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  • 1. Abelin, Åsa
    et al.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Spanish accented Swedish – when the neighbor becomes a fir-tree2019In: Comunicación Social: Lingüística, Medios Masivos, Arte, Etnología, Folclor y otras ciencias afines / [ed] María Rosa Álvarez Silva, Alex Muñoz Alvarado, Leonel Ruiz Miyares, Santiago de Cuba: Ediciones Centro de Lingüística Aplicada , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Haslam, Mara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    The importance of aspirated initial stops in English as a lingua franca2016In: Proceedings of the 7th Pronunciation in Second Language Learning and Teaching Conference / [ed] John Levis, Huong Le, Ivana Lucic, Evan Simpson, Sonca Vo, 2016, p. 66-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A significant proportion of the population of the world is made up of users of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF). Jenkins (2000) published the Lingua Franca Core (LFC), a syllabus for ELF pronunciation, including the claim that the fortis/lenis distinction must be preserved on English stop consonants for successful ELF intelligibility. The present study evaluates the relationship between Voice Onset Time (VOT) and how the sounds are perceived by ELF listeners. 101 tokens produced during ELF interaction which contained the stops /b/, /p/, /d/, /t/, /g/, or /k/ were played for 9 Swedish listeners, who could indicate that they heard either the word or its minimal-pair counterpart, e.g. bees or peas. The relationship between VOT and perceived stop was analyzed, with the expectation that longer VOTs would be associated with fortis consonants and shorter VOTs would be associated with lenis consonants. Results followed the predicted pattern for /d/ and /g/ but not for /t/ and /k/. In addition, the pattern observed for /p/ and /b/ is the reverse of the pattern found for the other consonants. These results suggest that further research into the LFC’s claim about the fortis/lenis distinction and other LFC claims are warranted.

  • 3. Huhtamäki, Martina
    et al.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Uttalets plats i undervisningen i svenska som andraspråk2017In: AFinLA-e: Soveltavan kielitieteen tutkimuksia, ISSN 1798-7822, no 10, p. 45-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a case study about pronunciation teaching in Swedish as a second language. The aim of this study is to compare pronunciation teaching for adults in Finland and Sweden. Data were gathered via interviews with eight teachers and observations of eight Swedish classes. The theoretical framework is language teacher cognition, which implies that we compare what teachers say with what they actually do in the classrooms. The study shows that teachers in both countries find pronunciation a central field of Swedish teaching. However, they think that they lack methods for pronunciation teaching. Most of the pronunciation teaching observed is implicit and integrated in the teaching of other elements, such as vocabulary and grammar. In Sweden, there were more examples of explicit pronunciation teaching than in Finland. In Finland, the minority position of Swedish implies certain challenges for teaching pronunciation and other aspects of the language. Overall, there was much correspondence between the interviews and the observed classes in the two countries.

  • 4. Håkansson, Gisela
    et al.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Språktypologi2018In: Språkutveckling och språkstörning hos bar, del 3: Flerspråkighet - utveckling och svårigheter / [ed] Eva-Kristina Salameh, Ulrika Nettelbladt, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 1, p. 101-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5. Kuronen, Mikko
    et al.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Olika fonetiska drags relativa betydelse för upplevd inföddlikhet i svenska2017In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 134-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här undersökningen analyseras olika fonetiska drags betydelse för upplevd inföddlikhet i sverigesvenska som andraspråk. Lyssnarna (n = 39) bedömde uttalets målspråklighet i imiterade talprov. Resultaten visar att de segmentella målspråksavvikelserna hade störst betydelse för upplevd inföddlikhet. Målspråksavvikelserna i yttrandeintonation, rytm och tonaccenterna påverkade inte lyssnarna i samma utsträckning som de segmentella bristerna. Prov med L2-intonation och målspråkliga segment fick lika bra bedömning – på gränsen mellan uppfattbar och icke-uppfattbar brytning – som prov med målspråklig intonation och målspråkliga segment. Om segmenten var målspråkliga, fick prov med L2-aktig rytm och målspråklig rymt en likvärdig bedömning. Sammantaget visar resultaten att (i) målspråkliga segmentkvaliteter är av central betydelse för ett mycket bra och/eller inföddlikt uttal och (ii) åtminstone i vårt empiriska upplägg med uppläst tal som material hade segmenten en starkare korrelation med upplevd inföddlikhet än prosodin. Eftersom segment tycks vara av stor betydelse för hur lyssnarna bedömer uttalet, ska de inte underskattas som inlärningsmål vid uttalsundervisningen.

