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  • 1.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fahlander, FredrikStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.Sjöstrand, YlvaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pictorial and visual elements are special types of archaeological data that transgress boundaries: between us and the past and between the material and immaterial. Traditionally, images have been discussed in terms of what they represent, mean or symbolize. In this volume, the authors explore other ways in which images aect and engage the beholder and the modes in which they are entangled in past worlds. The articles comprise examples from various regions and time periods and include a diverse array of topics including northern European rock art of the Neolithic and Bronze Age, anthropomorphic aspects of ceramic pots and figures in gold, erotic themes on children’s burial vessels, and nineteenth-century rock art created by quarantined sailors in Australia.

  • 2.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sjöstrand, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Imagery beyond Representation2012In: Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Fredrik Fahlander, Ylva Sjöstrand, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, 1-12 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Are we there yet? Archaeology and the postmodern in the new millennium2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, 109-129 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present text discusses the significance of the postmodern condition in contemporary archaeology. Five themes associated with postmodernism are discussed (a) the relativization of truth, knowledge, and meaning, (b) the fragmentation of the grand narrative, (c) the relation between agency and discourse, (d) pluralism, multivocality, and heterogeneity, and (e) rhetoric and styles of writing. In contemporary debate it has been suggested that postmodernism is a past phase and that these contested issues have become less important. It is, however, argued here that these are by no means resolved, but rather bypassed by shifting focus to archaeology as a contemporary practice or, in theoretical terms, towards particularistic neo-materialist ontologies.

  • 4.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Articulating hybridity. Structurating Situations and Indexical Events in North-European Rock Art2012In: Matters of scale: processes and courses of events in the past and the present / PAG-Postdoctoral archaeological group / [ed] N. M. Burström & F. Fahlander, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, 53-73 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Articulating Relations: A non-representational view of Scandinavian Rock-art2013In: Archaeology after Interpretation: Returning Materials to Archaeological Theory / [ed] B. Alberti, B., Jones, A. & Pollard, J. (Eds), Left Coast Press Inc., 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses the prospects of a non-representational perspective on south Scandinavian rock art. The emphasis on relations between the production of petroglyphs and their material basis offers a different view on the practice than interpretative and representational methodologies based on context, typology, and stylistic attributes. The petroglyphs are perceived as ‘material articulations’, which emphasise their entanglement in past worlds rather than simply representing or reflecting them. By stressing the potential aesthetic affects of the images instead of viewing them as narrative or representational compositions, it is argued that especially the iconic ‘boat figure’ is nested in various sets of relationships. The making of petroglyphs in south Scandinavia during the Early Bronze Age were an active part in a series of material relations connecting the sea and land, the human and the material, farming and hunting, past and present as well as different places.

  • 6.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Articulating stone. The material practice of petroglyphing2012In: Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations / [ed] I.-M. Back Danielsson, F. Fahlander & Y. Sjöstrand (Eds), Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, 97-116 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present text elaborates on the material and processual aspects of making petroglyphs during the early Bronze Age in Northern Europe. The focus is set on the relations between materiality and the ‘chaîne opératoire’ rather than in terms of representation, symbolisation or style. It is argued that patchworks, unfinished motifs, re-cuts and hybrids are more interesting ways to understand the complex relations between the social and the ritual aspects of petroglyphing. The approach is illustrated by a horizontal stratigraphy of the Hemsta panel in the parish of Uppland, in southern Sweden. Here a sequence of at least three separate phases of activity is distinguished. The study emphasizes the changing importance of space, depth and size in the process of making and arranging the motifs – suggesting that the development is a part of a social and ritual turbulence resembling the process of hybridity. 

  • 7.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Bilder av barn och barndom2011In: Spåren av de små. Arkeologiska perspektiv på barn och barndom / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander, Stockholm: Univ. , 2011, 1-75 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Djur och människor: posthumanistiska perspektiv på yngre järnålderns gravar2014In: Med hjärta och hjärna: en vänbok till Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh / [ed] Henrik Alexandersson, Alexander Andreeff & Annika Bünz (red), Göteborg: Univ. , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Evolution eller intentionell design: Kommentarer till Petter Snekkestad, Darwinistisk arkeologi2011In: Primitive tider, ISSN 1501-0430, Vol. 13, 167-170 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Facing gender. Corporeality, materiality, intersectionality and resurrection2012In: To Tender Gender: The Pasts and Futures of Gender Research / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson & Susanne Thedéen, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, 137-152 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This text discusses some recent trends within gender research with a special concern for their possibilities for archaeological application. It is argued that the linguistic constructionist perspective, or third wave/postmodern feminism, fits the archaeological realities poorly. Instead, a neomaterialist standpoint in combination with an intersectional perspective is advocated. However, since such an approach departs from the study of active agents, an archaeological application needs to some extent to ‘resurrect’ the dead. Thus, methodological aspects are discussed in relation to new advances within forensic anthropology in order to extend the amount of personal in- formation that can be derived from the bones and associated materialities. 

