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  • 1.
    Fredriksson, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Åslund, Olof
    Edin, Per-Anders
    Dept. of Economics, Uppsala University.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Peers, Neighborhoods, and Immigrant Student Achievement – Evidence from a Placement Policy2011In: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, ISSN 1945-7782, E-ISSN 1945-7790, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 67-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine to what extent immigrant school performance is affected by the characteristics of the neighborhoods that they grow up in. We address this issue using a refugee placement policy that provides exogenous variation in the initial place of residence in Sweden. The main result is that school performance is increasing in the number of highly educated adults sharing the subject's ethnicity. A standard deviation increase in the fraction of high-educated in the assigned neighborhood raises compulsory school GPA by 0.8 percentile ranks. Particularly for disadvantaged groups, there are also long-run effects on educational attainment. (JEL I21, J15, R23)

  • 2.
    Golsteyn, Bart H. H.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Adolescent time preferences predict lifetime outcomes2014In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 124, no 580, p. F739-F761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationship between time preferences and lifetime social and economic outcomes. We use a Swedish longitudinal data set that links information from a large survey on children's time preferences at age 13 to administrative registers spanning over five decades. Our results indicate a substantial adverse relationship between high discount rates and school performance, health, labour supply and lifetime income. Males and high-ability children gain significantly more from being future oriented. These discrepancies are largest regarding outcomes later in life. We also show that the relationship between time preferences and long-run outcomes operates through early human capital investments.

  • 3.
    Golsteyn, Bart H.H.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tidspreferenser och långsiktiga utfall2013Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Golsteyn, Bart H.H.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Time preferences and lifetime outcomes2013Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Golsteyn, Bart H.H.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Time Preferences and Lifetime Outcomes2013Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Bör p-piller subventioneras? Konsekvenser för barnafödande, utbildning och arbetsmarknad2009In: Ekonomisk Debatt, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Putting teenagers on the pill: The consequences of subsidized contraception2012Report (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rätt att subventionera p-piller för ungdomar: Replik i DN-debatt, Dagens Nyheter 2009-09-202009Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Youth Unemployment and Crime: New Lessons Exploring Longitudinal Register Data2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the link between youth unemployment and crime using a unique combination of labor market and conviction data spanning the entire Swedish working-age population over an extended period. The empirical analysis reveals large and statistically significant effects of unemployment on several types of crime. The magnitude of the effect is similar across different subgroups of the population. In contrast to most previous studies, the results suggest that joblessness explain a meaningful portion of why male youths are overrepresented among criminal offenders. I discuss reasons for the discrepancy in the results and show that that the use of aggregated measures of labor market opportunities in past studies is likely to capture offsetting general equilibrium effects. Contrary to predictions by economic theory the effect of unemployment on crime is not mediated by income. Instead, an analysis of crimes committed during weekdays versus weekends provides suggestive evidence that unemployment increases the time that individuals have to engage in crime.

  • 10.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Edin, P-A
    Fredriksson, P.
    Åslund, O.
    Påverkar bostadssegregationen flyktingbarns skolresultat?2009In: Søkelys på arbeidslivet, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 379-389Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Edin, Per-Anders
    Dept. of Economics, Uppsala University.
    Åslund, Olof
    IFAU, Uppsala University.
    Fredriksson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Peers, neighborhoods and immigrant student achievement - evidence from a placement policy2010Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hall, Caroline
    Education policy and early fertility: Lessons from an expansion of upper secondary schooling2013In: Economics of Education Review, ISSN 0272-7757, E-ISSN 1873-7382, Vol. 37, p. 13-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the effects of education policy on early fertility. We study a major educational reform in Sweden in which vocational tracks in upper secondary school were prolonged from two to three years and the curricula were made more academic. Our identification strategy takes advantage of cross-regional and cross-time variation in the implementation of a pilot scheme preceding the reform in which several municipalities evaluated the new policy. The empirical analysis draws on rich population micro data. We find that women who enrolled in the new programs were significantly less likely to give birth early in life. There is however, no statistically significant effect on men's fertility decisions. Our results suggest that the social benefits of changes in education policy may extend beyond those usually claimed.

