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  • 1. Arrighi, Romanico B G
    et al.
    Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise
    Schwarz, Ralph T
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    The immunogenic properties of protozoan glycosylphosphatidylinositols in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.2009In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 216-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contrast to humans, mosquitoes do not have an adaptive immune response to deal with pathogens, and therefore must rely on their innate immune system to deal with invaders. This facilitates the recognition of different microbes on the basis of surface components or antigens. Such antigens have been identified in various types of microbe such as bacteria and fungi, yet none has been identified in the genus protozoa, which includes pathogens such as the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. This study allowed us to test the antigenic properties of protozoan glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) on the mosquito immune system. We found that both P. falciparum GPI and T. gondii GPI induce the strong expression of several antimicrobial peptides following ingestion, and that as a result of the immune response against the GPIs, the number of eggs produced by the mosquito is reduced dramatically. Such effects have been associated with malaria infected mosquitoes, but never associated with a Plasmodium specific antigen. This study demonstrates that protozoan GPIs can be considered as protozoan specific immune elicitors in mosquitoes, and that P. falciparum GPI plays a critical role in the malaria parasite manipulation of the mosquito vector to facilitate its transmission.

  • 2.
    Arrighi, Romanico B. G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Ebikeme, Charles
    Jiang, Yang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa
    Barrett, Michael P.
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Cell-penetrating peptide TP10 shows broad-spectrum activity against both Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei brucei2008In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 3414-3417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malaria and trypanosomiasis are diseases which afflict millions and for which novel therapies are urgently required. We have tested two well-characterized cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for antiparasitic activity. One CPP, designated TP10, has broad-spectrum antiparasitic activity against Plasmodium falciparum, both blood and mosquito stages, and against blood-stage Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

  • 3. Arrighi, Romanico B. G.
    et al.
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Plasmodium falciparum GPI toxin: A common foe for man and mosquito2010In: Acta Tropica, ISSN 0001-706X, E-ISSN 1873-6254, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 162-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, which can be regarded as an endotoxin, plays a role in the induced pathology associated with severe malaria in humans. However, it is unclear whether the main mosquito vector, Anopheles gambiae, can specifically recognize, and respond to GPI from the malaria parasite. Recent data suggests that the malaria vector does mount a specific response against malaria GPI. In addition, following the strong immune response, mosquito fecundity is severely affected, resulting in a significant reduction in viable eggs produced. In this mini-review we look at the increased interest in understanding the way that malaria antigens are recognized in the mosquito, and how this relates to a better understanding of the interactions between the malaria parasite and both human and vector.

  • 4. Carter, Victoria
    et al.
    Underhill, Ann
    Baber, Ibrahima
    Sylla, Lakamy
    Baby, Mounirou
    Larget-Thiery, Isabelle
    Zettor, Agnès
    Bourgouin, Catherine
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Otvos, Laszlo
    Wade, John D.
    Coulibaly, Mamadou B.
    Traore, Sekou F.
    Tripet, Frederic
    Eggleston, Paul
    Hurd, Hilary
    Killer bee molecules: antimicrobial peptides as effector molecules to target sporogonic stages of Plasmodium2013In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 9, no 11, article id e1003790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new generation of strategies is evolving that aim to block malaria transmission by employing genetically modified vectors or mosquito pathogens or symbionts that express anti-parasite molecules. Whilst transgenic technologies have advanced rapidly, there is still a paucity of effector molecules with potent anti-malaria activity whose expression does not cause detrimental effects on mosquito fitness. Our objective was to examine a wide range of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for their toxic effects on Plasmodium and anopheline mosquitoes. Specifically targeting early sporogonic stages, we initially screened AMPs for toxicity against a mosquito cell line and P. berghei ookinetes. Promising candidate AMPs were fed to mosquitoes to monitor adverse fitness effects, and their efficacy in blocking rodent malaria infection in Anopheles stephensi was assessed. This was followed by tests to determine their activity against P. falciparum in An. gambiae, initially using laboratory cultures to infect mosquitoes, then culminating in preliminary assays in the field using gametocytes and mosquitoes collected from the same area in Mali, West Africa. From a range of 33 molecules, six AMPs able to block Plasmodium development were identified: Anoplin, Duramycin, Mastoparan X, Melittin, TP10 and Vida3. With the exception of Anoplin and Mastoparan X, these AMPs were also toxic to an An. gambiae cell line at a concentration of 25 µM. However, when tested in mosquito blood feeds, they did not reduce mosquito longevity or egg production at concentrations of 50 µM. Peptides effective against cultured ookinetes were less effective when tested in vivo and differences in efficacy against P. berghei and P. falciparum were seen. From the range of molecules tested, the majority of effective AMPs were derived from bee/wasp venoms.

