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  • 1.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Change in social selection to upper secondary school - primary and secondary effects in Sweden2010In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 291-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inequality of educational opportunity (IEO) depends on two separate mechanisms: children from advantaged social backgrounds perform better at school—primary effects—and tend more than others to choose to continue in education—secondary effects. IEO in the transition from compulsory to academic upper secondary education has earlier been shown to have decreased in Sweden since the middle of the 20th century. We investigate whether this change can be accounted for by changing primary or secondary effects, or perhaps by both. The analysis is based on longitudinal data for six cohorts of children, born from 1948 to 1982. Primary and secondary effects are separated both by grade point averages and cognitive test results. The estimation of the effects is based on the comparison of actual and counterfactual transitions among children from different social classes. Results show that the decrease in IEO overall seems to be related to corresponding changes in the primary and secondary effects. Secondary effects are greater when the separation is based on cognitive ability tests rather than grades and we end by discussing the consequences of this observation for the separation of primary and secondary effects.

  • 2.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Den sociala selektionen i utbildningssystemet: i Resultatdialog 2008: Forskning inom utbildningsvetenskap2008Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social snedrekrytering till teoretisk gymnasieutbildning2011In: Utvärdering Genom Uppföljning.:  Longitudinell individforskning under ett halvt sekel / [ed] Allan Svensson, Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis, 2011, p. 205-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4. Fleischmann, Fenella
    et al.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    van de Werfhorst, Herman G.
    Gender inequalities in the education of the second generation in Western countries2014In: Sociology of education, ISSN 0038-0407, E-ISSN 1939-8573, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 143-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on comparative analyses from nine Western countries, we ask whether local-born children from a wide range of immigrant groups show patterns of female advantage in education that are similar to those prevalent in their host Western societies. We consider five outcomes throughout the educational career: test scores or grades at age 15, continuation after compulsory schooling, choice of academic track in upper-secondary education, completion of upper secondary, and completion of tertiary education. Despite great variation in gender gaps in education in immigrants’ origin countries (with advantages for males in many cases), we find that the female advantage in education observed among the majority population is usually present among second-generation immigrants. We interpret these findings in light of ideas about gender role socialization and immigrant selectivity.

  • 5. Jackson, Michelle
    et al.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ethnic Inequality in Choice-driven Education Systems: A Longitudinal Study of Performance and Choice in England and Sweden2012In: Sociology of education, ISSN 0038-0407, E-ISSN 1939-8573, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 158-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors ask whether choice-driven education systems, with comprehensive schools and mass education at the secondary and tertiary level, represented in this article by England and Sweden, provide educational opportunities for ethnic minorities. In studying educational attainment, the authors make a theoretical distinction between mechanisms connected with school performance on the one hand (primary effects) and educational choice, given performance, on the other (secondary effects). Using large national data sets and recently developed methods, they show that performance effects tend to depress the educational attainment of most, although not all, ethnic minorities, whereas choice effects increase the transition rates of these students. This pattern is repeated at the transition to university education. These results are true for many immigrant categories in both England and Sweden, although immigrant students are a heterogeneous group. Black Caribbean students in England and children of Turkish and South American descent in Sweden fare worst, while several Asian groups do extremely well. The authors conclude that it may be a generic feature of choice-driven school systems in Western societies to benefit non-European immigrants, and they discuss some possible explanations for this.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Engzell Waldén, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Integration, etnisk mångfald och attityder bland högstadieelever: Resultat från enkätstudien YES! inom projektet CILS4EU2012In: Främlingsfienden inom oss: Bilagedel, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ethnic differences in early school-leaving: an international comparison.2014In: Unequal attainments: ethnic educational inequalities in ten Western countries / [ed] Anthony Heath and Yaël Brinbaum, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Weak Performance—Strong Determination: School Achievement and Educational Choice among Children of Immigrants in Sweden2011In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 487-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We ask how the advantages and disadvantages in the educational careers of children of immigrants in Sweden are produced, making a theoretical distinction between mechanisms connected with school performance on one hand, and educational choice on the other. Using a new data set, covering six full cohorts of Swedish-born ninth-graders in 1998–2003 (N¼612,730), with matched school-Census information, we show that children of non-European immigrant origin are disadvantaged in their school performance but advantaged in their choice of academic upper secondary education. They have lower and more often incomplete grades, which force a sizeable proportion—10–20 per cent—into non-meritorious tracks or lead them to leave school. Given grades, children of non-European background make heterogeneous choices: many do not enrol in upper secondary education, but among those who do the propensity is high that they choose academic studies before vocational. In contrast, children of the ‘old’ (chiefly Nordic) labour immigrants are similar to the majority group in their equal preference for these two routes. A school system where choice plays a significant role appears to be advantageous for the often high-aspiring second-generation immigrant students, but greater efforts to reduce early achievement differences may still alleviate ethnic minority disadvantages.

