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  • 1. Brinton, Mary C.
    et al.
    Bueno, Xiana
    Oláh, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hellum, Merete
    Postindustrial Fertility Ideals, Intentions, and Gender Inequality: A Comparative Qualitative Analysis2018In: Population and Development Review, ISSN 0098-7921, E-ISSN 1728-4457, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 281-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fertility ideals remain centered on two children per woman in most postindustrial societies, presenting a puzzle for demographers interested in explaining very low fertility. This article explores the conditions producing a gap between fertility ideals and intentions among highly educated young women and men in four postindustrial countries. We employ in-depth interviews to analyze reasoning about fertility ideals and intentions in two countries with very low fertility (Japan and Spain) and two with slightly higher fertility (the United States and Sweden). We find that American and Swedish female interviewees are more likely than those in Japan and Spain to cite work/family conflict as a reason for their ideals/intentions gap. Our results also suggest that gender inequality is more important in generating low fertility intentions among highly educated interviewees in Japan than Spain. Taken together, these findings suggest complexities in how gender inequality affects fertility intentions among the highly educated in postindustrial contexts.

  • 2.
    Carlson, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Oláh, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hobson, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Policy recommendations, Changing families and sustainable societies: Policy contexts and diversity over the life course and across generations2017Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Fahlén, Susanne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Oláh, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Childbearing Intentions and Economic Uncertainty in Contemporary Europe2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Fahlén, Susanne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Oláh, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Economic uncertainty and first-birth intentions in Europe2018In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 39, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    The demographic challenge Europe is facing due to long-term low fertility, accompanied by pronounced economic uncertainty, indicates the need for adequate policy response based on a thorough understanding of the economic uncertainty-fertility decisions-public policy nexus.

    OBJECTIVE

    We address the relationship between societal economic conditions, individual economic uncertainty, and short-term first-birth intentions of women and men in ten European countries, representing various institutional contexts before and after the Great Recession.

    METHODS

    We analyse European Social Survey data from 2004 and 2011. After addressing the macro-level association, we study the micro-level relationship in regard to perceived security of employment and income situation, based on multiple logistic regression models.

    RESULTS

    Societal economic uncertainty is negatively associated with short-term parenthood intentions, especially for men. Regarding subjective economic security, men's labour market position matters irrespectively of the institutional context, but women's labour market position matters at younger ages only and in particular welfare regimes (the Postsocialist and Familialistic regimes). Perceived income security is less important at higher ages for either gender and for women below age 30, especially in the aftermath of the crisis. Men in their early thirties show the lowest fatherhood intentions in a constrained situation.

    CONTRIBUTION

    Our findings highlight the continued importance of economic uncertainty for fertility plans, especially for men, who still seem to consider themselves as the primary earner in couples. For young employed women, a secure position is a precondition for first birth, but motherhood appears as attractive alternative to unemployment above age 30, except for Postsocialist and Universal clusters.

  • 5.
    Fahlén, Susanne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Oláh, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Work and childbearing intentions in a capability perspective: young adult women in Sweden2013In: Childbearing, women's employment and work-life balance policies in contemporary Europe / [ed] Livia Sz. Oláh, Ewa Fratczak, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 28-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the interrelation between institutional context, employment situation and childbearing intentions among young women in Sweden, a country with extensive policy support for women and men combining work and family

  • 6.
    Goldscheider, Frances
    et al.
    Brown University, USA.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Puur, Allan
    Reconciling studies of men's gender attitudes and fertility: Response to Westoff and Higgins2010In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 189-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A reflexion by Westoff and Higgins (2009) in response to a study by Puur, Oláh, Tazi-Preve and Dorbritz (2008) has been recently published in this journal. Both articles addressed the relationship between men’s gender attitudes and fertility, using different datasets and quite different measures of gender attitudes, producing divergent results. Based on that, the authors of the reflexion suggested caution regarding the conclusion of the Puur et al. analysis. We respond to their arguments here by elaborating on the theoretical underpinnings of the claim presented in the original article and thus the importance of the differences of the measures of gender attitudes applied in the two studies (gender roles in the public sphere vs. the private sphere). With this contribution, we stress the need for further research on the association of men’s gender attitudes and fertility.

