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  • 1.
    Abrahamson, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Tryggvesson, Kalle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Socialtjänstens användning av standardiserade klientbedömningsinstrument – ASI som retorik och praktik i två svenska kommuner2009In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 21-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany.
    Tryggvesson, Kalle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Pabst, Alexander
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    Involvement in alcohol-related verbal or physical aggression. Does social status matter?2015In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 449-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION -The analyses (1) assessed the association between social status variables and aggression when controlling for volume of alcohol consumption and episodic heavy drinking (EHD), (2) tested whether social status moderates the association between volume or EHD and verbal as well as physical aggression, and (3) investigated whether EHD moderates the effect of volume on aggression. METHODS - Swedish Alcohol Monitoring Survey (2003 to 2011); N=104,316 current drinkers; response rate: 51 to 38%. Alcohol-related aggression was defined as involvement in a quarrel or physical fight while drinking. Social status was defined as the highest education, monthly income and marital status. RESULTS -The associations between social status variables and aggression showed mixed results. Verbal aggression was associated with education in males and with marital status in both genders. Physical aggression was associated with education in both genders. No associations with aggression were found for income. With few exceptions, these associations remained significant when controlling for drinking patterns; social status did not moderate the association between drinking and aggression; EHD moderated the effect of volume on physical aggression in males. CONCLUSIONS - Groups of lower educated and non-married individuals experience verbal or physical aggression over and above different levels of consumption. Individual differences in aggression vulnerability rather than differences in aggression predisposition account for higher risks of aggression in these groups.

  • 3. Leppo, Anna
    et al.
    Hecksher, Dorte
    Tryggvesson, Kalle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    'Why take chances?' Advice on alcohol intake to pregnant and non-pregnant women in four Nordic countries2014In: Health, Risk and Society, ISSN 1369-8575, E-ISSN 1469-8331, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 512-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we explore the construction of risk in government guidelines on alcohol intake during and before pregnancy in four Nordic countries given that there is no sound evidence linking a low level of alcohol intake during pregnancy to foetal harm. In the article we draw on two sources of data to examine the rationale behind the advice given to pregnant women: health education materials and other government documents, such as guidelines for professionals. We found that in all the four countries the government guidelines advised pregnant women to completely abstain from alcohol consumption, but there was some variation between the countries in the advice for non-pregnant women. The guidance in the four countries also differed in the extent to which they discussed the lack of evidence behind the abstinence advice and the precautionary approach on which the advice was based. In all the four countries the printed and widely circulated health education materials did not explain that the abstinence advice was not based on actual evidence of harm but on a precautionary approach. The other government documents adopted varying strategies for justifying the abstinence advice including not offering information about the uncertainty of the knowledge base, implying that there was evidence that low alcohol consumption was harmful to the foetus, acknowledging that a safe level of alcohol intake during pregnancy could not be specified and explaining the precautionary approach to risk. In this article we argue that the shift from 'estimation of risk' to the 'precautionary principle' is a part of a wider socio-cultural push towards broader employment of the precautionary principle as a strategy to manage uncertainty, and in the context of pregnancy, it is a part of the symbolic struggle to protect the purity of the foetus and construct the 'perfect mother'.

  • 4.
    Tryggvesson, Kalle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Att köpa frihet på flaska: Om alkohol som orsak och ursäkt för våld2008In: Våld i välfärdsland: SOcialtjänstforum-ett möte mellan forskning och socialtjänst., 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Tryggvesson, Kalle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Mot ett kontinentalt dryckesmönster, eller inte? Förändringar i svenskarnas alkoholkonsumtion mellan 1996 och 20052013In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 249-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Alcohol consumption on an aggregate level rose by 30 percent in Sweden between 1996 and 2004 according to available research. However, alcohol-related harm has not increased as much as expected. The purpose of this study is to analyze how the self-reported alcohol consumption changed between 1996 and 2005.

    Data

    Self-reported alcohol consumption was investigated with four identical surveys implemented by Statistics Sweden, 1996 (n = 5891, response rate 78.7 %), 1997 (n = 5807, response rate 77.8 %), 2004 (n = 5591, response rate 74.8 %) and 2006 (4277, response rate 75.1 %). In addition to weekly volume of alcohol consumption, we have data on beverage specific consumption, daily alcohol consumption for the different days of the week, frequency of binge drinking and several background variables of good quality.

    Results

    Self-reported alcohol consumption rose between 96/97 and 04/05, but only with 15 percent. The increase was relatively evenly distributed but women, older people and low to middle consumer groups increased their consumption the most. The frequency of binge drinking also increased as did the proportion of alcohol consumed during the weekend.