  • 6. Lindgren, Maria
    et al.
    Svensson, GudrunZetterholm, ElisabethStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Forskare bland personal och elever: Forskningssamarbete om språk- och identitetsutveckling på en flerspråkig skola2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Lindström, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Tangentnedslag och pauser i flerspråkiga elevers skrivprocess2019In: RASK: Internationalt tidsskrift for sprog og kommunikation, ISSN 0909-8976, no 49, p. 67-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Salameh, Eva-Kristina
    et al.
    Nettelbladt, Ulrika
    Andersson, Ketty
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Flerspråkig utveckling2018In: Språkutveckling och språkstörning hos barn, del 3: Flerspråkighet – utveckling och svårigheter / [ed] Eva-Kristina Salameh, Ulrika Nettelbladt, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 33-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9. Svensson, Gudrun
    et al.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Vad bedömer man och hur?: Olika bedömares uppfattningar om två elevtexter2015In: Skrivande i skolan / [ed] Lindgren, M., Svensson, G., Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2015, p. 145-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10. Tronnier, Mechtild
    et al.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Foreign accent: Influences of the sound system of Serbian on the production of Swedish L22015In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2015 / [ed] Svensson Lundmark, M., Ambrazaitis, G., van de Weijer, J., Lund: Lund University , 2015, p. 95-100Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Among the second language learners of Swedish from the group of first language speakers (L1) of the one of the standard languages that formed the pluricentric language Serbo-Croatian, Serbian currently seems to be most frequent L1. Based on recordings of L2-speech produced by two Serbian L1-speakers, living in Sweden, this contribution presents typical pronunciation features in L2-Swedish, in order to provide teachers with a better understanding of foreign accent characteristics when teaching Swedish as a second language.

  • 11. Tronnier, Mechtild
    et al.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Patterns of prominence in L2: Observations from learners of Swedish with L1s of diverse prominence properties2015In: Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences / [ed] Maria Wolters, Judy Livingstone, Bernie Beattie, Rachel Smith, Mike MacMahon, Jane Stuart-Smith, Jim Scobbie, Glasgow: University of Glasgow , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish has – like other Germanic languages – flexible stress placement, which underlies morphological rules and is also based on the individual word’s origin. The achievement of the correct usage when learning Swedish is challenging. As second language learners of Swedish in the classrooms present speakers of a variety of first languages (L1s), the opportunity has been taken to have a closer look on how stress in L2 is handled. For that reason, learners with Somali, Albanian, Vietnamese and Farsi as their first language were recorded when speaking L2-Swedish. These languages exemplify a variety of systems in regard to the usage of stress. The recorded speech was analysed and the observed way of administering stress in L2 was compared to the organisation of stress in L1.

  • 12. Tronnier, Mechtild
    et al.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Rhythmic contrast between Swedish and Albanian as an explanation for L2-speech?2015In: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Monolingual and Bilingual Speech 2015 / [ed] Elena Babatsouli, David Ingram, Chania, Greece: Institute of Monolingual and Bilingual Speech , 2015, p. 396-402Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on observations of the rhythmic structure of L2-speech produced by L1-speakers of Albanian – which suggest the occurrence of transfer – a study is presented here that compares durational aspects between the two languages. In order to do this, speech read by Swedish and Albanian L1-speakers was recorded and investigated, and normalized durational factors were analysed. The results, however, do not support the assumption that there is variation in the rhythmic structure between the two languages. According to the results, transfer cannot explain previous observations.

