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  • 1.
    Dury, Jack P. R.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fjellström, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Wallerström, Thomas
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    CONSIDERATION OF FRESHWATER AND MULTIPLE MARINE RESERVOIR EFFECTS: DATING OF INDIVIDUALS WITH MIXED DIETS FROM NORTHERN SWEDEN2018In: Radiocarbon, ISSN 0033-8222, E-ISSN 1945-5755, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 1561-1585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human burials from the cemetery at the Rounala church, northern Sweden, were radiocarbon (C-14) dated to shed light on the use of the cemetery. Carbon, nitrogen and sulfur stable isotope analysis of bone collagen from 19 distinct individuals indicated that these individuals had a mixed diet consisting of freshwater, marine and terrestrial resources. Dietary modeling using FRUITS was employed to calculate the contributions of the different resources for each individual. These data were then used to calculate individual Delta R values, taking into account freshwater and multiple marine reservoir effects, the latter caused by Baltic and Atlantic marine dietary inputs, respectively. C-14 dating of tissues from modern freshwater fish species demonstrate a lack of a freshwater reservoir effect in the area. Two OxCal models were used to provide endpoint age estimates. The calibrated data suggest that the site's cemetery was most likely in use already from the 14th century, and perhaps until at least the late 18th century.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Analysis of human skeletal remains from Sømmevågen, Sola, Rogaland, Norway2018Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Immigrant, returnee or commuter?2007In: On the Road: Studies in honour of Lars Larsson / [ed] Hårdh, B, Jennbert, K. & Olausson, D., Almqvist & Wiksell International, Stockholm , 2007, p. 188-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalys av ett humanben från Brunstad konferansesenter, Stokke, Vestfold, Norge2015Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Kanaljorden 3:1, Motala stad, RAÄ 187, Östergötland2017Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Strandvägen, Motala, RAÄ 290, Östergötland2016Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av humant skelettmaterial från Stora Uppåkra, Uppåkra sn, Skåne2011Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av material från Jävre och Luleå i Norrbotten2015Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol- och kväveisotopanalyser av humant material från Gnista, Danmark sn, Uppland2015Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Part-time farmers or hard-core sealers?: Västerbjers studied by means of stable isotope analysis2004In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 135-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Slutrapport över isotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Strandvägen, Motala, RAÄ 290, Östergötland2018Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Stable isotope analysis of human and faunal remains from Zvejnieki2006In: Back to the origin: New research in the mesolithic-neolithic Zvejniek cemetery and environment, Northern Latvia / [ed] Larsson, Lars & Zagorska, Ilga, Almqvist & Wiksell , 2006, p. 183-215Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope nalysis of human faunal remains from Zvejnieki Stone Age complex revealed a considerable input of freswater fish in the diet of people buried at Zvejnieki. This emphasison freshwater fish diminished in the Late Neoltithic and Bronze Age periods.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Stable isotope analysis of humans2013In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial / [ed] Tarlow, Sarah & Nilsson Stutz, Liv, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 123-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stable isotope analyses of skeletal remains have become increasingly important within the field of archaeology during the past few decades. Given that the analyses can (under certain circumstances) provide direct data at the individual level regarding, for example, subsistence, actual consumption of specific foodstuffs, the transition from foraging to farming, breastfeeding patterns, mobility, migration and contact with other groups, this is not surprising. This chapter provides an overview of the kind of archaeological issues that can be addressed with the use of stable isotope analyses, based on four of the most commonly used light elements (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulphur), with an emphasis on carbon and nitrogen. The applications are illustrated with examples from various parts of the world, ranging from Pleistocene to Medieval date. It also deals with how and why the analyses work, and bring up some methodological limitations and potential pitfalls.