  • 5. Chouaia, Bessem
    et al.
    Rossi, Paolo
    Montagna, Matteo
    Ricci, Irene
    Crotti, Elena
    Damiani, Claudia
    Epis, Sara
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Sagnon, N'Fale
    Alma, Alberto
    Favia, Guido
    Daffonchio, Daniele
    Bandi, Claudio
    Molecular Evidence for Multiple Infections as Revealed by Typing of Asaia Bacterial Symbionts of Four Mosquito Species2010In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 76, no 22, p. 7444-7450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent increased detection of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) of the genus Asaia as symbionts of mosquitoes, such as Anopheles spp. and Aedes spp., prompted us to investigate the diversity of these symbionts and their relationships in different mosquito species and populations. Following cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques, we investigated the microbiota associated with four mosquito species, Anopheles stephensi, Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Aedes albopictus, which are important vectors of human and/or animal pathogens. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene revealed the presence of several bacterial taxa, among which Asaia sequences were among the dominant in most of the samples. A collection of 281 Asaia isolates in cell-free media was established from individuals belonging to the four species. The isolates were typed by internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-PCR, tRNA-PCR, BOX-PCR, and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR, revealing that different Asaia strains are present in different mosquito populations, and even in single individuals.

  • 6. Damiani, Claudia
    et al.
    Ricci, Irene
    Crotti, Elena
    Rossi, Paolo
    Rizzi, Aurora
    Scuppa, Patrizia
    Capone, Aida
    Ulissi, Ulisse
    Epis, Sara
    Genchi, Marco
    Sagnon, N'Fale
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Kang, Angray
    Chouaia, Bessem
    Whitehorn, Cheryl
    Moussa, Guelbeogo W.
    Mandrioli, Mauro
    Esposito, Fulvio
    Sacchi, Luciano
    Bandi, Claudio
    Daffonchio, Daniele
    Favia, Guido
    Mosquito-Bacteria Symbiosis: The Case of Anopheles gambiae and Asaia2010In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 644-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The symbiotic relationship between Asaia, an alpha-proteobacterium belonging to the family Acetobacteriaceae, and mosquitoes has been studied mainly in the Asian malaria vector Anopheles stephensi. Thus, we have investigated the nature of the association between Asaia and the major Afro-tropical malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. We have isolated Asaia from different wild and laboratory reared colonies of A. gambiae, and it was detected by PCR in all the developmental stages of the mosquito and in all the specimens analyzed. Additionally, we have shown that it localizes in the midgut, salivary glands and reproductive organs. Using recombinant strains of Asaia expressing fluorescent proteins, we have demonstrated the ability of the bacterium to colonize A. gambiae mosquitoes with a pattern similar to that described for A. stephensi. Finally, fluorescent in situ hybridization on the reproductive tract of females of A. gambiae showed a concentration of Asaia at the very periphery of the eggs, suggesting that transmission of Asaia from mother to offspring is likely mediated by a mechanism of egg-smearing. We suggest that Asaia has potential for use in the paratransgenic control of malaria transmitted by A. gambiae.