  • 7. Hellum, Merete
    et al.
    Oláh, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Doing gender and gender equality’ through emotional expressions during a research interview. Views of highly educated Swedish young adults2019In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 304-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to contribute to the knowledge on how concepts of gender and gender equality are constructed within research interviews, deepening our understanding of the underlying gender system in society. We focus on emotions and emotional processes expressed during interviews on work and family when specific questions originating in the World Value Survey were asked. Our study is based on interviews with highly educated women and men, in two metropolitan areas of Sweden. In this article we seek to shed more light on how incorporating emotional expressions and the evaluation of these emotions can grasp the construction of gender and gender equality. We highlight the range of emotional expressions that appear during the interviews, differences in their usage by women and men and the links to the construction of gender and gender equality. We explore how the specific situation of the interview influences ‘doing gender and gender equality’ through emotions. Our results reveal that men and women use similar but also different emotional expressions in conforming to the gender equality norm. Men and women, interviewers and interviewees agreed on this norm, but the ways they ’performed’ the norm are gender based.

  • 8.
    Hobson, Barbara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Birthstrikes? Agency and Capabilities in the Reconciliation of Employment and Family2006In: Marriage and Family Review, ISSN 0149-4929 (electronic: 1540-9635), Vol. 39, no 3/4, p. 197-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to analyze women’s agency and fertility decisions in the context of policy configurations in welfare states for reconciling employment with having and caring for children and the changing aspirations and expectations for gender equality in families. Employing the concept of birthstriking, inspired by Amartaya Sen’s ideas on capabilities and agency freedom, we consider which individuals and families in the 1990s are delaying or not having children across 12 countries, representing four policy configuration models. Using household level data, we consider differences in education on the likelihood of having first child. We find the clearest birthstriking effects in societies where there are weak reconciliation policies for motherhood and employment and few protections for families with uncertain economic futures.

  • 9.
    Hobson, Barbara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Olah, Livia Sz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Tournant positif ou 'grève des ventres' ? Formes de résistance au modèle de l'homme gagne-pain et à la restructuration de l'État-providence” (The Positive Turn or Birthstrikes? Sites of Resistance to Residual Male Breadwinner Societies and to Welfare State Restructuring2006In: Recherches et Prévisions, ISSN 1149-1590, Vol. 83, p. 45-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we seek to unpack the layers in the relationship between women’s labor-force participation and fertility, and how this is mediated by social policy supports for combining employment and childbearing. We take up some of the research debates in both welfare state research and Demographic studies regarding the ‘positive turn’ in fertility and women’s employment. Focusing on twelve European countries, we study the mechanisms through which a particular welfare state model influences childbearing behavior.

  • 10.
    Olah, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    First childbearing at higher ages in Sweden and Hungary, from the mid-1970s to the early 1990s: A gender approach2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Below-replacement fertility has been accompanied by a dramatic increase of the mean age at first birth in most European countries in the last decades. While the delay of first birth is usually linked to women’s increasing economic independence, this does not explain why individuals who have not become a parent by their late twenties would do so later on in their lives. Also, our knowledge on whether there is a gendered pattern for the effect of factors influencing late first birth is limited. The purpose of this study is to shed more light on the mechanisms of first childbearing at higher ages from the mid-1970s to the early 1990s. We use the method of hazard regression to analyze data extracted from the Swedish and the Hungarian Family and Fertility Surveys of 1992/93. Our results show that, for both women and men in both countries, the transition to parenthood at higher ages is strongly influenced by age, previous partnership experience and current union status. In addition, educational attainment appears to be an important factor for first birth at higher ages for women in both countries, as well as for men in Sweden.

  • 11.
    Olah, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Demografiska enheten.
    Höga födelsetal i länder med utbyggd barnomsorg2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I länder med väl utbyggd offentlig barnomsorg för barn under tre år föds det fler barn per kvinna än i länder där en liten andel av barnen får offentlig barnomsorg. Detta framgår av en jämförelse mellan EU-länderna.