  • 13. Tronnier, Mechtild
    et al.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Syllable duration in L1 and its impact on the prominence level in L22015In: ISMBS 2015: Abstracts, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The correct production of contrast in prominence in a second language is challengingfor the learners. Not only is there the placement of stress on the appropriate syllable in the word that has to be learned, but also features which are used to express such a contrast have to be acquired, and to what extent they are used. Such features can be based on the variation of sound intensity, segment and/or syllable length, presence of tonal accents and degree of articulatory precision. Furthermore, the level of prominence of several syllables in an utterance is not just twofold, but can be primary, secondary or tertiary.When studying accented L2-speech of Swedish produced by L1-speakers of Albanian, it was not always clear which syllable in a word was carrying the highest level of stress. Therefore, one of the foreign accent features is not simply based on incorrect stress placement, but there is a need for further explanations. Observations from auditory analysis were that vowel quality reduction –as required in unstressed syllables in Swedish in most cases –was not carried out sufficiently. Visual inspection of the speech wave gave the impression that vowels seemed to be of similar length and at almost equal distance from each other, no matter if they were part of an anticipated stressed or unstressed syllable.Based on these observations, the current contribution aims to give an account for similarities or dissimilarities in syllable length between Swedish and Albanian produced by L1-speakers and L2-Swedish produced by Albanian L1-speakers. Hereby, the approach taken includes the measurements of syllable duration of spontaneous and read speech and the calculation of the nPVI. If the observation presented above is correct, the nPVI for Albanian L1-speech would have a lower value –referring to a language which is more similar to a syllable-timed-language –than the nPVI for Swedish L1-speech, similar to what is referred to as stress-timed. The analysis of the nPVI carried out on L2-Swedish speech, produced by L1-speakers of Albanian will then be compared to the indices received from L1-speech. It is assumed, that the nPVI of L2-Swedish is closer in value to the nPVI of L1-Albanian than to the nPVI of L1-speakers’ Swedish. The analysis of read speech is added here to rule out that the above stated observations were merely based on an artefact. Such an artefact could have been caused by the rather unnatural situation of language production when reading -when the subject’s attention is drawn to the text and effort is made to reproduce the text as clearly as possible.

  • 14. Tronnier, Mechtild
    et al.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    The same or different: A comparison of the rhythmic structure of Swedish and Albanian2016In: Poznan Studies in Contemporary Linguistics, ISSN 1732-0747, E-ISSN 1897-7499, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 745-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this contribution is to give an account of the similarities or dissimilarities of the speech rhythm of Swedish and Albanian. In this study, temporal features were focused on to ascertain rhythmic differences between the two languages. The interest for this study arose when a clear rhythmic variation was observed in the accented Swedish L2 speech produced by L1-speakers of Albanian, namely the lack of attributes like reduction in unstressed syllables. It was thus hypothesised that speakers of L1-Swedish would produce larger variation in length of vocalic and/or consonantal intervals than L1-speakers of Albanian. The recorded material comprised read speech produced by seven L1-speakers of both languages. Various acoustic metrics were applied to analyse the rhythm. Results show differences between Swedish and Albanian speech for both non-normalised and normalised metrics only for the vocalic intervals, but with an unexpected outcome. In that way, larger length variation for vocalic intervals in the Albanian material than in the Swedish material was found. Therefore, the occurrence of reduction phenomena also in Albanian can be stated. These findings contradict the assumption that transfer from L1-Albanian was the reason for lack of reduction in L2-Swedish, as observed previously.

  • 15. Tvingstedt, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Morgan, Eva
    Salameh, Eva-Kristina
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Flerspråkighet i skolan2018In: Språkutveckling och språkstörning hos barn, del 3: Flerspråkighet – utveckling och svårigheter / [ed] Eva-Kristina Salameh, Ulrika Nettelbladt, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 321-364Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Vuorenpää, Sari
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Första mötet med den svenska skolan – kartläggningssamtal med nyanländ elev2019In: Klassrumsforskning och språk(ande): Rapport från ASLA-symposiet i Karlstad, 12-13 april, 2018 / [ed] Birgitta Ljung Egeland, Tim Roberts, Erica Sandlund, Pia Sundqvist, Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2019, p. 187-206Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Barn skriver på flera språk2017In: Educare - Vetenskapliga skrifter, ISSN 1653-1868, Vol. 1, p. 99-117Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Forskningen i undervisning2016In: Forskare bland personal och elever: Forskningssamarbete om språk- och identitetsutveckling på en flerspråkig skola / [ed] Lindgren Maria, Svensson Gudrun, Zetterholm Elisabeth, Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2016, p. 31-45Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Swedish exotic vowels in L2 pronunciation2017In: Proceedings of the 8th annual pronunciation in second language learning and teaching conference (ISSN: 2380-9566) / [ed] Mary O'Brien, John Levis, Calgary: University of Calgary, 2017, p. 222-227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning a new language as an adult is often a hard task, particularly the pronunciation of new speech sounds. Earlier research has shown (e.g., Bannert, 1990; Zetterholm & Tronnier, 2017) that second language learners of Swedish have difficulties learning to pronounce some Swedish vowels, especially the front rounded vowels, and distinguishing them from each other and from unrounded vowels. For intelligible speech, it is of importance that there is an audible distinction in the pronunciation of the different rounded vowels. Otherwise a native listener might misunderstand the speaker referring to the number of minimal pairs with the vowel as the distinctive feature. In comparison with languages around the world, the Swedish vowel inventory is relatively large (Ladefoged, 2005), and some are exotic from a worldwide perspective. These vowels are one of the most difficult pronunciation features of Swedish pronunciation for second language learners to master. The aim of this paper is to provide information about the vowels of Swedish with a focus on rounded vowels that are challenging for L2 learners of Swedish and to present some techniques to facilitate the accurate pronunciation of the exotic vowels.