  • 7.
    Emami, S. Noushin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Bo G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hua, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hill, Sharon R.
    Mozuraitis, Raimondas
    Lehmann, Philipp
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Birgersson, Göran
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    Ignell, Rickard
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    A key malaria metabolite modulates vector blood seeking, feeding, and susceptibility to infection2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 355, no 6329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malaria infection renders humans more attractive to Anopheles gambiae sensu lato mosquitoes than uninfected people. The mechanisms remain unknown. We found that an isoprenoid precursor produced by Plasmodium falciparum, (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), affects A. gambiae s. l. blood meal seeking and feeding behaviors as well as susceptibility to infection. HMBPP acts indirectly by triggering human red blood cells to increase the release of CO2, aldehydes, and monoterpenes, which together enhance vector attraction and stimulate vector feeding. When offered in a blood meal, HMBPP modulates neural, antimalarial, and oogenic gene transcription without affecting mosquito survival or fecundity; in a P. falciparum-infected blood meal, sporogony is increased.

  • 8.
    Faye, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Lindberg, Bo G.
    Towards a paradigm shift in innate immunity-seminal work by Hans G. Boman and co-workers2016In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 371, no 1695, article id 20150303Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four decades ago, immunological research was dominated by the field of lymphoid biology. It was commonly accepted that multicellular eukaryotes defend themselves through phagocytosis. The lack of lymphoid cells in insects and other simpler animals, however, led to the common notion that they might simply lack the capacity defend themselves with humoral factors. This view was challenged by microbiologist Hans G. Boman and co-workers in a series of publications that led to the advent of antimicrobial peptides as a universal arm of the immune system. Besides ingenious research, Boman ignited his work by posing the right questions. He started off by asking himself a simple question: 'Antibodies take weeks to produce while many microbes divide hourly; so how come we stay healthy?'. This led to two key findings in the field: the discovery of an inducible and highly potent antimicrobial immune response in Drosophila in 1972, followed by the characterization of cecropin in 1981. Despite broadly being considered an insect-specific response at first, the work of Boman and co-workers eventually created a bandwagon effect that unravelled various aspects of innate immunity. This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'.

  • 9. Kaempfer, Peter
    et al.
    Matthews, Holly
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Glaeser, Stefanie P.
    Martin, Karin
    Lodders, Nicole
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Elizabethkingia anophelis sp nov., isolated from the midgut of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae2011In: International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, ISSN 1466-5026, E-ISSN 1466-5034, Vol. 61, p. 2670-2675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The taxonomic position, growth characteristics and antibiotic resistance properties of a slightly yellow-pigmented bacterial strain, designated R26(T), isolated from the midgut of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, were studied. The isolate produced rod-shaped cells, which stained Gram-negative. The bacterium had two growth optima at 30-31 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Strain R26(T) demonstrated natural antibiotic resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin and tetracycline. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate showed 98.6% sequence similarity to that of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica ATCC 13253(T) and 98.2 % similarity to that of Elizabethkingia miricola GTC 862(T). The major fatty acids of strain R26(T) were iso-C(15:0), iso-C(17:0) 3-OH and summed feature 4 (iso-C(15:0) 2-OH and/or C(16:1)omega 7c/t. Strain R26(T) contained only menaquinone MK-6 and showed a complex polar lipid profile consisting of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, an unknown phospholipid and unknown polar lipids and glycolipids. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments with E. meningoseptica CCUG 214(T) (=ATCC 13253(T)) and E. miricola KCTC 12492(T) (=GTC 862(T)) gave relatedness values of 34.5 % (reciprocal 41.5 %) and 35.0 % (reciprocal 25.7 %), respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization results and some differentiating biochemical properties indicate that strain R26T represents a novel species, for which the name Elizabethkingia anophelis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is R26(T) (=CCUG 60038(T) =CCM 7804(T)).

