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  • 1.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Contemporary Research on European Fertility: Perspectives and Developments2004In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, no 3, p. 1-14Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a collection of related studies on different aspects of research on European fertility and family dynamics. The authors who have contributed to this special Volume presented their papers at a working party at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, April 2004. This collection has been produced in honor of Jan M. Hoem for his 65th birthday. It provides an overview of important approaches to, and relevant topics of European fertility research, as well as a number of case studies researching European fertility. In this introduction, we first give a brief summary of the present state of arts in fertility research in Europe, and we then proceed with an overview of the articles of the Volume.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Rönsen, Marit
    Knudsen, Lisbeth
    Lappegård, Trude
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Skrede, Kari
    Teschner, Kathrin
    Vikat, Andres
    Cohort fertility patterns in the Nordic countries2009In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 20, no 14, p. 313-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous analyses of period fertility suggest that the trends of the Nordic countries are sufficiently similar to speak of a common "Nordic fertility regime". We investigate whether this assumption can be corroborated by comparing cohort fertility patterns in the Nordic countries. We study cumulated and completed fertility of Nordic birth cohorts based on the childbearing histories of women born in 1935 and later derived from the population registers of Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. We further explore childbearing behaviour by women’s educational attainment. The results show remarkable similarities in postponement and recuperation between the countries. Median childbearing age is about 2−3 years higher in the 1960−64 cohort than in the 1950−54 cohort, but the younger cohort recuperates the fertility level of the older cohort at ages 30 and above. A similar pattern of recuperation can be observed for highly educated women as compared to women with less education, resulting in small differences in completed fertility across educational groups. Another interesting finding is that of a positive relationship between educational level and the final number of children when women who become mothers at similar ages are compared. Despite some differences in the levels of childlessness, country differences in fertility outcome are generally small. The cohort analyses thus support the notion of a common Nordic fertility regime.

  • 3. Bertram, Hans
    et al.
    Bujard, Martin
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ostner, Ilona
    Spiess, C. Katharina
    Familienpolitik für Kinder und Eltern2012In: Zukunft mit Kindern. Fertilität und gesellschaftliche Entwicklung in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz / [ed] Günther Stock et al., Munich: Campus Verlag, 2012, p. 198-293Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4. Caporali, Arianna
    et al.
    Klüsener, Sebastian
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Krapf, Sandra
    Grigorieva, Olga
    Kostova, Dora
    The Contextual Database of the Generations and Gender Programme: Concept, content, and research examples2016In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 35, p. 229-252, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Differences in demographic behaviours across countries and subnational regions have stimulated interest in studying the relationships between individual characteristics and the contexts in which individuals are embedded. Analytical approaches that include contextual indicators in statistical analyses of demographic behaviour need well-documented comparative data at the national and the subnational regional level. The Contextual Database (CDB) of the Generations and Gender Programme (GGP; http://www.ggp-i.org/data/ggp-contextual-database) supports such analyses by providing comparative data on demographic and socio-economic contexts in up to 60 countries in Europe, North America, Asia, and Oceania.

    Objective: This paper presents conceptual considerations and an overview of the content and the functionality of the CDB. Research examples illustrate how data from this database can increase the analytical potential of demographic analyses.

    Conclusions: The CDB is a state-of-the-art research tool that provides well-documented comparative data at the national and the subnational regional level. Although it is conceptually linked to the Generations and Gender Survey (GGS), it can also be used to analyse data from other surveys, to study macro developments, and for teaching and lecturing. The CDB has a number of valuable features. First, it has a large number of indicators specifically geared towards demographic analyses, which provide extensive temporal and geographic coverage. Second, its dynamic web environment provides a high degree of transparency on data sources, as it offers meta-data for each individual entry. Finally, the CDB supports geocoding schemes that are used by the GGS and other surveys to denote region and country of residence.