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Frei, Karin Margarita
    Howcroft, Rachel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gummesson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Frei, Robert
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Diet and mobility among Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Motala (Sweden) - The isotope perspective2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 17, p. 904-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent excavations at the sites of Strandvägen and Kanaljorden in Motala, Eastern Central Sweden, have unearthed complex and varied funerary remains from the Mesolithic. The two sites are situated on opposite banks of the river Motala Ström. While geographically close and roughly covering the same time span (c. 8000–7000 cal. BP), the funerary remains reveal differences and similarities in the treatment of the dead between the two localities. While at Strandvägen human bones were mostly found either scattered along the river bed or in inhumation graves, Kanaljorden contains wetland depositions of disarticulated skulls. We have conducted multi-isotope analyses of δ13C, δ15N, δ34S and 87Sr/86Sr of human and animal remains with the aim of reconstructing the dietary patterns, geographic provenance and mobility of the interred. A series of faunal reference samples and, in the case of 87Sr/86Sr, soil samples have been analysed in order to establish relevant isotopic baselines. The results show a protein intake dominated by aquatic resources, probably consisting of both freshwater and marine fish in varied proportions. The strontium isotope data indicate an interesting distinction between the individuals buried on either side of the river Motala Ström. Five out of six sampled individuals from Strandvägen have isotope ratios consistent with a local provenance, whereas ratios from seven out of eight Kanaljorden individuals indicate a non-local origin. The δ34S analysis proved problematic as a majority of the samples appear to be affected by diagenesis. This is probably the result of contamination by exogenous sulphur from surrounding fluvial and lacustrine sediments, as has previously been reported from other waterlogged sites.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Dietary life histories in Stone Age Northern Europe2013In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 288-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present here a framework for using stable isotope analysis of bone and teeth to study individual life history. A sampling strategy and analytical approach for stable carbon and nitrogen analysis of bone and dentine collagen optimised for intra-individual purposes is put forward. The rationale behind this strategy, various requirements and constrains, and recommendations on how to modify it according to variations in material and analytical instrumentation, are discussed and explained in detail. Based on intra-individual data for 131 human individuals from Mesolithic and Neolithic sites in Northern Europe, we consider the sources and various kinds of variation one is likely to find, and how the data can be explained and transformed into an archaeologically meaningful interpretation. It is concluded that the use of stable isotope analysis to trace individual life history is not limited to carefully excavated, neatly preserved, single burials with articulate skeletal remains. Even collective burials, disturbed graves, disarticulated human remains in cultural layers, or other depositions that deviate from what is often considered as a proper burial, offer the possibility to look at individual life biographies.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kanstrup, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schoultz, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Olofsson, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Same island, different diet: Cultural evolution of food practice on Öland, Sweden, from the Mesolithic to the Roman Period2008In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 520-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mesolithic–Neolithic transition in north-west Europe has been described as rapid and uniform, entailing a swift shift from the use of marine and other wild resources to domesticated terrestrial resources. Here, we approach the when, what and how of this transition on a regional level, using empirical data from Öland, an island in the Baltic Sea off the Swedish east coast, and also monitor changes that occurred after the shift. Radiocarbon dating and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of bones and teeth from 123 human individuals, along with faunal isotope data from 27 species, applying to nine sites on Öland and covering a time span from the Mesolithic to the Roman Period, demonstrate a great diversity in food practices, mainly governed by culture and independent of climatic changes. There was a marked dietary shift during the second half of the third millennium from a mixed marine diet to the use of exclusively terrestrial resources, interpreted as marking the large-scale introduction of farming. Contrary to previous claims, this took place at the end of the Neolithic and not at the onset. Our data also show that culturally induced dietary transitions occurred continuously throughout prehistory. The availability of high-resolution data on various levels, from intra-individual to inter-population, makes stable isotope analysis a powerful tool for studying the evolution of food practices.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Papmehl-Dufay, Ludvig
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Cultural interaction and change: a multi-isotopic approach to the Neolithization in coastal areas2013In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 430-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on data from the megalithic tomb in Resmo on oland in the Baltic Sea, we use a multi-isotopic approach, involving the systematic treatment and modelling of extensive human and faunal isotopic data (C-14, C-13, N-15, S-34 and Sr-87/Sr-86), along with archaeological contextual evidence, to study change and interaction. The fact that people utilize aquatic resources necessitates modelling of the sulphur and strontium isotope data, to prevent the aquatic contribution from obscuring the local terrestrial signal. It was possible to demonstrate how the people buried in Resmo went through dynamic changes in diet, mobility patterns and cultural identity during more than two millennia of burial practice: from the incipient farmers of the Funnel Beaker Culture, through the cultural encounters and transitions during the Middle Neolithic, to the newcomers furthering intensified agriculture, trade and metal craftsmanship during the Bronze Age.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Zagorska, I
    Do dogs eat like humans?: Marine stable isotope signals in dog teeth from inland Zvejnieki2002In: Mesolithic on the Move: Papers presented at the Sixth International Conference on The Mesolithic in Europe, Stockholm 2000, Stockholm: International Conference on the Mesolithic in Europe , 2002, p. 160-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av kvinnan i Gransjögraven,Gransjön, Frostviken sn, Jämtland2012Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol-, kväve- och svavelisotopanalyser av humana individer, samt animalt skelettmaterial från Götes mack, Sigtuna Raä 195:1, Sigtuna stad, Uppland2016Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol-, kväve- och svavelisotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Dominikanerkonventet, Västerås stad, Västmanland2014Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol-, kväve- och svavelisotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Önsvala, Staffanstorp sn, Skåne2013Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol-, kväve- och svavelisotopanalyser av sex humana individer, samt animalt skelettmaterial från Dominikanerkonventet, Västerås stad, Västmanland2016Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Svestad, Asgeir
    Food and Cultural Traits in Coastal Northern Finnmark in the 14th-19th Centuries2019In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we used stable isotope analysis and radiocarbon dating to study diet, mobility and chronology in two late medieval/historical coastal populations in northern Norway. We have shown that the individuals buried at Kirkegardsoya date between 1331 and 1953 cal AD and had a homogenous marine diet, whereas the individuals buried at Gullholmen had a more heterogeneous diet, consisting of both terrestrial and marine proteins and date between 1661 and 1953 cal AD. We have demonstrated that reindeer protein was not an important part of their diet, and also discussed the importance of correcting for the marine reservoir effect in populations with a coastal subsistence. Our interpretation is that individuals buried at Kirkegardsoya primarily belonged to a Coastal Sami community, although Norwegians with a similar diet (and likely comprising a minor population in the area) cannot be ruled out. The more varied diet and mobility at Gullholmen could, as predicted, indicate that these individuals may have had a more diverse cultural affinity.