  • 10. Kukutla, Phanidhar
    et al.
    Lindberg, Bo G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Pei, Dong
    Rayl, Melanie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Yu, Wanqin
    Steritz, Matthew
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Xu, Jiannong
    Draft Genome Sequences of Elizabethkingia anophelis Strains R26T and Ag1 from the Midgut of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae2013In: Genome Announcements, ISSN 2169-8287, Vol. 1, no 6, p. e01030-13-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elizabethkingia anophelis is a species in the family Flavobacteriaceae. It is a dominant resident in the mosquito gut and also a human pathogen. We present the draft genome sequences of two strains of E. anophelis, R26T and Ag1, which were isolated from the midgut of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

  • 11. Kukutla, Phanidhar
    et al.
    Lindberg, Bo G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Pei, Dong
    Rayl, Melanie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Yu, Wanqin
    Steritz, Matthew
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Xu, Jiannong
    Insights from the Genome Annotation of Elizabethkingia anophelis from the Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e97715-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elizabethkingia anophelis is a dominant bacterial species in the gut ecosystem of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae. We recently sequenced the genomes of two strains of E. anophelis, R26(T) and Ag1, isolated from different strains of A. gambiae. The two bacterial strains are identical with a few exceptions. Phylogenetically, Elizabethkingia is closer to Chryseobacterium and Riemerella than to Flavobacterium. In line with other Bacteroidetes known to utilize various polymers in their ecological niches, the E. anophelis genome contains numerous TonB dependent transporters with various substrate specificities. In addition, several genes belonging to the polysaccharide utilization system and the glycoside hydrolase family were identified that could potentially be of benefit for the mosquito carbohydrate metabolism. In agreement with previous reports of broad antibiotic resistance in E. anophelis, a large number of genes encoding efflux pumps and blactamases are present in the genome. The component genes of resistance-nodulation-division type efflux pumps were found to be syntenic and conserved in different taxa of Bacteroidetes. The bacterium also displays hemolytic activity and encodes several hemolysins that may participate in the digestion of erythrocytes in the mosquito gut. At the same time, the OxyR regulon and antioxidant genes could provide defense against the oxidative stress that is associated with blood digestion. The genome annotation and comparative genomic analysis revealed functional characteristics associated with the symbiotic relationship with the mosquito host.

  • 12.
    Lindberg, Bo G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Merritt, Eleanor A.
    Rayl, Melanie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Liu, Chenxiao
    Parmryd, Ingela
    Olofsson, Berit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Immunogenic and Antioxidant Effects of a Pathogen-Associated Prenyl Pyrophosphate in Anopheles gambiae2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 8, p. e73868-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite efficient vector transmission, Plasmodium parasites suffer great bottlenecks during their developmental stages within Anopheles mosquitoes. The outcome depends on a complex three-way interaction between host, parasite and gut bacteria. Although considerable progress has been made recently in deciphering Anopheles effector responses, little is currently known regarding the underlying microbial immune elicitors. An interesting candidate in this sense is the pathogen-derived prenyl pyrophosphate and designated phosphoantigen (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), found in Plasmodium and most eubacteria but not in higher eukaryotes. HMBPP is the most potent stimulant known of human V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells, a unique lymphocyte subset that expands during several infections including malaria. In this study, we show that V(Y)9V delta 2 T cells proliferate when stimulated with supernatants from intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum cultures, suggesting that biologically relevant doses of phosphoantigens are excreted by the parasite. Next, we used Anopheles gambiae to investigate the immune-and redox-stimulating effects of HMBPP. We demonstrate a potent activation in vitro of all but one of the signaling pathways earlier implicated in the human V(Y)9V delta 2 T cell response, as p38, JNK and PI3K/Akt but not ERK were activated in the A. gambiae 4a3B cell line. Additionally, both HMBPP and the downstream endogenous metabolite isopentenyl pyrophosphate displayed antioxidant effects by promoting cellular tolerance to hydrogen peroxide challenge. When provided in the mosquito blood meal, HMBPP induced temporal changes in the expression of several immune genes. In contrast to meso-diaminopimelic acid containing peptidoglycan, HMBPP induced expression of dual oxidase and nitric oxide synthase, two key determinants of Plasmodium infection. Furthermore, temporal fluctuations in midgut bacterial numbers were observed. The multifaceted effects observed in this study indicates that HMBPP is an important elicitor in common for both Plasmodium and gut bacteria in the mosquito.