  • 11.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Intersecting Generations: Burying the Old in a Neolithic Hunter-Fisher Community2013In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0959-7743, E-ISSN 1474-0540, Vol. 23, no 2, 227-239 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the potential of studying the social dimensions of old age and aged bodies in the past. Because old age is relative to life-expectancy figures, diet and lifestyle, calendric years are avoided when defining old age. Instead a composite approach is advocated that includes, for example, traces of wear and joint diseases to identify a threshold between adulthood and a period of seniority. The approach is applied to the Middle Neolithic burial ground Ajvide on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. Eleven individuals (six men, five women, or 18 per cent of the 62 analysed burials) are regarded as ‘aged bodies’. At Ajvide a majority of these individuals are buried in graves that overlap earlier burials containing younger individuals of the same sex. It is argued that this pattern is due to eschatological ideas of ‘generational merging’ of bodies. This practice changes over time, which is suggested to be a part of the overall hybridization processes at the site. 

  • 12.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kommentar till Kristine Orestad Sørgaard: ‘den ontologiske vendingen i arkeologien’2015In: In situ archaeologica, ISSN 2000-4044, 112-115 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Livet efter döden: Hanteringen av döda2009In: Döda personers sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck / [ed] I-M. Back Danielsson, I. Gustin, A. Larsson, N. Myrberg & S. Thedéen, Stockholm: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Stockholms universitet , 2009, 35-55 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present text concerns theoretical and methodological aspects of burial archaeology with special attention given to the temporal dimension. It is argued that burial places need to be discussed individually from a bottom-up perspective in order to minimise the bias of regional and culture-centred generalisations. Such a microarchaeological approach focuses on social practice involved in the disposal of the dead as a mediating level between the local and particular on one hand and the normative and general on the other. Further, it is argued that the horizontal stratigraphy of burial places needs to be investigated in order to distinguish phases of change and alteration within sites. Such phases constitute more relevant points of departure for comparisons with phases of other sites, thus facilitating a more nuanced discussion on periods of contact and hybridisation between different social groups.

  • 14.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Magiska tatueringar2014In: Sjömanstatueringar / [ed] Mirja Arnshav [och elva andra], Stockholm: Medströms Bokförlag , 2014, 166-175 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Materiella bilder: Visuella uttryck bland Mälarvikens hällbilder2017In: New perspectives on the Bronze Age: proceedings of the 13th Nordic Bronze Age Symposium held in Gothenburg 9th to 13th June 2015 / [ed] Sophie Bergerbrant, Anna Wessman, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2017, 263-276 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present text discusses Bronze Age rock art as an active and integrated materiality, entangled in social relations rather than be- ing a passive reflection of ideology or cosmology. A key tenet is that rock art imagery has the potential to incite actions and to affect the course of events. The main focus of the study is set on rock art along the former shoreline of the Mälaren bay in eastern central Sweden. This area comprises one of the most varied and dense clusters of Bronze Age rock art in southern Scandinavia, situated on the northern perimeter of the core area of the southern tradition. The in-between location between the northern and southern traditions of rock art implies a wider social context to the development in the area. It is suggested that the imagery emerged in concert with the shifting relations between the maritime-oriented individuals and groups of varying traditions and life-styles that moved about in the Mälaren bay. By emphasising social complexity and hybridisation, processes in which rock art took part, it is possible to bypass some of the binary thinking that has plagued rock-art research (e.g. real/imaginary, mobile/sedentary, Bronze Age/Neolithic, ritual/social). In this perspective, the imagery is also allowed to contribute to our understanding of this period in- stead of merely reflecting our pre-understandings of the Bronze Age in general. In order to discuss potential agentive aspects of rock art, the traditional iconographic perspective of imagery as vehicles for meaning or symbolism is displaced in favour of a greater concern with what imagery in its material form actually does. The study departs from a relational ontology that focuses on the material aspects of the production, visual culture and how sites and panels progress over time. In this perspective, rock art is thus not only considered a representation of reality, but as ‘material articula- tions’ — something between materiality and practice. Instead of agency, the animacy of the imagery is emphasised, inspired by a perspectivist line of thought. It is argued that the sympathetic and apotropaic magic of the rock art over time came to encompass other, unintended effects, due to the hybrid social developments in the Mälaren bay area. In order to circumvent the interpretative dilemma of symbolic polysemy, the rock art is analysed in terms of visual modes of material articulation. This means identifying and studying different manners of visual expression, the different ways in which images are produced and how they relate to other motifs, breaking against praxis, and in general, recognising how motifs by a special design, or set in a particular context, may incite further engagements. Such instances are examined with the aid of horizontal stratigraphy, supported by three-dimensional digital technique, in order to follow e.g. displacements in stylistic variability, alterations, re-cuts, superimpositions and how the motifs relate to the texture of the rock. Three examples of different visual modes are discussed: size and depth of motifs, ‘incomplete’ motifs and the practice of stacking motifs in columns. It is suggested that some of the seemingly incomplete or unfinished motifs actually may have been deliberately made vague and diffuse in order to encourage subsequent actions and reflection among the beholders. By sequencing the progression of two panels containing stacked motifs (Boglösa 73 and 131), it is also argued that the traditional arrangement has been disrupted and tampered with, which indicates that the visual expressions in the research area cannot be attributed to one single group, one culture or one cosmology. On the contrary, the study suggests that the imagery of the rock panels probably would have been developed in a ‘dialogue’ between different individuals or groups. The study also demonstrates how a few pecked motifs, intentionally or not, initiated a process of making more rock art in the area, which also illustrates how images can indeed both instigate action and be integrated actants in social process.