  • 20.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Swedish for immigrants: Teachers’ opinions on the teaching of pronunciation2017In: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Monolingual and Bilingual speech 2017 / [ed] Elena Babatsouli, Chania: Institute of monolingual and bilingual speech , 2017, p. 308-312Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines teachers’ opinions on the teaching of pronunciation in Swedish for immigrants (SFI). A web-based survey containing questions about teachers’ experiences of teaching pronunciation and their education in second language pronunciation was distributed to teachers in Sweden. The purpose of the survey was to learn more about how pronunciation is taught to adult learners of Swedish as a second language. 92 teachers of SFI answered questions about their approach and beliefs concerning teaching pronunciation. Almost all of them reported that it is difficult to teach pronunciation because they do not have enough training in teaching it. Only half of the teachers have any kind of formal education in pronunciation methodology. However, they all consider pronunciation instruction to be of importance for second language learners. The goal for second language teaching in general is to obtain comprehensible speech in order to have an increased chance of integration into the society. Only a few teachers have special lessons focusing on pronunciation. Most of them take the opportunity to talk about and teach pronunciation embedded in lessons concerning, for example, grammar. The teachers answer that vowel quality, phrase intonation and word stress is of importance when teaching pronunciation, but they also mention that prosody is difficult to teach. The results of this survey raise questions regarding teachers' education in teaching pronunciation and the teachers’ knowledge about Swedish phonology and phonetics.

  • 21.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Teaching Swedish pronunciation2018In: Cross-linguistic research in monolingual and bilingual speech / [ed] Elena Babatsouli, Chania: ISMBS , 2018, p. 289-301Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Abelin, Åsa
    Swedish and Somali listeners' attitudes towards L2 Swedish speech2017In: Scandinavian Philology, ISSN 0202-2397, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 193-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foreign accented speech does not always have an impact on intelligibility. However, a foreign accent may have an impact on verbal communication even though the listener understands the message and this is often related to listeners’ attitude. It is shown that listeners with the same first language (L1) rate their own accent more positively and comprehensible in comparison to listeners with other linguistic backgrounds. On the other hand, other studies show the opposite without any indication for intelligibility advantage for a speaker with the same first language as the listeners. Phonetic and phonological contrasts between languages also have an impact on foreign accent and the listeners’ judgments concerning intelligibility and pleasantness. In this pilot study, the aim is to examine if Somali listeners rate speakers with a Somali accent of Swedish higher for intelligibility and pleasantness compared to native listeners of Swedish, and whether attitudes to L2 speech did or did not differ from one another.

  • 23.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Abelin, Åsa
    Swedish and Somali listeners' attitudes towards L2 Swledish speech2017In: Scandinavian Philology [Skandinavskaja filologija], Vol. 15, no 2, p. 193-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foreign accented speech does not always have an impact on intelligibility. However, a foreign accent may have an impact on verbal communication even though the listener understands the message and this is often related to listeners’ attitude. It is shown that listeners with the same first language (L1) rate their own accent more positively and comprehensible in comparison to listeners with other linguistic backgrounds. On the other hand, other studies show the opposite without any indication for intelligibility advantage for a speaker with the same first language as the listeners. Phonetic and phonological contrasts between languages also have an impact on foreign accent and the listeners’ judgments concerning intelligibility and pleasantness. In this pilot study, the aim is to examine if Somali listeners rate speakers with a Somali accent of Swedish higher for intelligibility and pleasantness compared to native listeners of Swedish, and whether attitudes to L2 speech did or did not differ from one another.