  • 12.
    Olah, Livia
    Stockholm University.
    Should governments in Europe be more aggressive in pushing for gender equality to raise fertility?2008Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Olah, Livia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Sweden: Combining childbearing and gender equality2008In: Demographic Research, Vol. 19, no 28, p. 1105-1144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is the forerunner of the Second Demographic Transition. Fertility trends have fluctuated greatly since the 1960s, and the 1990s showed both European-highest and lowest-ever-in-Sweden levels, while the cohort pattern has been relatively stable. Period fluctuations have been accompanied by a postponement of entering committed partnerships and parenthood as well as an increasing instability of family relationships. The awareness and the availability of effective contraceptives have been extensive since the mid-1970s, the year the liberal abortion law was introduced. Post-modern values are dominant in this highly secularized society, but ideal family size is among the highest in the European Union, and childlessness has remained at a relatively low level. Ethnic diversification has increased over time, with about one-fifth of the population having a ‘foreign background’ in the early 2000s. The level of female labor-force participation is the highest in Europe (although mothers of pre-schoolers often work part-time), and young women are just as highly educated as men. Family policies, based on the principle of equality across social groups and gender, seem to play an important role in keeping fertility relatively high. In combination with other factors, family policies also play a role in the fluctuations of fertility rates, as eligibility to parental-leave and benefits as well as the availability of public childcare are linked to parents’ labor-force attachment.

  • 14.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    CHILD-BEARING IN A GENDER EQUAL SOCIETY: An Interview with Livia Sz. Oláh - Stockholm University. Interviewed by Veronika Herche, Demographic Research Institute,Hungary2011In: FAMILYPLATFORM Online Journal, Vol. 3, p. 45-56Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Family Policies and Birth Rates.: Childbearing, Female Work, and the Time Policy of Early Childhood Education in Postwar Europe2011In: Children, Families, and States: Time Policies of Childcare, Preschool, and Primary Education in Europe / [ed] K. Hagemann, K. Jarausch and C. Allemann-Ghionda, New York and Oxford: Beghahn Books , 2011, 1, p. 113-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    First childbearing at higher ages in Sweden and Hungary, from the mid-1970s to the early 1990s: a gender approach2010In: Scandinavian Population Studies, ISSN 0782-1859, Vol. 14, p. 91-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this exploratory study is to shed more light on the mechanisms of first childbearing at higher ages from the mid-1970s to the early 1990s, based on a comparative research design. To detect a possibly gendered pattern, we analyze data on women and men separately, extracted from the Swedish and Hungarian FFS, using the method of hazard regression. The results show that the late transition to parenthood is strongly influenced by age, previous partnership experience, and current union status for both sexes, and mainly for women by educational attainment.

  • 17.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Gendering fertility: Second births in Sweden and Hungary2003In: Population: Research and Policy Review, ISSN 0167-5923, E-ISSN 1573-7829, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 171-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the growing prevalence of the dual-earner family model in industrialized countries the gendered nature of the relationship between employment and parenting has become a key issue for childbearing decisions and behavior. In such a context taking into account the societal gender structure (public policies, family-level gender relations) explicitly can enhance our understanding of contemporary fertility trends. In this paper we study the second birth, given its increasing importance in the developed world as large proportions of women remain childless or bear only one child. We focus on Sweden where gender equality is pronounced at both the societal and the family level and on Hungary where the dual-earner model has been accompanied by traditional gender relations in the home sphere. Our  analysis is based on data extracted from the Swedish and Hungarian Fertility and Family Surveys of 1992/93. We use the method of hazard regression. The results suggest that the secondbirth intensity increases as the combination of parenthood and labor-force attachment of either parent is facilitated. We see this in the effect of family policies in Sweden and in the higher second-birth intensity of couples who share family responsibilities as compared to those with traditional gender-role behavior in both countries. Also, the lack of any visible impact of men’s educational attainment in both Sweden and Hungary is probably linked to public policies as state support for families with children has reduced the importance of income for second childbearing. A positive educational gradient for Swedish women and an essentially zero gradient in Hungary reflects the success of policy measures in reducing fertility cost for more educated women in both countries.

