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  • 1.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Afrikas Horn1994In: Fjern og Naer: Sosialantropologiske Perspektiver på Verdens Samfunn og Kulturer / [ed] Signe Howell, Marit Melhuus, Oslo: Ad Notam Gyldendal , 1994, p. 102-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University.
    Anthropology, Museums, and Contemporary Cultural Processes An Introduction, with Ronald Stade: An Introduction2000In: Ethnos: journal of anthropology, ISSN pr:0014-1844, O-l 1469-588X, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 157-171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Berättelse som bot1983In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 60, no 7, p. 389-394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Det nyttiga barnet1984In: Barn i tid och rum / [ed] Karin Aronsson, Marianne Cederblad, Gudrun Dahl, Lars Olsson, Bengt Sandin, Malmö: Liber, 1984, p. 128-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Economics: Pastoral Economics2007In: Encyclopedia of Women in Islamic Cultures, vol. 4, University of California , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Former Department of Advertising and PR2014In: Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University: 1964-2014 / [ed] Gudrun Dahl, Mats Danielson, Stockholm: Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 325-337Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Har bönder stora fötter? eller kampen med kategorierna1994In: Den antropologiska erfarenheten: liv, vetenskap, visioner / [ed] Kaj Århem, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 1994, p. 251-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Idéer om barndom och barnets natur1984In: Barn i tid och rum / [ed] Karin Aronsson, Marianne Cederblad, Gudrun Dahl, Lars Olsson, Bengt Sandin, Malmö: Liber, 1984, p. 9-23Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Is Good Intention Enough to Be Heard? On Appadurai's 'Capacity to Aspire'2016In: Voice and Matter Communication: Communication, Development and the Cultural Return / [ed] Oscar Hemer, Tomas Tufte, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2016, p. 225-239Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The point of departure for my contribution is a reflection over Appadurai’s approach to hope in relation to the contradictions between the politics and moralities of recognition versus redistribution and the ascription of individualising or structural explanations for the predicament of poor people. The will to give recognition is perspectivised in relation to contemporary developmental ideologies that make grassroots’ connections a moral value. However, an emphasis on hope as a basically individual characteristic or a cultural trait is also problematized in relation to the arguments of traditional ‘theories of ascription’. The explanation of other people’s actions tends to stress their own characteristics rather than the situational conditions under which they act. This may be a constraint for how even well intended academic discourse is received, transforming cultural or individual explanations into static models of the “blame-the-victim” type.

  • 10.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Mats and Milkpots: The Domain of Borana Women1990In: The creative communion: African folk models of fertility and the regeneration of life / [ed] A. Jakobson-Widding, and W.E.A. van Beek, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 1990Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Naming a Borana1998In: KVHAA Konferenser 42, Stockholm: Published contributions to the symposium on Personhood and Social Identity in Stora Brännbo, Sigtuna , 1998, p. 331-336Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    On consuming and being consumed1999In: Modernity on a shoestring: dimensions of globalization, consumption and development in Africa and beyond : based on an EIDOS conference held at The Hague, 13-16 March 1997 / [ed] Richard Fardon, Wim M. J. van Binsbergen, Rijk van Dijk, Leiden: EIDOS in association with the African Studies Centre Leiden and the Centre of African Studies London , 1999, p. 13-32Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Pastoralism in anthropology2001In: International encyclopedia of the social & behavioral sciences: Vol. 16, [New-Per] / [ed] Neil J. Smelser, Paul B. Baltes, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2001, p. 11108-11111Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Possession as Cure: The Ayaana Cult of Waso Borana1989In: Culture, Experience and Pluralism: Essays on African Ideas of Illness and Healing / [ed] Anita Jacobson-Widding, David Westerlund, Uppsala: Almqvist & Wiksell, 1989, p. 151-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Reflections in and on the Hall of Mirrors2014In: Anthropology now and next: essays in honor of Ulf Hannerz / [ed] Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Christina Garsten, and Shalini Randeria, New York: Berghahn Books, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sociology and Beyond: Agency,  Victimization and the ethics of scientific writing.2009In: Asian Journal of Social Science, ISSN 1568-4849, E-ISSN 2212-3857, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 391-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, development discourse has taken a neo-liberal turn. Parallel to this, the discourse of social science has become more oriented to matters of individual agency. Within the sociological and anthropological literature on development, this emphasis on individual agency is often expressed in terms of an explicit statement taken by the author that s/he wishes to correct an earlier (ethically inferior) emphasis on structure that is assumed to imply that the concerned people are passive victims. Problematising this ethics of scientific writing, this paper will look at various discourses in which the concept of victimhood is used, seeing claims and disclaimers of victimhood as themselves being expressions of agency in a contestation over accountability, responsibility, recognition and possible indemnification or blame.

  • 17.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sources of life and identity1996In: Being and becoming Oromo: historical and anthropological enquiries / [ed] P.T.W. Baxter, Jan Hultin, Alessandro Triulzi, Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, 1996, p. 162-177Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Oromo people are one of the most numerous in Africa. Census data are not reliable but there are probably twenty million people whose first language is Oromo and who recognize themselves as Oromo. In the older literature they are often called Galla. Except for a relatively small number of arid land pastoralists who live in Kenya, all homelands lie in Ethiopia, where they probably make up around 40 percent of the total population. Geographically their territories, though they are not always contiguous, extend from the highlands of Ethiopia in the north, to the Ogaden and Somalia in the east, to the Sudan border in the west, and across the Kenyan border to the Tana River in the south.Though different Oromo groups vary considerably in their modes of subsistence and in their local organizations, they share similar cultures and ways of thought.