  • 25.
    Fornander, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wild at heart: Approaching Pitted Ware identity, economy and cosmology through stable isotopes in skeletal material from the Neolithic site Korsnäs in Eastern Central Sweden2008In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 281-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Middle Neolithic Pitted Ware Culture on the Baltic Sea islands comprised a common identity distinguished, in part, by an almost exclusively marine diet. Based on evidence from the first stable isotope analysis on Pitted Ware skeletal material from the Eastern Central Swedish mainland, we suggest that this identity was shared by PWC groups in the archipelago of the west side of the Baltic. Fifty-six faunal and 26 human bone and dentine samples originating from the Pitted Ware site Korsnäs in Södermanland, Sweden were analysed, and the data clearly shows that the diet of the Korsnäs people was marine, predominantly based on seal. The isotope data further indicate that the pig bones found in large quantities on the site emanate from wild boar rather than domestic pigs. The large representation of pig on several Pitted Ware sites, which cannot be explained in terms of economy, is interpreted as the results of occasional hunting of and ritual feasting on wild boar, indicating that the animal held a prominent position, alongside seal, in the hunting identity and cosmology of the Pitted Ware people. Further, eleven new radiocarbon dates are presented, placing the Korsnäs site, with a large probability, within Middle Neolithic A.

  • 26.
    Fornander, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Andersson, Per
    Identifying mobility in populations with mixed marine/terrestrial diets: strontium isotope analysis of skeletal material from a passage grave in Resmo, Öland, Sweden2015In: Forging identities: the mobility of culture in bronze age Europe. Report from a Marie Curie project 2009-2012 with concluding conference at Aarhus University, Moesgaard 2012 / [ed] Paulina Suchowska-Ducke, Samantha Scott Reiter, Helle Vandkilde, Oxford: British Archaeological Reports , 2015, p. 183-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strontium isotope analysis of skeletal material as a means to reconstruct prehistoric residential patterns has previously mainly been applied to populations with terrestrial diets. Here we present a model for populations with mixed marine/terrestrial diets, which is based on two-component mixing of strontium isotopes. Applying this model, we can estimate the original strontium isotope value of the terrestrial component of the diet. Accordingly it is possible to identify non-local individuals even if they had a mixed marine/terrestrial diet. The model is applied to tooth enamel samples representing nine individuals recovered from a passage grave in Resmo, on the island of Öland in the Baltic Sea, where at least five non-local individuals, representing at least two different geographical regions of origin, were identified. Non-local individuals were more frequent during the Bronze Age than during previous phases.