  • 18.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Men in families in contemporary Europe: caring fathers2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Olah, Livia Sz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Policy changes and family stability: The Swedish case2001In: International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, ISSN 1360-9939, E-ISSN 1464-3707, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 118-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few decades, policies concerning family dissolution and gender equality have changed radically in Sweden accompanied by growing family instability. This development raises the question whether policies influence family behaviour. By analysing data on families with children, extracted from the Swedish Family Survey of 1992-93, some interesting policy effects are detected. Although the no-fault divorce law had hardly any long-term effect on family stability in Sweden, joint custody and father's use of parental leave seem to be important. Also, findings regarding mothers' education and employment status indicate the influence of policy, at least indirectly, on family disruption.

  • 20.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Should governments in Europe be more aggressive in pushing for gender equality to raise fertility?: The second "YES"2011In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 217-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on my contribution to a debate, organized by MPIDR, on the question displayed in the title above. I was asked to present arguments for the “yes”-response (together with Laurent Toulemon, and arguing against the “no”-side represented by Gerda Neyer and Dimiter Philipov). As pointed out in the paper, the most important theoretical reasoning relevant for this question is the gender equity theory. A number of studies provide sound empirical support to it, as discussed in the paper in details, and thereby also a rationale for a positive impact of increased gender equality on fertility. As the dual-earner family is here to stay, and given the well-known negative consequences of long-term very low fertility for a society, pushing for gender equality seems to be a reasonable strategy to be considered aiming for sustainable societal development.

  • 21.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    ‘Sweden, the Middle Way’: A Feminist Approach1998In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 47-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Olah, Livia Sz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The dissolution of first-birth unions in Sweden2000In: Zeitschrift für Familienforschung, ISSN 1437-2940, E-ISSN 2196-2154, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 90-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an attempt to shed more light on the relationship between changes in policies around family dissolution and increasing family instability among parents in Sweden from the mid-1960s to the early 1990s. Data extracted from the Swedish Family Survey of 1992/93 are analysed using the method of intensity (hazard) regression. The results suggest both direct and indirect policy effects. Such direct impacts are indicated for joint custody for children and for father's use of parental leave, while long-term influence of no-fault divorce law seems to be very limited on family stability. Indirect policy impacts are seen for the effects of educational levels and employment statuses on partnership dissolution. Also by marital status intersting differences were found regarding the determinants of parents' relationship stability in Sweden.

  • 23.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The new roles of men and women and implications for families and societies.2018In: A Demographic Perspective on Gender, Family and Health in Europe / [ed] G. Doblhammer and J. Gumà, Switzerland: Springer, 2018, 1, p. 41-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents main research findings on new gender roles and their implications for families and societies. It first depicts the development of family forms in Europe over the past fifty years, with a focus on increasingly diverse family biographies along with changes in the roles of women and men. It highlights that changes in women’s role have been more comprehensive, whereas transformation of the male role has barely started in most countries. Thereafter, views in contemporary scholarship on the interplay between the increasing family complexity and gender role changes are addressed. A detailed discussion of new challenges of transitions in and organization of family life follows, with a focus on four main topics: women’s new role and its implications for family dynamics, the gendered transition to parenthood, new gender roles in doing families, and coping strategies in family and work reconciliation under conditions of uncertainty and precariousness and impacts on fertility. A brief conclusion ends the chapter. 

  • 24.
    Olah, Livia Sz.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Zeitpolitiken und Fertilität: Fertilitätsraten, Frauenerwerbstätigkeit und die Zeitstrukturen frühkindlicher Betreuung und Bildung im Europa der Nachkriegszeit2009In: Ganztägige Bildung und Betreuung / [ed] Ludwig Stecher, Cristina Allemann-Ghionda, Werner Helsper und Eckhard Klieme, Weinheim und Basel: Beltz Verlag , 2009, Vol. 54, no Beiheft, p. 247-265Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the late 1960s, total fertility rates declined below the replacement level (i.e., 2.1 children per woman on average) all over Europe in parallel with the increasing prevalence of the dual-earner family model. Yet, birth rates have varied substantially across countries, declining to below a critical level of 1.5 births per woman in some societies, but not in others. Relying on a framework based on the gender equity theory in combination with risk aversion theory, I explore the mechanisms around fertility and the time policies of early childhood education in this paper.