  • 13.
    Lindh, J. M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Borg-Karlson, A. -K
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Transstadial and horizontal transfer of bacteria within a colony of Anopheles gambiae (DipteraCulicidae) and oviposition response to bacteria-containing water:  2008In: Acta Tropica, ISSN 0001-706X, E-ISSN 1873-6254, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 242-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a paratransgenic approach, genetically modified bacteria are utilized to kill the parasite in the vector gut. A critical component for paratransgenics against malaria is how transgenic bacteria can be introduced and then kept in a mosquito population. Here, we investigated transstadial and horizontal transfer of bacteria within an Anopheles gambiae mosquito colony with the focus on spiked breeding sites as a possible means of introducing bacteria to mosquitoes. A Pantoea stewartii strain, previously isolated from An. gambiae, marked with a green fluorescent protein (GFP), was introduced to mosquitoes in different life stages. The following life stages or older mosquitoes in the case of adults were screened for bacteria in their guts. In addition to P. stewartii other bacteria were isolated from the guts: these were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis and temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). Bacteria were transferred from larvae to pupae but not from pupae to adults. The mosquitoes were able to take up bacteria from the water they emerged from and transfer the same bacteria to the water they laid eggs in. Eliza-bethkingia meningoseptica was more often isolated from adult mosquitoes than P. stewartii. A bioassay was used to examine An. gambiae oviposition responses towards bacteria-containing solutions. The volatiles emitted from the solutions were sampled by headspace-solid phase microextraction (SPME) and identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. P. stewartii but not E. meningoseptica mediated a positive oviposition response. The volatiles emitted by P stewartii include indole and 3-methyl-1 -butanol, which previously have been shown to affect An. gambiae mosquito behaviour. E. meningoseptica emitted indole but not 3-methyl-1 -butanol, when suspended in saline. Taken together, this indicates that it may be possible to create attractive breeding sites for distribution of genetically modified bacteria in the field in a paratransgenic approach against malaria. Further research is needed to determine if the bacteria are also transferred in the same way in nature.

  • 14.
    Lindh, J. M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Kannaste, A.
    Knols, B. G. J.
    Faye, I.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Borg-Karlson, A. -K
    Oviposition Responses of Anopheles gambiae s.s. (Diptera Culicidae) and Identification of Volatiles from Bacteria-Containing Solutions:  2008In: Journal of medical entomology, ISSN 0022-2585, E-ISSN 1938-2928, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1039-1049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a dual-choice oviposition bioassay was used to screen responses of gravid An. gambiae toward 17 bacterial species, previously isolated from Anopheles gambiae s.l. (Diptera: Culicidae) midguts or oviposition sites. The 10 isolates from oviposition sites have been identified by phylogenetic analyses of their 16S rRNA genes. Eight of the 10 isolates were gram-positive, out of which six belonged to the Bacilli class. Solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to identify the volatiles emitted From the bacterial isolates, Aromatic and aliphatic alcohols, aliphatic ketones, alkylpyrazines, dimethyl oligosulfides, and indole were among the chemical compounds identified from the headspace above bacteria-containing saline. The mosquitoes laid significantly more eggs in six of the bacteria-containing solutions compared with the sterile solution. These six bacteria did not emit any compounds in common that could explain the positive oviposition response. Instead. the bacteria were grouped according to principal component analysis (PCA) based on the relative amouts of volatile emitted. The PCA-plots facilitated the identification of 13 putative oviposition attractants for An. gambiae mosquitoes.