  • 5.
    Hoem, Jan M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Aassve, A.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Baizán Munoz, P.
    Billari, Francesco
    Bocconi University, Milan, Italy.
    Engelhardt, H.
    Fürnkranz-Prskawetz, A.
    Hank, K.
    Huinink, J.
    Kohler, H.-P.
    Kohlmann, A.
    Kreyenfeld, Michaela
    Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Vikat, Andres
    UN Economic Commission for Europe, Switzerland.
    Concepts for a second round of fertility and family surveys in Europe with particular attention paid to persons of reproductive/ working age2000In: Generations and gender programme: exploring future research and data collection options, New York; Geneva: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe/United Nations Population Fund , 2000, p. 59-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hoem, Jan M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Education and childlessness: The relationship between educational field, educational level, and childlessness among Swedish women born in 1955-592006In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 14, no 15, p. 331-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we extend the concept of educational attainment to cover the field of education taken in addition to the conventional level of education attained. Our empirical investigation uses register records containing childbearing and educational histories of an entire cohort of women born in Sweden (about a quarter-million individuals). This allows us to operate with a high number of educational field-and-level combinations (some sixty in all). It turns out that the field of education serves as an indicator of a woman’s potential reproductive behavior better than the mere level attained. We discover that in each field permanent childlessness increases some with the educational level, but that the field itself is the more important. In general, we find that women educated for jobs in teaching and health care are in a class of their own, with much lower permanent childlessness at each educational level than in any other major grouping. Women educated in arts and humanities or for religious occupations have unusually high fractions permanently childless. Our results cast doubt on the assumption that higher education per se must result in higher childlessness. In our opinion, several factors intrinsic and extrinsic to an educational system (such as its flexibility, its gender structure, and the manner in which education is hooked up to the labor market) may influence the relationship between education and childlessness, and we would not expect a simple, unidirectional relationship.

  • 7.
    Hoem, Jan M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Educational attainment and ultimate fertility among Swedish women born in 1955-592006In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 14, no 16, p. 381-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the second of two companion papers addressing the association between educational attainment and fertility for some sixty educational groups of Swedish women, defined according to field of education as well as level of education. The first paper is about childlessness and education, the present one about the mean number of children ever born. We find that ultimate fertility decreases somewhat with an increasing educational level, but its dependence on the field of education is much more impressive. In general, educational groups with relatively little childlessness also have relatively high ultimate fertility, and educational groups with much childlessness have relatively low ultimate fertility. In particular, women educated for the teaching or health-care professions have less childlessness and a higher ultimate fertility than others. Conversely, women with an education for esthetic or (non-teacher) humanist occupations have unusually high fractions childless and low ultimate fertility. Women with religious educations stand out by having very high fractions childless but quite ordinary mean ultimate fertility nevertheless; such women have very little childbearing outside of marriage. Women with research degrees have remarkably ordinary childbearing behavior; they do not forego motherhood to the extent that some theories would predict.

  • 8.
    Hoem, Jan M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Prskawetz, Alexia
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Autonomy or Conservative Adjustment?:The Effect of Public Policies and EducationalAttainment on Third Births in Austria, 1975-962001In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 249-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The standardized rate of third births declined by over 50 percent in Austria between the late 1970s and the mid-1990s. The third birth was also postponed gradually over the years until 1991-92, after which the tempo of childbearing suddenly increased in response to a change in the parental-leave policy. This new policy inadvertently favoured women who had their second or subsequent child shortly after their previous one. We cannot find any indication that the general decline in third births can be seen as a consequence of women's increasing independence from their husbands at the stage in life we study. Furthermore, it still seems to be more difficult to combine motherhood and labour-force participation in Austria than in Sweden, which is a leader in reducing this incompatibility. These developments reflect the tension between advancing gender equality and the dominance of traditional norms in Austria.

  • 9. Jalovaara, Marika
    et al.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Dahlberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Dommermuth, Lars
    Fallesen, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lappegård, Trude
    Education, Gender, and Cohort Fertility in the Nordic Countries2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Systematic comparisons of fertility developments based on education, gender and country context are rare. Using harmonized register data, we compare cohort total fertility (CTF) andultimatechildlessness by gender and educational attainment for cohorts bornbeginning in 1940 in four Nordic countries. CTF has remained fairly stable in all countries. Childlessness, which had been increasing, has plateaued except in Finland. Women’s negative educational gradient has vanished, while men’s positive gradient has persisted. The highest level of men’s childlessness appears among the less educated, revealing striking educational differences. Childlessness has increased among low-educated women but not among highly educated women. The educational gradient in women’s childlessness has shifted from positive to negative. Thus, we witness both a new gender similarity and widening social inequalities in childbearing in the Nordic welfare states. Low-educated citizens of both sexes have apparently become an increasingly marginalized segment with regard to childbearing.

  • 10.
    Marten, Carina
    et al.
    University Göttingen.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ostner, Ilona
    University Göttingen.
    Neue soziale Risiken, neue Politiken – Familienpolitischer Wandel in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz:  2012In: Soziale Welt, ISSN 0038-6073, Vol. 19, p. 115-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article traces the development of family policies in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland and discusses recent changes of family policies against within the framework "new social risk" perception and institutional changes.