  • 25.
    Olah, Livia Sz
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Fratczak, Ewa
    Warsaw School of Economics, Poland.
    Becoming a Mother in Hungary and Poland during State Socialism2004In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. SC 3, no 9, p. 213-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we study the transition to motherhood in the first co-residential union in the dual-earner context of state socialism, namely in Hungary and Poland between the late 1960s and the end of the 1980s. Our analyses are based on data extracted from the Polish and the Hungarian Fertility and Family Surveys of the early 1990s. We use the hazard regression method as our analytical tool. Our results for Hungary indicate that women’s employment does not necessarily reduce the propensity to become a mother if the combination of labor-force participation and family life has been facilitated by policy measures. In Poland however, this was more difficult, and state support was somewhat less generous, thus part-time workers and housewives had substantially higher first-birth intensity than full-time employed women. Even so, we find indication for Poland, that as policy measures increasingly improved the conditions to combine employment and family responsibilities, the propensity to have the first child increased. The timing of first birth varied greatly across educational levels. Highly educated women were more likely to postpone the transition to motherhood, which in turn resulted in their overall lower propensity to have the first child in both countries, but less so in Hungary than in Poland.

  • 26.
    Oláh, Livia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Gähler, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Gender equality perceptions, division of paid and unpaid work, and partnership dissolution in Sweden2014In: Social Forces, ISSN 0037-7732, E-ISSN 1534-7605, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 571-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increase in female employment and the decrease in gender labor specialization, there has also been a marked change in gender role attitudes. An increasing proportion of women and men has come to prefer gender egalitarianism. Yet a marked gender division of labor persists. Here, we study the interplay between individual gender role attitudes and behavior in terms of sharing paid and unpaid work with one’s partner, and implications for partnership stability. We focus on Sweden, a country with long experience of the dual-earner model and policies supporting female labor-force participation while also promoting men’s active engagement in family tasks. We test two hypotheses: first, that gender egalitarianism in attitudes and behavior per se strengthens partnership stability (the gender egalitarian model) and second, that consistency in individual attitudes and couple behavior, whether egalitarian or traditional, strengthens partnership stability (the attitude-behavior consistency model). We use data from the Swedish Young Adult Panel Study (YAPS) conducted in 1999, 2003, and 2009. We find no difference in dissolution risk between the consistent egalitarian and the consistent traditional individuals, and both categories exhibit lower dissolution risks than individuals holding gender egalitarian views but dividing workload with their spouse/partner in a gender-traditional way. These results speak in favor of the attitude-behavior consistency model of marriage.

  • 27.
    Oláh, Livia Sz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Familjepolitik påverkar viljan att skaffa barn2013In: Jordemodern, ISSN 0021-7468, no 4, p. 10-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Oláh, Livia Sz.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Fahlén, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Concluding thoughts on childbearing, women's work and work-life balance policy nexus in Europe in the dawn of 21st Century2013In: Childbearing, women's employment and work-life balance policies in contemporary Europe / [ed] Livia Sz. Olah, Ewa Fratczak, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 207-217Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book has addressed the interplay between childbearing and work and welfare, more specifically female employment and work-life balance policies, in contemporary Europe. Along with increasing scholarly interest in the topic, demographic and economic sustainability has been high on the agenda in European policymaking given substantial cross-country variations in fertility levels in the past decades, (well) below what is necessary for the replacement of the population (that is 2.05 children per woman) and not speeding up societal ageing. Focusing on childbearing choices (intentions mainly, but even desires), considered as influential predictors of future fertility, our research team has examined the importance of labour force participation on young women’s fertility plans in the context of increasing labour market flexibility in various work-life balance policy settings. We have studied five countries, two high-fertility and three low-fertility societies representing different welfare regime/policy configuration types. Our two high-fertility societies, Sweden and France, belong to different policy regimes, the former being the prime case of the Dual-Earner, and the latter belonging to the General Family Support policy configuration type to which even Germany, a low-fertility regime country belongs. The other two low-fertility societies we have studied, Poland and Hungary, represent the Transition Post-Socialist cluster.

