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  • 1.
    Bolinius, Damien Johann
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem ACES, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, SE-11418 Stockholm, Sweden.
    MacLeod, Matthew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Iadaresta, Francesco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Holmbäck, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Lipidor AB, Karolinska Institutet Science Park, Sweden.
    Jahnke, Annika
    Sorptive Capacities of Nonpolymeric Plant Lipids for Hydrophobic Chemicals Determined by Passive Dosing2019In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 1278-1286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vegetation plays an important role in the partitioning, transport, and fate of semivolatile hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in the environment. Leaf/air partition ratios (K-leaf/air) of HOCs are highly variable for different plant species. The differences cannot be fully explained by the fraction of lipids in the leaves or the thickness of the cuticle. Our goal was to elucidate the importance of non polymeric lipids in determining K-leaf/air To do this, we extracted organic matter from 7 plant species using solvents that do not extract the polymeric lipids cutin and cutan, to yield extractable organic matter (EOM). We used passive dosing to determine the partition ratios of selected HOCs between the EOM of the leaves and our reference lipid, olive oil (K-EOM/olive oil) In addition, we measured analogous partition ratios for three lipid standards. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the composition of lipids. Differences in K-EOM/olive oil of two polychlorinated biphenyls and four chlorinated benzenes were below a factor of 2 in the plant species studied, indicating that the reported differences in K-leaf/air are not caused by differences in the sorptive capacities of nonpolymeric lipids or that our EOM is not representative of all nonpolymeric leaf lipids.

  • 2.
    Bolinius, Dämien
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    MacLeod, Matthew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Iadaresta, Francesco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Holmbäck, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Jahnke, Annika
    Sorptive capacities of leaf lipids for hydrophobic organic chemicals: Lipid characterization and passive dosing experimentsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Iadaresta, Francesco
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Crescenzi, Carlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Universita di Salerno, Italy.
    Amini, Ahmad
    Colmsjö, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Koyi, Hirsh
    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Application of graphitic sorbent for online microextraction of drugs in human plasma samples2015In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1422, p. 34-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work a new sorbent based on graphitized carbon (CarbonX (R) COA) was evaluated in microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) for extraction of lidocaine and ropivacaine from human plasma samples. The new graphitic sorbent showed high recoveries of lidocaine and ropivacaine compared to C18 sorbent In the present study the G-MEPS (syringe packed with graphitic sorbent) was connect online with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In order to obtain a fast and reliable method different factors affecting MEPS performance were investigated. The extraction efficiency of the graphitic sorbent was compared with silica-based sorbents used in MEPS. The G-MEPS was also evaluated for reuse (50-100 times). The recoveries of lidocaine and ropivacaine from plasma samples were 79% and 82%; respectively. The method was validated according to FDA (Food and Drug Administration) guideline for bioanalytical method validation. Linearity was assessed in the range 5-2000 nmol/L, with coefficient of determination r(2) > 0,995 (n=3) for lidocaine and r(2) > 0.997 (n=3) for ropivacaine. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 5 nmol/L and the limit of detection (LOD) was 1 nmol/L for studied analytes in plasma samples. For both analytes considered in this study the accuracy values in plasma samples were ranged from 86% to 113%. The Inter-day precisions, expressed as relative standard deviation (%RSD), at three different concentrations (QC-samples) ranged from 8% to 9% for lidocaine, and from 4% to 11% for ropivacaine.

  • 4.
    Iadaresta, Francesco
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Manniello, Michele Dario
    Östman, Conny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Crescenzi, Carlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. University of Salerno, Italy.
    Holmbäck, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Russo, Paola
    Chemicals from textiles to skin: an in vitro permeation study of benzothiazole2018In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 25, no 25, p. 24629-24638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the possible impact on human health, few studies have been conducted to assess the penetration and accumulation of contaminants in the skin after a prolonged contact with textile materials. In previous studies, we have shown that benzothiazole and its derivatives, as well as other potentially hazardous chemicals, often are present as textile contaminants in clothes available on the retail market. Since benzothiazole is a common contaminant in clothes, these can be a possible route for human chemical exposure, both systemic and onto the skin. To investigate this potential exposure, Franz-type and flow-through cells were used for the permeation studies together with a Strat-MA (R) artificial membranes. Experiments were performed using solutions of benzothiazole, as well as contaminated textile samples in the donor chamber. Benzothiazole was demonstrated to penetrate through, as well as being accumulated in the membrane mimicking the skin. After 24 h, up to 62% of benzothiazole was found in the acceptor cell, while up to 37% was found absorbed in the skin mimicking membrane. It also was shown that there was release and permeation from contaminated fabrics. The results indicate that benzothiazole can be released from textile materials, penetrate through the skin, and further enter the human body. This will possibly also apply to other chemical contaminants in textiles, and the results of this study indicate that the presence of these textile contaminants entails potential health risks. A rough risk assessment was made for clothing textiles according to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and European regulations for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic compounds, using literature data for benzothiazole.

  • 5.
    Luongo, Giovanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Iadaresta, Francesco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Moccia, Emanuele
    Crescenzi, Carlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Östman, Conny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Aromatic amines in textilesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Luongo, Giovanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Iadaresta, Francesco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Moccia, Emanuele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Östman, Conny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Crescenzi, Carlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. University of Salerno, Italy.
    Determination of aniline and quinoline compounds in textiles2016In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 1471, p. 11-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple method for simultaneous determination of twenty-one analytes, belonging to two classes of compounds, aromatic amines and quinolines, is presented. Several of the analytes considered in this study frequently occur in textiles goods on the open market and have been related to allergic contact dermatitis and/or are proven or suspected carcinogens. The method includes an efficient clean-up step using graphitized carbon black (GCB) that simplifies and improves the robustness of the subsequent GC-MS analysis. Briefly, after solvent extraction of the textile sample, the extract is passed through a GCB SPE cartridge that selectively retain dyes and other interfering compounds present in the matrix, producing a clean extract, suitable for GC-MS analysis, is obtained. The method was evaluated by spiking blank textiles with the selected analytes. Method quantification limits (MQL) ranged from 5 to 720 ng/g depending on the analyte. The linear range of the calibration curves ranged over two order magnitude with coefficients of determination (R-2) higher than 0.99. Recoveries ranged from 70 to 92% with RSDs 1.7-14%. The effectiveness of the method was tested on a variety of textile materials samples from different origin. In a pilot explorative survey, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitroaniline was detected in all the analysed clothing samples in concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 576 mu g/g 2,4-dinitroaniline was detected in four of the seven samples with a highest concentration of 305 mu g/g Quinoline was detected in all samples in concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 6.2 mu g/g. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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