  • 11.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bildung und Kinderlosigkeit in Österreich und in Schweden2009In: Zeitschrift für Familienforschung, ISSN 1437-2940, E-ISSN 2196-2154, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 286-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the association between educational level, educational line, and childlessness among Austrian and Swedish women born 1955-59. In both countries. In both countries women educated for teaching jobs or for health occupations have lower childlessness than women educated for other professions. However, childlessness by educational level differs markedly between the two countries. Swedish women with tertiary education have only slightly higher childlessness than women with lower educational attainment. In Austria, however, women with an education at high-school level or above remain significantly more often childless than women with a lower education.

  • 12.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Familienpolitik in Österreich - zwischen Beharrung und Veränderung2010In: Revue d'Allemagne et des pays de langue allemande, ISSN 0035-0974, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 57-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the development of the Austrian parental leave legislation since the 1950s. Parental leave policies lie at the intersection of employment, gender, and family policies and are thus central in shaping gender and social relationships in a society. They constitute some of the most controversially debated family policies in Austria ever since the amendment of family law and abortion legislation in the 1970s. This paper outlines the development of Austrian parental leave policies and sketches the parties' positions accompanying their development.

  • 13.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    RODINNÁ POLITIKA A PLODNOST V EVROPĚ:PRONATALITNÍ POLITIKA V SOUVISLOSTIS POLITIKOU GENDEROVOU, POLITIKOUZAMĚSTNANOSTI A OPATŘENÍMI TÝKAJÍCÍMISE PÉČE O DĚTI: Family Policies and Fertility in Europe: Fertility Policies at the Intersection of Gender Policies, Employment Policies and Care Policies2009In: Demografie, ISSN 0011-8265, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 235-251Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the relationship between family policies, fertility, employment and care. It suggests that similar family policies are likely to exert different effects in different contexts. It argues that a proper assessment of effects of family policies needs to take the combined spectrum of gender relations, welfare-state structures, and labor-market development into account.

  • 14.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Should governments in Europe be more aggressive in pushing for gender equality to raise fertility?: The second "No"2011In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 225-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues against the suggestion that governments should push for gender equality more aggressively in order to raise fertility. The paper presents a threefold "no" to this proposal. It takes issue with the goal of raising fertility, arguing that the claims that fertility must be increased are based on myths. It rejects a more aggressive pursuit of gender equality for demographic purposes, maintaining that this method preserves inequality. It warns against using gender equality for fertility purposes, stating that this narrows the realm of gender equality.

    The paper is based on a debate held at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, at which the author was asked to argue against the gender equality-fertility proposal. The other participants in the debate were Laurent Toulemon ("yes"), Dimiter Philipov ("no"), and Livia Oláh ("yes").

  • 15.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Welfare States, Family Policies, and Fertility in Europe2013In: The Demography of Europe / [ed] Gerda Neyer, Gunnar Andersson, Hill Kulu, Laura Bernardi, Christoph Bühler, Dordrecht: Springer Publishing Company, 2013, p. 29-53Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Neyer, Gerda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Kulu, Hill
    University of Liverpool.
    The Demography of Europe: Introduction2013In: The Demography of Europe / [ed] Gerda Neyer, Gunnar Andersson, Hill Kulu, Laura Bernardi, Christoph Bühler, Dordrecht: Springer, 2013, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Neyer, Gerda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Andersson, GunnarStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.Kulu, HillBernardi, LauraBühler, Christoph
    The Demography of Europe2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decades Europe has witnessed fundamental changes of its population dynamics and population structure. Fertility has fallen below replacement level in almost all European countries, while childbearing behavior and family formation have become more diverse. Life expectancy has increased in Western Europe for both females and males, but has been declining for men in some Eastern European countries. Immigration from non-European countries has increased substantially, as has mobility within Europe. These changes pose major challenges to population studies, as conventional theoretical assumptions regarding demographic behavior and demographic development seem unfit to provide convincing explanations of the recent demographic changes.

    This book, derived from the symposium on “The Demography of Europe” held at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany in November 2007 in honor of Professor Jan M. Hoem, brings together leading population researchers in the area of fertility, family, migration, life-expectancy, and mortality. The contributions present key issues of the new demography of Europe and discuss key research advances to understand the continent’s demographic development at the turn of the 21st century.