  • 15. Liu, Chenxiao
    et al.
    Emami, S. Noushin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Pettersson, Jean
    Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Parmryd, Ingela
    V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells proliferate in response to phosphoantigens released from erythrocytes infected with asexual and gametocyte stage Plasmodium falciparum2018In: Cellular Immunology, ISSN 0008-8749, E-ISSN 1090-2163, Vol. 334, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells, the dominant gamma delta T cell subset in human peripheral blood, are stimulated by phosphoantigens, of which (E)-4-Hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate, is produced in the apicoplast of malaria parasites. Cell-free media from synchronised Plasmodium falciparum asexual ring, trophozoite, and schizont stage-cultures of high purity as well as media from ruptured schizont cultures, all stimulated V gamma 9V delta 2 T cell proliferation, as did media from pure gametocyte cultures, whereas media from uninfected erythrocytes cultures did not. The media from ruptured schizont cultures and all the asexual and gametocyte stage cultures contained only background iron levels, suggesting that all erythrocyte haemoglobin is consumed as the parasites develop and supporting that the phosphoantigens were released from intact parasitized erythrocytes. The V gamma 9V delta 2 T cell-stimulating agent was not affected by freezing, thawing or heating but was sensitive to phosphatase treatment, confirming its phosphoantigen identity. In summary, phosphoantigens are released from parasitised erythrocytes at all developmental blood stages.

  • 16. Pütsep, K
    et al.
    Faye, I
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Hans G Boman (1924-2008): pioneer in peptide-mediated innate immune defence.2009In: Scandinavian journal of immunology, ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 317-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Roxström-Lindquist, K
    et al.
    Lindström-Dinnetz, I
    Olesen, J
    Engström, Y
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biology and Functional Genomics.
    Faye, I
    An intron enhancer activates the immunoglobulin-related Hemolin gene in Hyalophora cecropia2002In: Insect Molecular Biology, ISSN 09621075, Vol. 11, p. 505-515Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Schmidt, Otto
    et al.
    Söderhäll, Kenneth
    Theopold, Ulrich
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biology and Functional Genomics.
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    The Role of Adhesion in Arthropod Immune Recognition2010In: Annual review of entomology, ISSN 1545-2948, Vol. 55, p. 485-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recognition and inactivation of toxins and pathogens are mediated by a combination of cell-free and cellular mechanisms. A number of soluble and membrane-bound pattern recognition molecules interact with elicitors to become involved in both cell-free inactivation as well as cellular uptake reactions. Here we describe the possible recognition and effector function of key arthropod immune proteins, such as peroxinectin, hemolin, and hemomucin, as an outcome of changes in adhesiveness, which drive self-assembly reactions leading to cell-free coagulation and cellular uptake reactions. The fact that some of these proteins are essential for immune and developmental functions in some species, but not found in closely related species, may point to the existence of multiprotein assemblies, which are conserved at the mechanistic level and can function with more than one combination of protein constituents. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Entomology Volume 55 is December 03, 2009. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates.

  • 19.
    Terenius, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Bettencourt, Raul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Lee, So Young
    Li, Wenli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Soderhall, Kenneth
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    RNA interference of Hemolin causes depletion of phenoloxidase activity in Hyalophora cecropia2007In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 571-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanization is regulated by the prophenoloxidase cascade and functions as a response to intruding microorganisms in invertebrates. When injecting dsRNA of the lepidopteran immune protein hemolin in pupae of Hyalophora cecropia (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae), we observed a significant reduction in phenoloxidase activity after 24 h, but not after 72 h. The link between hemolin and the prophenoloxidase system suggests that hemolin is a pattern recognition protein important for the triggering of the prophenoloxidase cascade in the defence against bacterial infections. 