  • 27.
    Glykou, Aikaterini
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schmitt, M.
    Kooijman, E.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Intra- and inter-tooth variation in strontium isotope ratios from prehistoric seals by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry2018In: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 0951-4198, E-ISSN 1097-0231, Vol. 32, no 15, p. 1215-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RationaleStrontium isotope ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86) in modern-day marine environments are considered to be homogeneous (0.7092). However, in the Baltic Sea, the Sr ratios are controlled by mixing seawater and continental drainage from major rivers discharging into the Baltic. This pilot study explores if variations in Sr can be detected in marine mammals from archaeological sites in the Baltic Sea. Methods(87)Sr/Sr-86 ratios were measured in tooth enamel from three seal species by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS). The method enables micro-sampling of solid materials. This is the first time that the method has been applied to marine samples from archaeological collections. ResultsThe analyses showed inter-tooth Sr-87/Sr-86 variation suggesting that different ratios can be detected in different regions of the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, the intra-tooth variation suggests possible different geographic origin or seasonal movement of seals within different regions in the Baltic Sea through their lifetime. ConclusionsThe method was successfully applied to archaeological marine samples showing that: (1) the Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio in marine environments is not uniform, (2) Sr-87/Sr-86 differences might reflect differences in ecology and life history of different seal species, and (3) archaeological mobility studies based on Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios in humans should therefore be evaluated together with diet reconstruction.

  • 28. Günther, Torsten
    et al.
    Malmström, Helena
    Svensson, Emma M.
    Omrak, Ayca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sánchez-Quinto, Federico
    Kılınç, Gülşah M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Uppsala University, Sweden; Middle East Technical University, Turkey.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    Edlund, Hanna
    Munters, Arielle R.
    Coutinho, Alexandra
    Simões, Luciana G.
    Vicente, Mario
    Sjölander, Anders
    Jansen Sellevold, Berit
    Jørgensen, Roger
    Claes, Peter
    Shriver, Mark D.
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Netea, Mihai G.
    Apel, Jan
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Skar, Birgitte
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Population genomics of Mesolithic Scandinavia: Investigating early postglacial migration routes and high-latitude adaptation2018In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 16, no 1, article id e2003703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavia was one of the last geographic areas in Europe to become habitable for humans after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, the routes and genetic composition of these postglacial migrants remain unclear. We sequenced the genomes, up to 57x coverage, of seven hunter-gatherers excavated across Scandinavia and dated from 9,500-6,000 years before present (BP). Surprisingly, among the Scandinavian Mesolithic individuals, the genetic data display an east-west genetic gradient that opposes the pattern seen in other parts of Mesolithic Europe. Our results suggest two different early postglacial migrations into Scandinavia: initially from the south, and later, from the northeast. The latter followed the ice-free Norwegian north Atlantic coast, along which novel and advanced pressure-blade stone-tool techniques may have spread. These two groups met and mixed in Scandinavia, creating a genetically diverse population, which shows patterns of genetic adaptation to high latitude environments. These potential adaptations include high frequencies of low pigmentation variants and a gene region associated with physical performance, which shows strong continuity into modern-day northern Europeans.