    Conclusions

    The increase in alcohol consumption was smaller in our study than the increase reported earlier. A few changes in the consumption pattern that could explain a diverging trend between the total alcohol consumption and alcohol related harms were found.

  • 6.
    Tryggvesson, Kalle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    "Syringe exchange - given only the off drugs": Swedish authorities and politicians management of clean needles for drug addicts2012In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 519-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS - The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how Swedish authorities and politicians have related to syringe exchange in Sweden during the last 25 years. As the syringe exchange in Sweden still is very limited, this study focuses on the arguments for and against syringe exchange, and how the question has been formulated in the political proposals during the period studied. METHODS AND DATA - Since 1988 the National Board of Health and Welfare conducted three major studies on the effects and relevance of syringe exchange. These studies, and the policy documents that followed, are qualitatively analyzed in this paper. RESULTS - The processes have all looked the same; NBHW has proposed syringe exchange programs, which are a mix of drug policy and infection control aspects. During the political process the proposals have changed so that the infections control aspects has been downgraded on behalf of drug-policy interests. The arguments for this change have to their nature been abstract. CONCLUSIONS - Even though Sweden established its first experiments with syringe exchange already in the mid-1980s, it is not before the year 2006 that the country’s all counties by law are allowed to provide clean syringes to their drug users. However, the law is modeled on a fear of harmful effects of drug use, and a will to rather encourage drug treatment than other measures. Thereby the importance of the infections control aspect is heavily undermined.

  • 7.
    Tryggvesson, Kalle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The role of alcohol in the construction av a 'good' victim: the attribution of blame to male victims of violence2008In: International review of vitimology, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 19-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Tryggvesson, Kalle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Bullock, Sandra L
    Is it a fight or are they just drunk?: Attributions about drunken behaviour in a hypothetical Male-to-Male aggression scenario2006In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 61-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. This paper examines the excuse-value of alcohol in a hypothetical provoked male-to-male violence scenario. There are two main questions. Does intoxication result in decreased blame? Does intoxication lessen the propensity to call the police? Methods. 1004 random digit dialing (RDD) quantitative telephone surveys were completed with Swedes aged 16-25. The response rate was 73.8%. Besides the aggressor's intoxication, severity of the outcome, the victim's intoxication and the respondent's hypothetical relationship to the aggressor or to the victim were also randomly manipulated. Whether the police should be called and the attribution of blame to the aggressor have been analysed using ANOVA in SAS. Results. Analyses were stratified by sex. For male respondents, the aggressor's intoxication interacted (four-way) with all the manipulated variables in predicting the attribution of blame. In the more severe act, intoxication tended to reduce blame; the least amount of blame was assigned when both the aggressor and the victim were intoxicated. For female respondents, the aggressor's intoxication was involved in a three-way interaction. For them also, intoxication decreases the blame for the severe acts but not for the less severe acts. The aggressor's intoxication had very little effect on whether the police should be called or not. Discussion. Intoxication provides some excuse from blame but only for certain acts and under certain circumstances. It also changes the way people perceive acts of violence.

  • 9.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Kalle, Tryggvesson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Alcohol, health and reproduction: an analysis of Swedish public health campaigns against drinking during pregnancy2015In: Critical Discourse Studies, ISSN 1740-5904, E-ISSN 1740-5912, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 57-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes two recent Swedish public health campaigns targeting pregnant women's drinking: A good start, a pamphlet by the Swedish National Institute of Public Health, and Advice about food for you who are pregnant, a brochure by the Swedish National Food Administration. It conceptualizes the public health campaigns as governmental attempts to steer citizens' behavior and behavior-related desires, aspirations, and beliefs toward a certain understanding of normal healthy lifestyle. The public health campaigns are seen as part of larger processes of bio-power. By applying critical discourse analysis, the article, first, asks how drinking during pregnancy is represented in the campaigns as a health risk. Second, it analyses how the pamphlets advise women to take action to restrain from drinking during pregnancy and what kind of knowledge the pamphlets use to legitimate intervening in the women's lifestyles. And finally, it analyses how the pamphlets try to persuade the women to identify with the proposed information and recommendations. The analysis shows that the campaigns construct an intimate partnership between the state and the citizen. By extending the medical public health gaze to reach inside the female body to emphasize how easily fetal development can be disturbed, and by making women's individual lifestyle choices both the cause of and solution to potential damage during fetal development, the pamphlets make mothers solely responsible and culpable for the health status of the fetus. Partners and fathers are practically absent from the campaign pamphlets. Both campaigns bypass the responsibilities of communities and other broad social institutions in preventing drinking during pregnancy. The campaigns, though having many similarities, differ from each other in terms of the kinds of choices they have made inrepresentationsaction, and identification.

1 - 9 of 9
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