  • 18.
    Neyer, Gerda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bernardi, Laura
    Feminist Perspectives on Motherhood and Reproduction2011In: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, ISSN 0172-6404, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 162-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motherhood and reproduction have been at the core of the feminist discourse about women's rights ever since its onset. For the first and second feminist movements, the right to abortion and the public recognition of motherhood have been main issues in the discourse on reproduction. Since the last two decades of the 20th century, the potentials of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have opened up new venues of feminist discourse.

    In this paper we sketch the main feminist lines of argumentation regarding motherhood and reproduction since the 1970s, and we identify specific shifts in their recurrent issues. We argue that an essential contribution of feminism to the understanding of motherhood as a structuring category has been its insistence on the distinction between biological and social motherhood. Feminist discourse shows how ART has further decomposed biological motherhood and has altered the meaning of motherhood and reproduction. Feminist analysis maintains that despite the rhetoric of choice surrounding ART, these technologies have not increased women’s reproductive freedom. The decomposition of biological motherhood, the medical, legal, and commercial development of reproduction, and the change in the social perception of motherhood have rather established new forms of control over female reproduction.

  • 19.
    Neyer, Gerda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hoem, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Kinderlosigkeit, Bildungsrichtung und Bildungsniveau. Ergebnisse einer Untersuchung schwedischer und österreichischer Frauen der Geburtenjahrgänge 1955-592013In: Ein Leben ohne Kinder: Ausmass, Strukturen und Ursachen von Kinderlosigkeit / [ed] Dirk Konietzka, Michaela Kreyenfeld, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2013, 2, p. 101-135Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Der Zusammenhang zwischen Bildung und Kinderlosigkeit gehört seit langem zu den Kernthemen der demographischen Forschung. Studien zur Kinderlosigkeit in westlichen Ländern kommen im Allgemeinen zum gleichen Ergebnis: Je höher das erreichte Bildungsniveau, desto höher der Anteil kinderlos bleibender Frauen.

    Dieser Beitrag ist eine leicht geänderte Fassung von „Bildung und Kinderlosigkeit in Österreich und Schweden“ (Neyer 2009). Dieser ist wiederum eine Zusammenführung der Artikel „Education and childlessness: The relationship between educational field, educational level, and childlessness among Swedish women born in 1955-59“ (Hoem, Neyer und Andersson 2006a), „Education and permanent childlessness: Austria vs. Sweden. A research note“ (Neyer and Hoem 2008) und „Kinderlosigkeit, Bildungsrichtung und Bildungsniveau. Ergebnisse einer Untersuchung schwedischer Frauen der Geburtenjahrgänge 1955-59“ (Neyer, Hoem und Andersson 2007). Ein zu Hoem, Neyer und Andersson (2006a) komplementärer Artikel, „Educational attainment and ultimate fertility among Swedish women born in 1955-59“ (Hoem, Neyer und Andersson 2006b), untersucht den Zusammenhang zwischen Bildungsrichtung, Bildungsniveau und Kinderzahl. Alle erwähnten Artikel beinhalten zusätzliche Informationen, die wir aus Platzgründen in diesem Beitrag nicht präsentieren können.

  • 20.
    Neyer, Gerda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hoem, Jan M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Education and Permanent Childlessness: Austria vs. Sweden; a research note2008In: Demographic Challenges for the 21st Century: A State of the Art in Demography, Brussels: VUB Press, 2008, p. 91-112Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research note we extend our previous study of the association between educational attainment and permanent childlessness in Sweden (Hoem et al., 2006) to cover Austria, and we make comparisons between the two countries. In both investigations we have defined educational attainment in terms of both educational level and educational field. We find largely the same pattern of childlessness by educational field in both countries; in particular at each educational level women educated for teaching jobs or for health occupations typically have lower childlessness than other lines of education. However, for most groups childlessness is higher in Austria, and for academic educations it is much higher. We attribute these differences to institutional differences in the two countries which may bring about a different culture of reproductive behavior.

  • 21.
    Neyer, Gerda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hoem, Jan M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Education and Childlessness: The Influence of Educational Field and Educational Level on Childlessness among Swedish and Austrian Women2017In: Childlessness in Europe: Contexts, Causes, and Consequences / [ed] Michaela Kreyenfeld, Dirk Konietzka, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 183-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the question of how different institutional structures affect ultimate levels of childlessness. We compare rates of childlessness by educational field and educational level among women born in 1955–1959 in two different welfare states: Austria and Sweden. We find similar patterns of childlessness by educational field in both countries: i.e., women who have been educated to work in the education or health sector have lower rates of childlessness than women who have been educated to work in most other occupational fields. However, rates of childlessness by educational level differ markedly between the two countries: Austrian women with upper-secondary or tertiary education are significantly more likely to be childless than Swedish women with comparable levels of education and Austrian women with lower levels of education. We attribute these differences to the educational systems, the labour market structures, and the family policies of the two countries; which in Sweden promote equality across educational groups, and in Austria create cleavages between educational groups. We conclude with reflections on the implications of our results for demographic research on education and fertility.

