet emerged, the wide range of recent research results documenting changing, even reversing relationships suggests that the gender approach is increasingly the more fruitful one.

  • 14. Kaufman, Gayle
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Gender, work and childbearing: couple analysis of work adjustments after the transition to parenthood2015Inngår i: Community, Work and Family, ISSN 1366-8803, E-ISSN 1469-3615, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 1-18Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focusses on Swedish couples' work adjustment following the transition to parenthood. Specifically, we ask whether couples' gender role attitudes influence whether they make adjustments to their work situations after the end of the parental leave. Using couple data from the Young Adult Panel Study , we find that both partners are more likely to make work adjustments when both partners hold egalitarian attitudes. It is also mre likely that only the male partne will make work changes when both partners are egalitarian. When one partner holds more egalitarian attitudes than the other partner, it tends to have a stronger impact on the work adjustment of the more egalitarian partner. For example, couples with egalitarian male partners are more than three times as likely  to have the male partner change his work situation as couples in which neither partner holds egalitarian attitudes. While less consistent, there is some evidence that female egalitarian attitudes increase the likelihood of female work changes.

  • 15. Kaufman, Gayle
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    His and Her Job: What Matters Most for Fertility Plans and Actual Childbearing?2012Inngår i: Family Relations, ISSN 0197-6664, E-ISSN 1741-3729, Vol. 61, nr 4, s. 686-697Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines workplace culture and fertility plans and transitions in Sweden. This study goes beyond previous research in examining the effect of particular job characteristics as well as the influence of a partner's job characteristics on women's and men's birth plans and transitions. We use data from the 1999 and 2003 Swedish Young Adult Panel Study. Results indicate that men are more likely to intend to have a child if their partner's job makes it easy to take parental leave or work part-time. Women are more likely to intend to have a child if their partner's job pays well. In addition, men whose job pays well are more likely to have a child. This research suggests that family-friendly policies may enhance fertility indirectly through men's fertility decision making.

  • 16. Kaufman, Gayle
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Goldscheider, Frances
    Enduring Egalitarianism? Family Transitions and Attitudes Toward Gender Equality in Sweden2017Inngår i: Journal of family issues, ISSN 0192-513X, E-ISSN 1552-5481, Vol. 38, nr 13, s. 1878-1898Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research in industrialized countries finds that attitudes toward gender equality are affected by family-related transitions as young adults with egalitarian attitudes based on growing equality between the sexes in the public sphere of education and work encounter a much less equal situation in the private sphere of the family. Sweden, however, is a society known for its emphasis on gender equality in the family. This study examines the effect of family transitions on attitudes toward gender equality, asking whether egalitarian attitudes can withstand changing family transitions in Sweden. Using longitudinal data from the Young Adult Panel Study, we examine six different family transitions and three measures of attitudes toward gender equality for men and women, with only three significant findings across 18 coefficients. We conclude that most Swedish young adults possess enduring attitudes, likely because there is strong state support for families and gender sharing in the private sphere.

  • 17. Moors, Guy
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. Demografiska avdelningen.
    Splitting up or getting married?: Competing risk analysis of transitions among cohabiting couples in Sweden2008Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 18.
    Moors, Guy
    et al.
    Tilburg University, Holland.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Splitting up or getting married?: Competing Risk Analysis of Transitions Among Cohabiting Couples in Sweden2009Inngår i: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 52, nr 3, s. 227-247Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we investigate which ideational variables influence the propensity of cohabiting couples to transform their union into marriage, separation or continued cohabitation. The question is particularly relevant in the Swedish context of considerable social acceptance of unmarried cohabitation even among parents. A two-wave panel study including 705 never-married respondents cohabiting at the time of the first survey shows that ideational factors influence subsequent behaviour, even when different sets of control variables are included in the model. Familistic attitudes, work-related values and reflections about the quality of the relationship prove to be predictors of the transition to either marriage or separation, even when intentions are taken into account.

  • 19. Noack, Turid
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Wiik, Kenneth Aarskaug
    Cohabitation or Marriage? Contemporary Living Arrangements in the West2013Inngår i: Contemporary Issues in Family Studies: Global Perspectives on Partnerships, Parenting and Support in a Changing World / [ed] Angela Abela and Janet Walker, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2013, 1Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 20.
    Olah, Livia
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Sweden: Combining childbearing and gender equality2008Inngår i: Demographic Research, Vol. 19, nr 28, s. 1105-1144Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is the forerunner of the Second Demographic Transition. Fertility trends have fluctuated greatly since the 1960s, and the 1990s showed both European-highest and lowest-ever-in-Sweden levels, while the cohort pattern has been relatively stable. Period fluctuations have been accompanied by a postponement of entering committed partnerships and parenthood as well as an increasing instability of family relationships. The awareness and the availability of effective contraceptives have been extensive since the mid-1970s, the year the liberal abortion law was introduced. Post-modern values are dominant in this highly secularized society, but ideal family size is among the highest in the European Union, and childlessness has remained at a relatively low level. Ethnic diversification has increased over time, with about one-fifth of the population having a ‘foreign background’ in the early 2000s. The level of female labor-force participation is the highest in Europe (although mothers of pre-schoolers often work part-time), and young women are just as highly educated as men. Family policies, based on the principle of equality across social groups and gender, seem to play an important role in keeping fertility relatively high. In combination with other factors, family policies also play a role in the fluctuations of fertility rates, as eligibility to parental-leave and benefits as well as the availability of public childcare are linked to parents’ labor-force attachment.

