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  • 1.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Animals, plants, people and digital technology: exploring and understanding multispecies-computer interaction2015In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, article id 55Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding interactions involving humans and computers has ever since its establishment in the early 1980s been a key foundation for the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) and its development. The idea that important features are going on inside the human brain (i.e. classical HCI theory/first wave) has been challenged by the importance to understand both context and collaboration among humans (i.e. modern HCI theory/second wave) and by comprising human values and experiences (i.e. contemporary HCI theory/third wave) [27]. As such, the field has been permeated by anthropocentrism, engaged in designing and accounting for human users and diverse aspects of human life.

  • 2.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The private and the public in online presentations of the self: A critical development of Goffman’s dramaturgical perspective2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Erving Goffman is an important sociologist whose dramaturgical perspective on social interaction and presentation of the self is a classic within sociology. However, social interaction and presentations of the self occurs increasingly more online. Goffman’s perspective is, unfortunately, limited to face-to-face interaction. The aim of this study is to discuss how far Goffman’s dramaturgical perspective can take us in a discussion on the private and the public in online presentations of the self in Facebook and personal blogs. The aim is specified with the following research questions: What are the possible constrains and possibilities? What happens to the central concepts in the model? How can the model be critically developed to online presentations of the self? The discussion connects to the distinction between the private and the public, as it implicitly is presented in Goffman’s model.

    The discussion draws on empirical material consisting of reflections of ten individuals on their social practices on Facebook and personal blogs. As all respondents use both applications, it opens up for a comparison between how they present themselves in each forum.

    All respondents presented themselves differently on Facebook compared to their personal blogs. Goffman’s model works better on self-presentations on Facebook than on personal blogs, which are contradictive to the model. Facebook is about staging a successful character. Conversely, the idea with the personal blog was to stage the front stage as a backstage. Performances on the personal blog constitute an inverted model where the intimate is sublimated and ritualized. Additionally, impression management follows an altered logic of selective opening of the backstage. However, the performances are just as, if not even more, theatrical and dramaturgical as performances in Goffman’s model. Moreover, social situations on Facebook and personal blogs are dissimilar to face-to-face situations. Both settings can be seen as an abstract sociability rather than a concrete sociability. There is no immediate co-presence between the interactants which has the consequence of creating an uncertainty of in front of whom the performance actually is held, which in addition makes the social situation diffuse, scattered and harder to define.

  • 3.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Theorizing Animal–Computer Interaction as Machinations2017In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 98, p. 135-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased involvement of animals in digital technology and user-computer research opens up for new possibilities and forms of interaction. It also suggests that the emerging field of Animal–Computer Interaction (ACI) needs to reconsider what should be counted as interaction. The most common already established forms of interaction are direct and dyadic, and limited to domesticated animals such as working dogs and pets. Drawing on an ethnography of the use of mobile proximity sensor cameras in ordinary wild boar hunting we emphasize a more complex, diffuse, and not directly observable form of interaction, which involves wild animals in a technological and naturalistic setting. Investigating human and boar activities related to the use of these cameras in the light of Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and Goffman's notion of strategic interaction reveals a gamelike interaction that is prolonged, networked and heterogeneous, in which members of each species is opposed the other in a mutual assessment acted out through a set of strategies and counter-strategies. We stress the role of theory for the field of ACI and how conceptualizations of interaction can be used to excite the imagination and be generative for design. Seeing interaction as strategies and acknowledging the existence of complex interdependencies could potentially inspire the design of more indirect and non-dyadic interactions where a priori simplifications of design challenges as either human or animal can be avoided.

  • 4.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Chiodo, Elisa
    Smelling, pulling, and looking: unpacking similarities and differences in dog and human city life2015In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, article id 64Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of understanding animals, e.g., what they want and what they are doing, are recurrent matters for the emerging field of animal-computer interaction (ACI). We focus on animals in the city by bridging the field with urban studies and open up for new design opportunities in terms of the possibilities of new digital technology to re-configure animal city life. We present an ethnomethodological video analysis of the negotiations and interactional work between two leashed pugs and a handler walking down a street. We unpack similarities and differences between the two species in terms of their interests and intentions in an urban environment through detailed examination of the moments in the walk when the leash is pulled taut. We show how a strained leash can result from a conflict between the dog’s attentiveness towards other dogs by smelling and looking, and the human’s urge to move along. We propose design directions supporting the dogs’ wants and needs by accessing the handler with information on the dogs’ curiosities in other dogs by visualizing the invisible scent-universe of the dogs and encourage dog-dog interaction.

  • 5.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Väätäjä, Heli
    Understanding animals: A critical challenge in ACI2018In: NordiCHI '18 Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 148-160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a qualitative content analysis of visual-verbal social media posts, where ordinary dog owners pretend to be their canine, to identify meaningful facets in their dogs' life-worlds, e.g. pleasures of human-dog relation, dog-dog relations, food etc. We use this knowledge to inform design of "quantified pets". The study targets a general problem in Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI), i.e. to understand animals when designing "for" them, although lacking a common language. Several approaches, e.g. ethnography and participatory design, have been appropriated from HCI without exhausting the issue. We argue for a methodological creativity and pluralism by suggesting an additional approach drawing on "kinesthetic empathy". It implies to understand animals by empathizing with their bodily movements over time and decoding the realities of their life-worlds. This, and other related approaches, has inspired animal researchers to conduct more or less radical participant observations during extensive duration to understand the perspective of the other. We suggest that dog owners whom share their lives with their dogs already possess a similar understanding as these experts, and thus uphold important experiences of canine life that could be used to understand individual dogs and inspire design.

  • 6.
    Aspling, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wang, Jinyi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Plant-computer interaction, beauty and dissemination2016In: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Animal-Computer Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, article id 5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We inquire into ways of understanding plant interaction through a triangulation of four approaches: a multispecies ethnography of people's ordinary practices and doings in relation to sakura trees during their short blossoming season; readings of theoretical works on human-plant relations and plants' urge to spread; a systematic review of how plants are involved in computing and computer systems; and finally a review study on how cherry blossoms are used in design and architecture. We bring these together and propose to discuss the involvement of florae in computer systems and design items through the lens of understanding plant interaction as temporally extended dissemination and agency to spread. The design intent within Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI) has been to develop systems where non-human species are seen as "users". If such an approach is applied to plants, then we need to frame research in a direction that aims to give us an understanding of what these sorts of users are doing. Since the most successful forms of dissemination are hedonic, we argue that researchers should focus more specifically on system design that supports aesthetic interaction, rather than supporting abstract contemplation, as has been common within Human-Computer Interaction (HCI).

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