  • 24.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Bergh Nestlog, Ewa
    Elevtexter på flerspråkiga elevers olika språk2017In: Språk och norm: Rapport från ASLA:s symposium, Uppsala universitet, 21-22 april 2016 / [ed] Saga Bendegard, Ulla Marttala, Maria Westman, Uppsala: ASLA: Svenska föreningen för tillämpad språkvetenskap , 2017, p. 178-186Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I de allra flesta svenska klassrum finns idag elever med olika språk utöver det svenska språket. Forskning (t.ex. Gibbons 2016) visar att det är värdefullt för såväl språk-som kunskapsutvecklingen att eleverna får möjlighet att använda alla sina språkkunskaper i skolan, det som kan kopplas till begreppettranslanguaging (García & Wei 2014). I en longitudinell studie har vi följt några elever från årskurs 1 till 3 på en skola som ligger i ett mångkulturellt område där svenska bara är ett av många språk som talas. I skolan är dock svenska det gemensamma språket.

  • 25.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Håkansson, Gisela
    Beskrivning av fonologi och grammatik i olika språk2018In: Språkutveckling och språkstörning hos barn, del 3: Flerspråkighet – utveckling och svårigheter / [ed] Eva-Kristina Salameh, Ulrika Nettelbladt, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 121-159Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Tronnier, Mechtild
    Identifiering av fonologiska kontraster i svenska ord: Ett lyssnartest för andraspråksinlärare2016In: Svenskans beskrivning 34: Förhandlingar vid trettiofjärde sammankomsten, Lund den 22–24 oktober 2014 / [ed] Anna W. Gustafsson, Lisa Holm, Katarina Lundin, Henrik Rahm, Mechtild Tronnier, Lund: Lunds universitet , 2016, p. 457-469Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det är många olika faktorer som spelar in när man lär sig ett nytt språk och förutsättningarna ser olika ut såväl individuellt som socialt. Här finns språkliga aspekter såsom typologiska likheter och skillnader mellan det/de språk inläraren redan behärskar och målspråket samt hur mycket språklig stimulans och möjlighet till interaktion inläraren får (Abrahamsson & Bylund 2012; Flege & Liu 2001). Förstaspråkets fonologiska regler överförs ofta till andraspråket och påverkar såväl perception som produktion (Major 2008, Jarvis & Pavlenko 2010). För att kunna producera ett lyssnarvänligt uttal på målspråket är det viktigt att inläraren uppfattar de fonologiska kontrasterna då det anses föreligga en koppling mellan perception och produktion (Escudero, 2005; McAl-lister, 1995). Det är inte självklart att det alltid är de mest uppenbara språkliga kontrasterna mellan första- och andraspråket som kan vålla uttalsproblem, ibland är de små mera subtila skillnaderna svårare att identifiera och förändra (Flege 1991). Talarens uttalsvanor, dvs. de artikulatoriska vanligtvis omedvetna och inlärda rörelserna, är ibland svåra att förändra och kräver en del medvetenhet och övning hos inläraren. Den studie som presenteras här tar upp frågan huruvida andraspråksinlärare med olika modersmål kan identifiera svenska ord utifrån ordpar med fonologiska kontraster. Ordparen är utvalda utifrån tidigare forskning som visar på generella svårigheter med den svenska fonologin som förekommer vid inlärning av svenska som andraspråk (Bannert 1990; tronnier & Zetterholm 2013; Zetterholm & tronnier 2012). Syftet med studien är att ta reda på om andraspråksinlärare uppfattar den fonologiska kontrasten när de hör ord uttalade av en svensk talare. Detta är en pilotstudie och resultaten får därför anses som preliminära, men intressanta för vidare forskning i ämnet.

  • 27.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Tronnier, Mechtild
    Orthographic cues for quantity distinctions in L22019In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2019, 2019, p. 13-18Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adult second language learners often learn both written and spoken language more or less simultaneously. The orthography of the world’s languages is, however, not in a one-to-one relationship with the phonological and phonetic realisations of its words. Sometimes orthographic cues as a clue for learners can be found and taught. If not, the pronunciation of the word has to be learned from other cues than orthography. In Swedish, there is an important quantity distinction in stressed syllables, often signalled by single or double consonantal letters.

    Minimal pairs with a quantity distinction shown in the orthography were used to study to what extent that might be a cue for second language learners when reading sentences in Swedish. We found a difference between speakers that can be correlated to the learner’s first language. Obvious relationships between orthographic and phonological quantity patterns make it easier to use orthography as a cue for quantity distinction and pronunciation

  • 28.
    Zetterholm, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Tronnier, Mechtild
    Perspektiv på svenskt uttal: Fonologi, brytning och didaktik2017Book (Other academic)
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