  • 29.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Amningsmönster under järnålder på södra Öland2015In: Grävda minnen: Från Skedemosse till Sandby borg / [ed] Kjell-Håkan Arnell, Ludvig Papmehl-Dufay, Kalmar: Kalmar läns museum, Länsstyrelsen Kalmar län , 2015, p. 72-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Conformity in diversity? Isotopic investigations of infant feeding practices in two Iron Age populations from southern Öland, Sweden2012In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 149, no 2, p. 217-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results of a study of infant diet at two Iron Age sites on the island of Öland, Sweden. The cemetery at Bjärby contained a large number of subadults who had survived the earliest years of life, whereas most individuals at Triberga had died by 6 months of age. To investigate whether differences in infant feeding could explain the different mortality rates, the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur stable isotope ratios of bone and tooth dentin collagen from the two sites were analyzed. Twenty-two samples from Triberga and 102 from Bjärby yielded data that could be included in the carbon and nitrogen analysis. Twelve samples from Triberga and 42 from Bjärby were included in the sulfur analysis. The results for carbon (δ13C: Triberga X = -18.8, s.d. = 1.1; Bjärby X = -19.8, s.d. = 0.4), nitrogen (δ 15N: Triberga X = 12.9, s.d. = 1.5; Bjärby X = 13.4, s.d. = 1.4), and sulfur (δ34S: Triberga X = 8.1, s.d. = 1.1; Bjärby X = 5.8, s.d. = 1.3) suggest that diet was broadly similar at both sites and based on terrestrial resources. At Bjärby, females and high-status individuals consumed higher-trophic level protein than other males from early childhood onward. There was some indication that the contribution of marine resources to the diet may also have differed between the sexes at Triberga. No consistent differences in breast milk intake were observed between the two sites, but there was substantial variation at each. This variation may reflect an influence of gender and social status on infant feeding decisions.

  • 31.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of Tromso, Norway.
    Infant feeding practices at the Pitted Ware Culture site of Ajvide, Gotland2014In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 42, p. 42-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The infant feeding practices used at the Pitted Ware Culture (PWC) site of Ajvide on the Baltic island of Gotland were investigated using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio analysis. The PWC weremarine hunters with a seal-based economy who lived in the Baltic region during the Middle Neolithic, and were contemporary with the farming Funnel Beaker and Boat Axe Cultures. The carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen from adult females (14 individuals) and bone and dentine collagen from subadult individuals (23 individuals, 55 samples) from Ajvide were analysed. The results showed that the majority of infants continued breastfeeding into the third or fourth year of life. There was some variation in the types of supplementary foods used and the timing of their introduction, perhaps due to seasonal variation in the availability of different resources. One infant, a neonate, had carbonand nitrogen isotope ratios indicative of a much more terrestrial diet than usually consumed by the PWC, suggesting contact with the Neolithic farming populations in the Baltic region. Comparison of the results from Ajvide to those from other PWC sites in the Baltic region reveals that both adult and subadult dietary practices differed slightly between sites.

  • 32.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Milky Way: The implications of using animal milkproducts in infant feeding2012In: Anthropozoologica, ISSN 0761-3032, E-ISSN 2107-0881, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 31-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal milks have been used in infant feeding for at least a few millennia, but this can only have become a common practice after the domestication of dairy animals during the Neolithic. Neolithic population increase has often been attributed to the effect of a reduction in breastfeeding duration on female fertility. It is possible, therefore, that animal milks were first introduced to the infant diet at this time as a replacement for the lost breastmilk. Milks are complex liquids and are species specific. The consumption of the milk of one species by the infants of another thus has implications for the welfare of those infants. This paper reviews some of the differences between the milks of three ruminant species and human milk and discusses what the health consequences of introducing these animal milks to the infant diet are likely to have been. It is argued that, except in extreme circumstances, animal milks would fail to adequately compensate for the reduction in breastmilk consumption. Fermented milk products could however have been valuable weaning foods if consumed alongside other iron-rich products.