  • 16.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Mellanneolitisk ålderdom: Sociala aspekter av livscykelns sista faser2012In: In Situ. Västsvensk arkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-4964, Vol. 2011/2012, 7-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The text explores the potential of studying the social dimensions of old age and ageing in the past. It is argued that classification in calendric years is less useful for archaeological studies of old age. Instead, a composite ap- proach is advocated that focuses on the ageing body, based on case-specific identifiable traces of old age. The proposed approach is applied on a case study of the middle Neolithic burial ground Ajvide on the island of Gotland. Among the 62 published burials, twelve individuals reached an age of around 50–70 years, all showing osteological traces of old age. There are no signi- ficant differences between these and other graves in terms of interments, number of artefact types or burial construction. However, all but one of the six cases where graves overlap earlier graves contain individuals of advanced age. This suggests that old age indeed was recognized as a distinct category at Ajvide during the middle Neolithic. 

  • 17.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Mesolithic Childhoods: Growing up and dying as a hunter-fisher in South Scandinavia2012In: Childhood in the Past: An International Journal, ISSN 1758-5716, E-ISSN 2040-8528, Vol. 5, 20-34 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper stresses the importance of distinguishing between different categories of children in order to better understand their changing lives and their shifting relations with the adult world. The example is taken from the Mesolithic burial/settlement site of Skateholm at the southernmost coast of Sweden. By contrasting grave content and spatial arrangement of the site it is argued that the inhabitants recognised differences between infants (<1 year), younger children up to seven years, and older children between about eight to thirteen years. The children seem to have started to engage in the adult world by the age of seven or eight, and by the age of around fourteen years, their graves are inseparable from those of the adults. Individuals of the intermediate age-group, between the ages nine to thirteen, are completely missing among the burials. It is suggested that their absence is not singularly due to lower mortality rate, but rather that this age-span constituted a socially distinct transitional phase between childhood and adulthood. 

  • 18.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Mesolitisk barndom. Att vara liten på Skateholm2011In: Spåren av de små. Arkeologiska perspektiv på barn och barndom / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander, Stockholm: Univ. , 2011, 181-197 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Messing with the Dead. Post-depositional Manipulations of Burials and Bodies in the South Scandinavian Stone Age2010In: Documenta Praehistorica, ISSN 1408-967X, Vol. 39, 22-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns post-depositional manipulations of burials at two Stone Age sites in Southern Sweden: the Late Mesolithic Skateholm and Middle Neolithic Ajvide. A distinction is made between non-aggressive and aggressive manipulations of graves and dead bodies. Fine-grained hori- zontal stratigraphies make it possible to associate each category with different phases of occupation. It is suggested that aggressive manipulations are generally the result of social stress during periods of hybridisation between different groups and traditions.