  • 18.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Structure Agency and Victimization: On the ethics of scientific writing2008In: Asian Journal of Social Science: A Special Issue, ISSN 1568-4849Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Suffering grass: subsistence and society of Waso Borana1979Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Beja of Sudan and the Famine of 1984-19861991In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 189-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Howthe Beja, largely apolitical nomadic pastoralists of northeastern Sudan, perceived their profound misfortunes during the drought of the 1 980s is examined. The famine of 1984-1986 was considered neither to have resulted from their own actions nor to be amenable to alleviation by them-both being functions of God, perhaps acting through the central government. Those Beja who were forced by the famine to abandon their traditional ways appear to be ripe for politicization.

  • 21.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Wildflowers, Nationalism and the Swedish Law of Commons1998In: Worldviews, ISSN 1363-5247, E-ISSN 1568-5357, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 281-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In post-war Sweden, overt demonstrations of political nationalism have been considered bad taste. In middle-class culture, the construction and emotional charging of Swedishness have instead taken place in terms of an idiom of love for nature. Conceptions of freedom and equality are by this idiom tied up with symbolic references to childhood and to the flora of forests and meadows. The Swedish 'Every Man's Law' regulating access to flowers and berries and mobility in the natural landscape in this context comes to stand as a central national symbol.

  • 22.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Words as moral badges: A Flow of Buzzwords in Development Aid2007In: Sustainable Development in a Globalized World: Studies in Development, Security and Culture, Volume 1, Palgrave Macmillan , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Kultur, kunskap och vetande1984In: Barn i tid och rum / [ed] Karin Aronsson, Marianne Cederblad, Gudrun Dahl, Lars Olsson, Bengt Sandin, Malmö: Liber, 1984, p. 64-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Bartholdson, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Favero, Paolo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Modernities on the Move2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tehran, Delhi, Salvador

    The present volume emanates from three studies of youngsters and young adults in three urban contexts in the world: in Tehran in Iran, Delhi in India, and Salvador in Brazil. To them, global as well as local ideas about modernization, traditionalism and authenticity provide frames for interpreting the development of society and evaluating one’s own life.

    The young people that this volume is concerned with were all born in the 1980s. Today they are adults. They all relate to a globalized market of recognition, but also one of potential resources such as attractive commodities, international jobs, local jobs with an international touch, or international support for local activities through the NGO world. Their rod of reference for judging their own life is global. Their sense of time and progress is related to the important developments of their own countries - internally and in relation to the global context - during their own lifespan and possibly that of their parents. Yet, cultural identity is in all the three cases also marked by a relation to ideas about tradition. Becoming modern may also entail redescribing, reinventing and reviving pasts in which the parents’ generation saw little value. The volume as a whole endeavours to give a contribution to the ethnography of varying cultural conceptualisations of modernity.

  • 25.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Danielson, MatsStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University: 1964-20142014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Hjort, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Having herds: pastoral herd growth and household economy1976Book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Hjort, Anders
    Pastoral change and the role of drought: SAREC report1979Report (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Hjort-af-Ornäs, Anders
    Linköping University.
    Precolonial Beja: A periphery at the crossroads2006In: Nordic Journal of African Studies (NJAS), ISSN 1459-9465, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 473-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Beja, or Bedawiye, people speaking the Northern Cushitic language called “Bedawiet”, have literally since “time immemorial” occupied the Eastern deserts of Sudan, Egypt and possibly Eritrea. They today consist of the subgroups Ababda, Bishariin, Atmaan/Amar´ar, Hadendowa and sections of the Beni Amer. These subgroups are relatively loosely integrated confederations of endogamous lineages based on assumptions of shared descent and cohabitation in an ancestral territory. In this hot and arid land, where there is little evidence of large-scale climatic change the last 2500 years, they have eked out a livelihood presumably originally as hunters of wild game and gatherers of wild grain, later as herders of small stock in the drier areas and of cattle in the delta lands, combining pastoralism with some take-a-chance cultivation. Some centuries after Christ they also acquired camels and became mounted brigands, guides and sycesin relation to the caravan trade. The present paper is an attempt to trace what can be said about the way larger context of empires, trade routes and security impinged on their lives in pre-colonial times.

  • 29.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Megerssa, Gemetchu
    The Sources of Life: Boran Concepts of Wells and Water1990In: From Water to World-Making: African Models and Arid Lands / [ed] Gísli Pálsson, Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, 1990, p. 21-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö University.
    Introduction: globalization, creolization, and cultural complexity2003In: Global Networks, ISSN 1470-2266, E-ISSN 1471-0374, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 201-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Global Networks is devoted to the work of Ulf Hannerz, whose research in urban anthropology, media anthropology, and transnational cultural processes has established his international reputation.1 Over the years, this reputationhas earned him many distinctions – he is, for example, a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, former Chair of the European Association of Social Anthropologists, and anthropology editor for the new International Enyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Such honours, however, never led to complacence. There has been a steady stream of publications and a continuous series of research projects. Most recently, Hannerz not only completed a study of the work of news media foreign correspondents, which included field research that took him to four continents, he has already started a new research project about the cultural and political dimensions of cosmopolitanism. All this attests to some measure of curiosity and resolve.

  • 31. Friedman, Jonathan
    Rhinoceros 21999In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 679-694Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Hjort af Ornäs, Anders
    et al.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Responsible man: the Atmaan Beja of north-eastern Sudan1991Book (Other academic)
1 - 32 of 32
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