  • 33.
    Lidén, K.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Nordqvist, B
    Götherström, A
    Bendixen, E
    “The wet and the wild followed by the dry and the tame” – or did they occur at the same time?: Diet in Mesolithic–Neolithic southern Sweden2004In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 78, no 299, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeology vs. archaeological science: Do we have a case?2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Mångkultur redan på stenåldern2009In: Forskning och framsteg, ISSN 0015-7937, no 7, p. 44-47Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Response to comments: Archaeology vs. Archaeological Science2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 49-50Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Walking on the wild side: On cultural diversity and the Pitted Ware Culture along the Swedish east coast during the Middle Neolithic2007In: From Stonehenge to the Baltic: Living with cultural diversity in the third millennium BC, Archaeopress, Oxford , 2007, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There was a rich diversity in material culture during the Middle Neolithic in Scandinavia and the Baltic region, and the archaeological remains have therefore generally been labelled as one out of several parallel archaeological cultures. What these “cultures” represent, and whether or not they correspond to actual groups of people has long been debated. Particularly the Pitted Ware Culture has given rise to various hypotheses. By applying stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses on human and faunal skeletal remains from Pitted Ware contexts, and to compare these data with stable isotope data derived from sites of other cultural attribution, we were able to demonstrate that the Pitted Ware Culture in fact represents a separate group of people, not only distinguished by their characteristic pottery, but also by their food culture, which was mainly based on the utilization of seal. On the basis of stable isotope, radiocarbon and archaeological data, various other hypotheses regarding the Pitted Ware Culture and its stance vis-à-vis the Funnel Beaker and Battle Axe (Corded Ware) Cultures could thus be refuted.

  • 38.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lindholm, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Breastfeeding patterns and diet in five 17th-century children from Sund, Åland Islands2012In: Stones, Bones & Thoughts: Festschrift in Honour of Milton Núñez / [ed] Sirpa Niinimäki, Anna-Kaisa Salmi, Jari-Matti Kuusela, Jari Okkonen, Oulu: [Milton Núñezin juhlakirjan toimituskunta] , 2012, p. 166-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Breastfeeding patterns and diet in five 17th-century children from Sund on the Åland Islands were studied by means of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of bone and teeth. Although all individuals derive from the same burial context, the high-status location inside the church, they nevertheless show differences in diet and breastfeeding patterns. We found two dietary groups: one consuming almost exclusively terrestrial protein resources, and the other a mixture of marine and terrestrial resources, with a predominance of terrestrial protein. The individual breastfeeding patterns show great variability – from no breastfeeding at all, to exclusive breastfeeding for ten months. Weaning varied both with regard to onset and pace. The overall diet indicates that the analysed individuals originate from two different environments, possibly mainland Åland and the outer archipelago, respectively.

  • 39.
    Linderholm, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Increasing mobility at the Neolithic/ Bronze Age transition – sulphur isotope evidence from Öland, Sweden2014In: Internet Archaeology, ISSN 1363-5387, E-ISSN 1363-5387, Vol. 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this investigation is to look at the use of various aquatic, in this case marine, resources in relation to mobility during the Neolithic and Bronze Age periods. On the island of Öland, in the Baltic Sea, different archaeological cultures are represented in the form of material culture and skeletal remains at three sites. We have analysed δ34S values in human remains representing 36 individuals, as well as faunal remains. We investigated intra-individual patterns of mobility from childhood to adulthood, primarily focusing on a passage grave. Taking into account previously published dietary data that demonstrate a wide range of dietary practices involving aquatic resources, we applied a model to estimate the contribution of δ34S from terrestrial protein, to separate mobility from dietary changes, thereby identifying individuals who changed residence, as well as individuals with non-local origins. Evidence of mobility could be demonstrated at two sites. For the third site the consistently marine diet inhibits inferences on mobility based on δ34S analysis. Chronologically, the frequency of non-locals was highest during the Bronze Age, when the diet was very uniform and based on terrestrial resources.

  • 40. Linderholm, Anna
    et al.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Mörth, Carl-Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Increasing mobility at the Neolithic/Bronze Age transition: sulphur isotope evidence from Öland, SwedenIn: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Naumann, Elise
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Faculty of Humanities.
    Krzewinska, Maja
    Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo,.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Slaves as burial gifts in Viking Age Norway?: Evidence from stable isotope and Ancient DNA analyses2013In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 41, p. 533-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten Viking Age individuals from the northern Norwegian site at Flakstad were analysed for δ13C, δ15N and ancient mitochondrial DNA fragments. The material derives from both single and multiple burials with individuals treated in different ways. The genetic analyses show that the individuals buried together were unlikely to be maternally related, and stable isotope analyses suggest different strata of society. It is, therefore, suggested that slaves may have been offered as grave gifts at Flakstad. A comparison with the remaining population from single graves shows that the presumed slaves had a diet similar to that of the common population, whereas the high status individuals in multiple graves had a diet different from both slaves and the common population. The results provide an insight into the subsistence of different social groups in a Viking Age society, exposing unexpected patterns of living conditions and food distribution.