     

  • 20.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Ontology matters in archaeology and anthropology: People, things and posthumanism2017In: These "thin partitions": bridging the growing divide between cultural anthropology and archaeology / [ed] Joshua D. Englehardt, Ivy A. Rieger, Boulder: University Press of Colorado , 2017, 69-86 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Postmodern Archaeologies2014In: The Oxford Handbook of Archaeological Theory / [ed] Andrew Gardner, Mark Lake and Ulrike Sommer, Oxford University Press , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is intended to outline the main postmodern theoretical influences in archaeology. Although it may be difficult to identify a distinct postmodern strand of archaeology, it is apparent that there are trends and issues within archaeological theory that are clearly influenced by postmodern lines of thought. One example is the issue of relativity of ‘facts’ and historicity of interpretations stressed by many post-processual archaeologists. This ambivalence regarding archaeological data has for some led to a loss of faith in archaeology’s abilities to say something definitive about the past. For others, it has initiated critical discussions of how, and under what conditions, narratives of the past are produced. For instance, there has been an increasing concern with ethical issues and the political use of archaeology (e.g. heritage management, local and indigenous archaeologies, the repatriation of objects and human remains). Archaeology in the postmodern condition is thus principally characterized by increasing diversity in subject areas and theory, but also by a broader definition of the discipline and its roles in contemporary society.

  • 22.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Reala kroppar och dödens realitet: Rumslighet och horisontell stratigrafi på Ajvide och Skateholm2009In: I tillvarons gränsland: perspektiv på kroppen mellan liv och död / [ed] Ekengren, F. & Nilsson Stutz, L., Lund: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens historia, Lunds universitet , 2009, 106-145 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Slavoj Zizek har föreslagit som experiment att man under kärleksakten skulle tänka på sin partners reala materialitet, dvs vad kroppens tunna biologiska skal döljer i form av blod, slem, tarmar och ben, och sedan försöka fortsätta med akten. Zizeks poäng här är att illustrera Jacques Lacans Imaginära, Reala och Symboliska dimensioner; kroppen som vi vanligtvis (vill) se den är i hög grad en Imaginär och Symbolisk omskrivning av sin Reala materialitet. Sådana omskrivningar är dock inte allmänmänskligt givna, relationerna mellan det imaginära, symboliska och Reala varierar mellan olika kollektiv över tid och rum; vi kan mao faktiskt tänka oss att någonstans någongång kopulerar två biologiska enheter av blod, kött och slem med varandra utan att bekymras av sin reala konstitution.

    Naturligtvis är även döden något Realt och dess oundviklighet tenderar även den att omskrivas eller tom förträngas för att göra den acceptabel och fattbar. Synen på kroppen är i högsta grad kopplad till de praktiker som är knutna till döden och döda kroppar; de kan analyseras för att diskutera synen på det döda (och tillika livet i viss grad). Med utgångspunkt i dessa kroppens och dödens Realiteter diskuteras hanteringen av döda kroppar (människor såväl som djur) under mesolitikum och neolitikum utifrån gravfälten i Ajvide och Skateholm.

  • 23.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Recension av Åsa Berggrens avhandling 'Med kärret som källa. Om begreppen offer och ritual inom arkeologin'2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, 228-230 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sherlock against Lestrade: A study in scale2013In: Counterpoint: Essays in Archaeology and Heritage Studies in Honour of Professor Kristian Kristiansen / [ed] S. Bergerbrant & S. Sabatini, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2013, 637- p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is commonly argued that if you study societies on the small scale level you tend to emphasise particularities and may fail to realise the importance of outside events for local development. The grand scenario, on the other hand, often tends to reduce social complexity in favour of deterministic and simple explanations as a driving force for particular events. This text stresses that no matter what preferences one might have concerning level of scale, going deeper into details is generally a rewarding and when using a bottom-up perspective, detailed small scale analysis may turn out to be as informative on the general level, as they may be on the particular.

  • 25.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Skillnadens dimensioner. Storlek och materialitet i hällbildspraktik2013In: Primitive tider, ISSN 1501-0430, Vol. 15, 7-20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to discuss displacements in size and materiality as an option to stylistic and typological approaches in archaeology. Although displacements in dimensions often have a practical and functional background, the cumulative result of such shifts often have unforeseen and unintended effects which may result in new forms and material constellations. In this sense, relations between the material and size constitute a platform that partially bypasses relativism and one-dimensional links between materiality and ideology that often are the case of interpretative and representational methodologies. As an alternative, a non-representational and relational approach is explored. It is illustrated by two examples concerning rock art of the Late Neolithic – Early Bronze Age in northern Europe. The petroglyphs are perceived as ‘material articulations’ that are not simply representing or reflecting past worlds – but are integrated parts of them. By stressing displacements in dimensions it is apparent that the petroglyphs are part of relations that transgress cultural and regional contexts. 