  • 9.
    Plenty, Stephanie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Andersson, Anton B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hjalmarsson, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Treuter, Georg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    How are our young adults doing? A report on labour market activities and living conditions2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report has three aims:

    1. To describe the activity statuses of young adults aged 19–20 years, based on their own reports.

    2. To identify vulnerable subgroups. This is done among NEET youth, but the perspective is widened by also considering vulnerable positions among youth in work or education.

    3. To describe the living conditions for young adults in different activity types and with different degrees of vulnerability.

  • 10.
    Plenty, Stephanie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Andersson, Anton B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hjalmarsson, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Treuter, Georg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hur går det för våra unga vuxna? En rapport om sysselsättning och levnadsvillkor2018Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Class differences in educational and occupational aspirations and subsequent educational success among Swedish youthManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Educational inequalities in Sweden: past, present and future in a comprehensive school system?2014In: Scuola democratica : Learning for Democracy, ISSN 1129-731X, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ever declining inequalities?: Primary and secondary effects in Sweden at the transition to upper secondary and higher education for students born in 1972-1990Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ever-declining inequalities?: transitions to upper secondary school and tertiary education in Sweden, 1972-1990 birth cohorts2013In: Determined to succeed?: performance versus choice in educational attainment / [ed] Jackson, Michelle Victoria, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Inequality in Educational Outcomes: How Aspirations, Performance, and Choice Shape School Careers in Sweden2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines different aspects of educational inequalities, drawing on the notion that inequality in educational attainment depends on two separate mechanisms: that children from advantaged social backgrounds perform better at school (primary effects) and tend more than others to choose to continue in education given performance (secondary effects).

    Study I shows that the long-term decrease in social class inequality in the transition from compulsory to academic upper secondary education since the middle of the mid-20th century up to the late 1990s, seems to be related to both declining primary and secondary effects. Secondary effects account for around 35 to 40 percent of the total inequality in academic upper secondary education.

    Study II suggests that there has been a continuing trend of declining inequality in academic upper secondary education between pupils of high and low educational origin between 1998 and 2006, a development mainly driven by change in secondary effects. Primary effects have remained more stable and account for a substantial part of the inequality process across the two most important educational transitions.

    Study III indicates that class inequality in educational performance at age 16 is attributable to a non-trivial degree to a class gradient in aspirations at age 13. It is argued that survey information on aspirations may help disentangle how educational inequalities develop through feedback processes between skills and ambitions throughout educational careers. Treating early aspirations as anticipatory decisions, by letting their effect on performance represent a choice effect, suggests that cross-sectional estimates of the proportion secondary effects are downwardly biased by up to six percent.

    In Study IV, Swedish-born children of immigrant parents are shown to be a heterogeneous group in terms of educational outcomes, with some subgroups doing very well and others quite poorly. A polarized pattern is revealed. Many minority groups do not perform on a par with their majority peers in compulsory school. Conditional on grades, children with parents of a non-European background often do not enroll in upper secondary education, but among those who do, the propensity is high to choose academic studies over vocational.

  • 16.
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Spelar föräldrarnas födelseland roll? Svenskfödda ungdomars betyg och gymnasieval2012In: Framtider (Tema integration), ISSN 0281-0492, no 2, p. 11-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tro, hopp och utbildning. Sociala skillnader i ungdomars utbildningsaspirationer2014In: Ojämlikhetens dimensioner: uppväxtvillkor, arbete och hälsa i Sverige / [ed] Marie Evertsson & Charlotta Magnusson, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, p. 125-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Rudolphi, Frida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social selection in formal and informal tracking in Sweden2016In: Secondary education models and social inequality: an international comparison / [ed] Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Sandra Buchholz, Jan Skopek, Moris Triventi, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 165-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 18 of 18
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  • nn-NO
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