  • 20.
    Terenius, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Lindh, Jenny M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Eriksson-Gonzales, Karolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Bussiere, Luc
    Laugen, Ane T.
    Bergquist, Helen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Titanji, Kehmia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Midgut bacterial dynamics in aedes aegypti2012In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 556-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In vector mosquitoes, the presence of midgut bacteria may affect the ability to transmit pathogens. We have used a laboratory colony of Aedes aegypti as a model for bacterial interspecies competition and show that after a blood meal, the number of species (culturable on LuriaBertani agar) that coexist in the midgut is low and that about 40% of the females do not harbor any cultivable bacteria. We isolated species belonging to the genera Bacillus, Elizabethkingia, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Serratia, and Sphingomonas, and we also determined their growth rates, antibiotic resistance, and ex vivo inhibition of each other. To investigate the possible existence of coadaptation between midgut bacteria and their host, we fed Ae.similar to aegypti cohorts with gut bacteria from human, a frog, and two mosquito species and followed the bacterial population growth over time. The dynamics of the different species suggests coadaptation between host and bacteria, and interestingly, we found that Pantoea stewartii isolated from Ae.similar to aegypti survive better in Ae.similar to aegypti as compared to P.similar to stewartii isolated from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

  • 21. Terenius, Olle
    et al.
    Papanicolaou, Alexie
    Garbutt, Jennie S.
    Eleftherianos, Ioannis
    Huvenne, Hanneke
    Kanginakudru, Sriramana
    Albrechtsen, Merete
    An, Chunju
    Aymeric, Jean-Luc
    Barthel, Andrea
    Bebas, Piotr
    Bitra, Kavita
    Bravo, Alejandra
    Chevalier, François
    Collinge, Derek P.
    Crava, Cristina M.
    de Maagd, Ruud A.
    Duvic, Bernard
    Erlandson, Martin
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Felföldi, Gabriella
    Fujiwara, Haruhiko
    Futahashi, Ryo
    Gandhe, Archana S.
    Gatehouse, Heather S.
    Gatehouse, Laurence N.
    Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.
    Gómez, Isabel
    Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.
    Groot, Astrid T.
    Hauser, Frank
    Heckel, David G.
    Hegedus, Dwayne D.
    Hrycaj, Steven
    Huang, Lihua
    Hull, J. Joe
    Iatrou, Kostas
    Iga, Masatoshi
    Kanost, Michael R.
    Kotwica, Joanna
    Li, Changyou
    Li, Jianghong
    Liu, Jisheng
    Lundmark, Magnus
    Matsumoto, Shogo
    Meyering-Vos, Martina
    Millichap, Peter J.
    Monteiro, Antónia
    Mrinal, Nirotpal
    Niimi, Teruyuki
    Nowara, Daniela
    Ohnishi, Atsushi
    Oostra, Vicencio
    Ozaki, Katsuhisa
    Papakonstantinou, Maria
    Popadic, Aleksandar
    Rajam, Manchikatla V.
    Saenko, Suzanne
    Simpson, Robert M.
    Soberón, Mario
    Strand, Michael R.
    Tomita, Shuichiro
    Toprak, Umut
    Wang, Ping
    Wee, Choon Wei
    Whyard, Steven
    Zhang, Wenqing
    Nagaraju, Javaregowda
    Ffrench-Constant, Richard H.
    Herrero, Salvador
    Gordon, Karl
    Swevers, Luc
    Smagghe, Guy
    RNA interference in Lepidoptera: An overview of successful and unsuccessful studies and implications for experimental design2011In: Journal of insect physiology, ISSN 0022-1910, E-ISSN 1879-1611, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 231-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive experiments have not been collected in such a way that they are possible to analyze. In this review, we have collected detailed data from more than 150 experiments including all to date published and many unpublished experiments. Despite a large variation in the data, trends that are found are that RNAi is particularly successful in the family Saturniidae and in genes involved in immunity. On the contrary, gene expression in epidermal tissues seems to be most difficult to silence. In addition, gene silencing by feeding dsRNA requires high concentrations for success. Possible causes for the variability of success in RNAi experiments in Lepidoptera are discussed. The review also points to a need to further investigate the mechanism of RNAi in lepidopteran insects and its possible connection to the innate immune response. Our general understanding of RNAi in Lepidoptera will be further aided in the future as our public database at http://insectacentral.org/RNAi will continue to gather information on RNAi experiments.

1 - 21 of 21
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