  • 26.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Spåren av de små: arkeologiska perspektiv på barn och barndom2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Från att länge ha varit en försummad kategori i arkeologi och historia böjar nu barn och barndomsstudier bli ett etablerat forskningsfält. Föreliggande antologi har ambitionen att ta ett samlat grepp över var forskningen står idag och med olika fallstudier visa på dessa studiers potential att säga oss något nytt och intressant om förmoderna samhällen. Antologin inleds med en bakgrund till forskningen kring barn och barndom, dess definitionsproblem och centrala begrepp. Den andra delen av boken består av ett antal fallstudier av arkeologer, osteologer och antikvetare vars exempel spänner från mesolitisk till historisk tid.

  • 27.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Subadult or subaltern? Children as serial categories2011In: (Re)Thinking the Little Ancestor: New Perspectives on the Archaeology of Infancy and Childhood / [ed] Mike Lally & Alison Moore., Oxford: Archaeopress , 2011, 14-23 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The materiality of the ancient dead: Post-burial practices and ontologies of death in southern sweden AD 800–12002016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, 137-162 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This text discusses reuse and modications of older graves in southern Sweden during the Late Iron Age and early medieval period (c. 9th to 12th centuries AD). Post-burial practices in the Late Iron Age have in general been interpreted as means to negotiate status, identity and rights to land, while in the later part of the period they are comprehended as expressions of religious insecurity and syncretism. In this text, the continuity of post-burial practices during the whole period is stressed and instead of general top-down interpretative models, the ontological status and material aspects of death, dead bodies and their graves is emphasized. It is argued that the post-burial actions generally constituted ways of relating to a specific type of materiality, the bones of the ancient dead, which transgress binary categorizations such as living–dead, past–present, heathen–Christian, and human–nonhuman. The argument builds on recently excavated sites in southern Sweden: Bogla, Broby Bro, Lilla Ullevi, Valsta and Vittene.

  • 29.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The Nose, the Eye, the Mouth and the Gut: Social Dimensions of Food-Cravings and Commensality2010In: Making Sense of Things: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander & Anna Kjellström, Stockholm: Univ. , 2010, 200, 35-50 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In archaeology, the discussion concerning food and ingestion has primarily focused on diet, i.e., what people have eaten. Large quantities of deposited animal bones have been analysed over the years and complex scientific analyses of human bones have been carried out in order to establish nutrition and subsistence via 13C and other isotope analyses. It is a little puzzling why so much effort has been invested in establishing variation in prehistoric diets and so little interest in elaborating on the social dimensions of commensality. The daily dinner is not just a matter of consuming nourishment; it involves planning and gathering ingredients, and thinking about ways of cooking them and how to combine them. Eating and drinking require a number of key social elements such as materiality, spatial arrangement and place, bodily experiences, mental expectations,and bonding/exclusion.There is a considerable social dimen- sion in food that goes far beyond pure biological needs.

  • 30.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    The skin I live in. The materiality of body imagery2015In: Own and be owned: Archaeological approaches to the concept of possessions / [ed] Alison Klevnäs, Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, Stockholm: Department of archaeology and classical studies, Stockholm university , 2015, 49-72 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Anders, HögbergLinnéuniversitetet, Sverige.
    Current Swedish Archaeology: vol 22 (2014)2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Högberg, Anders
    Current Swedish archaeology: The Swedish Archaeological Society, Vol. 24 20162017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Högberg, AndersLinné universitetet.
    Current Swedish Archaeology: Vol. 21 (2013)2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Högberg, Anders
    Current Swedish Archaeology: Vol. 23 20152015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Beyond Sight: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception2010In: Making Sense of Things: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander & Anna Kjellström, Stockholm: Univ. , 2010, 200, 1-13 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Myrberg Burström, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fahlander, FredrikStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Matters of scale: processes and courses of events in the past and the present2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of process is fundamental to our understanding of past worlds. Yet, despite a growing interest in processual aspects of relations and transformations in recent strands of thought, the concept itself is rarely discussed in contemporary archaeology. In this volume, the authors aspire to put the concept back on the map by combining old and new perspectives. Applying concepts such as hybridity, resilience, punctum, and flat ontology, they present fresh and innovative analyses encompassing a wide array of issues of central importance to archaeology.

1 - 36 of 36
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