  • 21. Ruppanner, Leah
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Brandén, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Division of housework and his and her view of housework fairness: A typology of Swedish couples2017Inngår i: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 36, s. 501-524, artikkel-id 16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Housework studies have long documented a fairness paradox, whereby unequal divisions of housework are evaluated as fair. Gender equality, both at home and at work, is strongly normative in a highly egalitarian country like Sweden, but not always matched by an equally egalitarian situation in the family which are often viewed as fair.

    Objective: To explore the relationship between housework-sharing and perceived fairness of this division, using both partners’ reports, to identify how Swedish couples cluster across these measures and what individual characteristics predict cluster membership.

    Methods: Using the couple-level design of the 2009 wave of the Young Adult Panel Study (YAPS, n=1,026), we are able to advance the research field and evaluate housework experience within broader couple dynamics. Our approach is exploratory and develops a typology using latent class analysis.

    Results: We identify six latent groups, with distinct features. The modal Swedish-couple category comprises those who share housework equally and agree that this arrangement is fair (33% of the couples). Applying a distributive justice perspective, we find that childhood socialization, presence of children in the household, and the distribution of employment, education, income, and egalitarianism across couples are important predictors of cluster membership.

    Conclusions: We find that equal-sharing/fair couples are most common in the Swedish context, suggesting clear benefits from Sweden’s expansive gender policies. Yet, there seems to be a generational divide, whereby Swedish women who witnessed housework inequality in their parental home are increasingly dissatisfied when this inequality replicates in their own lives.

    Contribution: Demonstrating that housework allocations, conflict and fairness may reflect different types of couples rather than associations across those measures.

  • 22. Schytt, E.
    et al.
    Nilsen, A. B. V.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Still childless at the age of 28 to 40 years: A cross-sectional study of Swedish women's and men's reproductive intentions2014Inngår i: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 5, nr 1, s. 23-29Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Delayed childbearing is associated with adverse reproductive outcomes. Our aim was to investigate Swedish women's and men's childbearing intentions at the age of 28, 32, 36 and 40 years, in terms of: (1) time point for a first child, (2) number of children, and (3) reasons for not yet having children. Methods: Cross-sectional data from the Swedish Young Adult Panel Study, including 365 childless women and 356 childless men aged 28, 32, 36 and 40 years who responded to a questionnaire in 2009. Descriptive and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results: Most 28- and 32-year-olds intended to have children, but only 32% of women and 37% of men aged 36/40 years (merged), many of whom still postponed childbearing. Reasons for remaining childless differed by age. Most prominent in the 36/40-year-olds were: lack of a partner (women 60%, men 59%), no desire for children (women 44%, men 44%), not mature enough (women 29%, men 35%), and wanting to do other things before starting a family (women 26%, men 33%). The 36/40-year-olds had the highest odds for infertility problems (OR 3.8; CI 95% 1.8-7.9) and lacking a suitable partner (OR 1.8 CI 95% 1.1-3.0), and lower odds for reasons related to work and financial situation. Conclusions: Many childless 36- and 40-year-olds intended to have children but seemed to overestimate their fecundity. The most prominent reasons for being childless were: not having wanted children up to now, lack of a partner, infertility problems, and prioritising an independent life.

  • 23.
    Thomson, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Education, values and cohabitation in Sweden2010Inngår i: Marriage and Family Review, ISSN 0149-4929, E-ISSN 1540-9635, Vol. 46, s. 1-21Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 24. Wiik, Kenneth Aarskaug
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. Demografiska avdelningen.
    Noack, Turid
    Love or money?: Marriage intentions amon young cohabitors in Norway and Sweden2008Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 25. Wiik, Kenneth Aarskaug
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Noack, Turid
    Love or Money?: Marriage Intentions among Young Cohabitors in Norway and Sweden2010Inngår i: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 53, nr 3, s. 269-287Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Using data from Sweden and Norway on cohabitors aged 25 to 35, we examine the association between socio-economic resources, relationship quality and commitment and cohabitors' marriage intentions. The individualization process, i.e. the arguably growing importance of individual choice, leads us to assume that relationship assessments are more important predictors of marriage intentions than socio-economic variables. Nonetheless, multivariate results show that university education and having a partner whose education is higher than one's own increase the likelihood that cohabitors intend to marry. Likewise, being satisfied with and committed to the union is positively related to having marriage plans. Separate analyses for men and women reveal that whereas commitment is positively related to women's marriage intentions, men's marriage intentions are significantly more influenced by their own education, income, as well as the income of their partners. In this sense, one conclusion to be drawn is that both love and money are associated with cohabitors' intention to marry.

  • 26.
    Wiik, Kenneth
    et al.
    Statistisk sentralbyrå, Oslo.
    Noack, Turid
    Statistisk sentralbyrå, Oslo.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    A Study of Commitment and Relationship Quality in Sweden and Norway2009Inngår i: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 71, nr 3, s. 465-477Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Scandinavian countries are often cited as examples of countries where cohabitation is largely indistinguishable from marriage. Using survey data from Norway and Sweden (N=2,923) we analyzed differences between cohabitors and married individuals in relationship seriousness, relationship satisfaction and dissolution plans. Our analyses reveal that cohabitors overall are less serious and less satisfied with their relationships and are more likely to consider ending their current relationship than are married respondents. The views of cohabitors who report that they intend to marry their current partner within 2 years, however, differ much less from those of married respondents than cohabitors with no marriage plans. This finding suggests that even in Scandinavia cohabitors are a heterogeneous group.

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