  • 42. Skar, Birgitte
    et al.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Sellevold, Berit
    A submerged Mesolithic grave site reveals remains of the first Norwegian seal hunters2016In: Marine Ventures: Archaeological Perspectives on Human-Sea Relations / [ed] Hein Bjartmann Bjerck et al., Sheffield: Equinox Publishing, 2016, p. 225-239Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Submerged Mesolithic settlement sites and graves have shown to provide repositories of well-preserved organic remains particularly in the Baltic Sea region. Although marine Stone Age archaeology In Norway is in its infancy it has already led to discoveries that shed new light on Middle Mesolithic livelihood and death, so far unknown from the terrestrial archaeological record. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) analyzed from individuals from submerged burials on the Hummervikholmen site in southern Norway reveal that the deceased had lived off a diet consisting of more than 80% marine protein from the highest trophic level. The find circumstances of the three to five individuals, found west of Kristiansand, confirm the existence of a Middle Mesolithic burial tradition and indicate that this hunter-gatherer population in southern Norway possessed boat technology. The finds highlight a period during the Middle Mesolithic of Norway where cultural change so far has only been indicated in the lithic technology.

  • 43. Webb, Emily C.
    et al.
    Honch, Noah V.
    Dunn, Philip J. H.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Evershed, Richard P.
    Compound-specific amino acid isotopic proxies for detecting freshwater resource consumption2015In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 63, p. 104-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Of central importance to palaeodietary reconstruction is a clear understanding of relative contributions of different terrestrial (i.e., C3 vs. C4 plants) and aquatic (i.e., freshwater vs. marine) resources to human diet. There are, however, significant limitations associated with the ability to reconstruct palaeodiet using bulk collagen stable isotope compositions in regions where diverse dietary resources are available. Recent research has determined that carbon-isotope analysis of individual amino acids has considerable potential to elucidate dietary protein source where bulk isotopic compositions cannot. Using δ13CAA values for human and faunal remains from Zvejnieki, Latvia (8th – 3rd millennia BCE), we test several isotopic proxies focused on distinguishing freshwater protein consumption from both plant-derived and marine protein consumption. We determined that the Δ13CGly-Phe and Δ13CVal-Phe proxies can effectively discriminate between terrestrial and aquatic resource consumption, and the relationship between essential δ13CAA values and the Δ13CGly-Phe and Δ13CVal-Phe proxies can differentiate among the four protein consumption groups tested here. Compound-specific amino acid carbon-isotope dietary proxies thus enable an enhanced understanding of diet and resource exploitation in the past, and can elucidate complex dietary behaviour.

  • 44. Webb, Emily C.
    et al.
    Honch, Noah V.
    Dunn, Philip J. H.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of Oxford, UK.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Evershed, Richard P.
    Compound-specific amino acid isotopic proxies for distinguishing between terrestrial and aquatic resource consumption2018In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compound-specific amino acid carbon-isotope compositions have shown particular promise for elucidating dietary behaviors in complex environmental contexts, and may also be able to mitigate the effect of many of the limitations inherent to palaeodietary reconstructions. Here, we investigate the efficacy of compound-specific amino acid isotopic proxies in characterizing the consumption of different dietary protein sources using amino acid carbon-isotope compositions for humans and fauna from Rössberga (Early to Middle Neolithic), Köpingsvik (Mesolithic and Middle Neolithic), and Visby (Medieval Period), Sweden. We also assess the explanatory capabilities of an isotopic mixing model when used with essential amino acid carbon-isotope compositions of humans and local fauna. All three isotopic proxies distinguished among humans from the three sites consistently and informatively, and were able to enhance the broad interpretations made using bulk isotopic compositions. The mixing model palaeodietary reconstruction revealed considerable diversity in relative protein source contributions among individuals at both Köpingsvik and Visby. Comparing the mixing model for bulk carbon- and nitrogen-isotope compositions to the model for essential amino acid isotopic compositions further demonstrated the likelihood of underestimation and overestimation of marine protein consumption for both aquatic-dominant and mixed marine-terrestrial diets when using bulk isotopic compositions.

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