  • 29.
    Oláh, Livia Sz.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Fahlén, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Introduction: Aspirations and uncertainties. Childbearing choices and work-life realities in Europe2013In: Childbearing, women's employment and work-life balance policies in contemporary Europe / [ed] Livia Sz. Oláh, Ewa Fratczak, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 1-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As Europe is facing a demographic challenge that in the long run jeopardizes economic growth and sustainable development, we need to deepen our understanding on the interplay of economic and reproductive aspirations and the public policy nexus. With this book we seek to shed more light on the role of increased labour market flexibility and of work-life balance policies for combining family and employment in relation to childbearing choices (intentions, desires) in different fertility and welfare regimes across Europe in the early 21st century. We rely on two key concepts : uncertainty and risk, and incoherence that provide a common platform for the five country studies addressing the tensions young women and couples face making choices about childbearing and paid work in specific institutional contexts.

  • 30.
    Oláh, Livia Sz.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Fratczak, Ewa
    Childbearing, women's employment and work-life balance policies in contemporary Europe2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume addresses the tensions between work and welfare with respect to fertility. Focusing on childbearing choices (intentions, desires) as influential predictors of future fertility, the contributors examine the importance of labour force attachment on young women's fertility plans in the context of increased labour market flexibility and differences in work-life balance policies across Europe in the early 21st century. Both high- and low-fertility societies of different welfare regimes are studied, illuminating processes of uncertainty and risk related to insecure labour force attachment and the incoherence effect in terms of women's and men's equal access to education and employment but unequal share of domestic responsibilities, constraining fertility. The synthesis of the findings shows how childbearing choices in relation to uncertainty, risk and incoherence offer a lens for understanding the capabilities of families to have and care for children in contemporary Europe. This volume contributes to the conceptual development of further research on the complex relationship between fertility, paid work and work-life balance policies.

  • 31.
    Oláh, Livia Sz.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Gähler, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Gender Equality Perceptions, Division of Paid and Unpaid Work, and Partnership Dissolution in Sweden2012Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Oláh, Livia Sz.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hobson, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Carlson, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Synthesis of main findings in the FamiliesAndSocieties project2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This working paper summarizes the main results produced in the large scale collaborative research project FamiliesAndSocieties, financed in the EU Seventh Framework Programme during the period February 2013 – January 2017. Addressing first the growing diversity of family life courses and their main mechanisms of change, the research then focuses on linked lives and interdependencies through the lens of changing gender and intergenerational dependencies. Societal contexts and policies are addressed in highlighting vulnerable groups, issues of recognition and social inclusion, and family-relevant EU and national level policies. A brief discussion on future social risks and policy challenges, and on the implications of the project findings for policy frameworks concludes this report.

  • 33.
    Oláh, Livia Sz
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Raneke, Andreas
    Befolkningsstruktur2017In: Demografi: Befolkningsperspektiv på samhället / [ed] Ann-Zofie Duvander, Jani Turunen, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, p. 155-185Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34. Puur, Allan
    et al.
    Olah, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Tazi-Preve, Mariam Irene
    Dorbritz, Jurgen
    Men's childbearing desires and views of the male role in Europe at the dawn of the 21st century2008In: Demographic Research, Vol. 19, no 56, p. 1883-1912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of modern family patterns of the past decades has been accompanied by substantial changes in social norms, values and gender relations. There is theoretical support for the assumption that the persistence of low fertility levels across Europe is likely to be linked to the incomplete gender revolution, more specifically to the lack of, or only limited changes in the male gender role as opposed to women’s role. In order to have a deeper understanding of the development of fertility, we aim to shed more light on the impact of men’s role orientation on their fertility intentions in this study. Our analyses include men aged 20-44 years in eight countries: Austria, Estonia, East Germany, West Germany, Italy, Lithuania, the Netherlands and Poland. The data are extracted from the Population Policy Acceptance Study of the early 2000s. Examining within-country differences, we find that men with egalitarian attitudes seem to have higher fertility aspirations than their traditional counterparts in contemporary Europe. This is supported by both the descriptive and the multivariate analyses. The picture is somewhat less conclusive though when we focus on country-rankings by intended family size and by the prevalence of egalitarian versus traditional attitudes.

1 - 34 of 34
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