  • 22.
    Neyer, Gerda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lappegard, Trude
    Vignoli, Daniele
    Gender Equality and Fertility: Which Equality Matters?2013In: European Journal of Population, ISSN 0168-6577, E-ISSN 1572-9885, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 245-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Does gender equality matter for fertility? Demographic findings on this issue are rather inconclusive. We argue that one reason for this is that the complexity of the concept of gender equality has received insufficient attention. Gender equality needs to be conceptualized in a manner that goes beyond perceiving it as mere sameness of distribution. It needs to include notions of gender equity and thus to allow for distinguishing between gender difference and gender inequality. We sketch three dimensions of gender equality related to employment, financial resources, and family work, which incorporate this understanding: (1) the ability to maintain a household; (2) agency and the capability to choose; and (3) gender equity in household and care work. We explore their impact on childbearing intentions of women and men using the European Generations and Gender Surveys. Our results confirm the need for a more nuanced notion of gender equality in studies on the relationship between gender equality on fertility. They show that there is no uniform effect of gender equality on childbearing intentions, but that the impact varies by gender and by parity.

  • 23. Valarino, Isabel
    et al.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Haas, Linda L.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Exploring Leave Policy Preferences: A Comparison of Austria, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States2018In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 118-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses preferences regarding leave length, gender division of leave,and leave financing in four countries with different welfare-state and leaveregimes. Embedded in a gender perspective, institutional, self-interest, and ideationaltheoretical approaches are used to explore the factors shaping individuals’preferences (ISSP 2012 data). Findings show dramatic cross-country differences,suggesting the institutional dimension is most strongly related to leave policy preferences.Self-interest and values concerning gender relations and state responsibilityare also important correlates. The study identifies mismatches between leavepreferences, entitlements, and uptake, with implications for policy reform and thegendered division of parenting.

  • 24.
    Vikat, Andres
    et al.
    UN Economic Commission for Europe, Switzerland.
    Spéder, Zsolt
    Demographic Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary.
    Beets, Gijs
    Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute, Netherlands.
    Billari, Francesco
    Bocconi University, Milan, Italy.
    Bühler, Christoph
    Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany.
    Desesquelles, Aline
    Institut national d'études démographiques, France.
    Fokkema, Tineke
    Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute, Netherlands.
    Hoem, Jan M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    MacDonald, Alphonse
    UN Economic Commission for Europe, Switzerland.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Pailhé, Ariane
    Institut national d´études démographiques (INED), France.
    Pinnelli, Antonella
    Università degli Studi di Roma "La Sapienza", Italy.
    Solaz, Anne
    Institut national d´études démographiques (INED), France.
    Generations and Gender Survey (GGS): Towards a better understanding ofrelationships and processes in the life course2007In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 17, no 14, p. 389-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Generations and Gender Survey (GGS) is one of the two pillars of the Generations and Gender Programme designed to improve understanding of demographic and social development and of the factors that influence these developments. This article describes how the theoretical perspectives applied in the survey, the survey design and the questionnaire are related to this objective. The key features of the survey include panel design, multidisciplinarity, comparability, context-sensitivity, inter-generational and gender relationships. The survey applies the life course approach, focussing on the processes of childbearing, partnership dynamics, home leaving, and retiring. The selection of topics for data collection mainly follows the criterion of theoretically grounded relevance to explaining one or more of the mentioned processes. A large portion of the survey deals with economic aspects of life, such as economic activity, income, and economic well-being; a comparably large section is devoted to values and attitudes. Other domains covered by the survey include gender relationships, household composition and housing, residential mobility, social networks and private transfers, education, health, and public transfers. The third chapter of the article describes the motivations for their inclusion. The GGS questionnaire is designed for a face-to-face interview. It includes the core that each participating country needs to implement in full, and four optional sub-modules on nationality and ethnicity, on previous partners, on intentions of breaking up, and on housing, respectively. The participating countries are encouraged to include also the optional sub-modules to facilitate comparative research on these topics.

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