  • 13.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hall, Caroline
    IFAU, UCLS, Uppsala universitet.
    Education policy and early fertility: Lessons from an expansion of upper secondary schooling2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies effects of education policy on early fertility. We study a major educational reform in Sweden in which vocational tracks in upper secondary school were prolonged from two to three years and the curricula were made more academic. Our identification strategy takes advantage of cross-regional and cross-time variation in the implementation of a pilot scheme preceding the reform in which several municipalities evaluated the new policy. The empirical analysis draws on rich population micro data. We find that women who enrolled in the new program were significantly less likely to give birth early in life and that this effect is driven by women with higher opportunity costs of child rearing. There is however no statistically significant effect on men‟s fertility decisions. Our results suggest that the social benefits of changes in education policy may extend beyond those usually claimed.

  • 14.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hall, Caroline
    Sambandet mellan utbildning och att får barn tidigt2012In: Ekonomisk debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 3, p. 26-36Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Johansson, Per
    IFAU, Uppsala University, IZA.
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Income Inequality and Health: Lessons from a Refugee Residential Assignment Program2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the effect of income inequality on health for a group of particularly disadvantaged individuals: refugees. Our analysis draws on longitudinal hospitalization records coupled with a settlement policy where Swedish authorities assigned newly arrived refugees to their first area of residence. The policy was implemented in a way that provides a source of plausibly random variation in initial location. The results reveal no statistically significant effect of income inequality on the risk of being hospitalized. This finding holds also for most population subgroups and when separating between different types of diagnoses. Our estimates are precise enough to rule out large effects of income inequality on health.

  • 16.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Johansson, Per
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Income Inequality and Health: Lessons from a Refugee Residential Assignment Program2012In: Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 0167-6296, E-ISSN 1879-1646, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 617-629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the effect of income inequality on health for a group of particularly disadvantaged individuals: refugees. Our analysis draws on longitudinal hospitalization records coupled with a settlement policy where Swedish authorities assigned newly arrived refugees to their first area of residence. The policy was implemented in a way that provides a source of plausibly random variation in initial location. The results reveal no statistically significant effect of income inequality on the risk of being hospitalized. This finding holds also for most population subgroups and when separating between different types of diagnoses. Our estimates are precise enough to rule out large effects of income inequality on health.

  • 17.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Johansson, Per
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Inkomstskillnader och hälsa?: Lärdomar från den svenska flyktingutplaceringspolitiken2012In: Ekonomisk debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 5-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Alcohol availability and arime: lessons from liberalized weekend sales restrictions2014In: Journal of Urban Economics, ISSN 0094-1190, E-ISSN 1095-9068, Vol. 81, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate a large-scale experimental scheme implemented in Sweden whereby the state in the year 2000 required all alcohol retail stores in selected areas to stay open on Saturdays. The purpose of the scheme was to evaluate possible social consequences of expanding access to alcohol during weekends. Using rich individual level data we show that this increase in alcohol availability raised both alcohol use and crime.

  • 19.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Alcohol Availability and Crime: Lessons from Liberalized Weekend Sales Restrictions2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In February 2000, the Swedish state monopoly alcohol retail company launched a largescale experiment in which all stores in selected counties were allowed to keep open onSaturdays. We assess the effects on crime of this expansion in access to alcohol. Toisolate the impact of the experiment from other factors, we compare conviction rates inage cohorts above and below the national drinking age restriction in counties where theexperiment had been implemented, and contrast these differences to those in countiesthat still prohibited weekend alcohol commerce. Our analysis relies on extensiveindividual conviction data that have been merged to population registers. Afterdemonstrating that Saturday opening of alcohol shops significantly raised alcohol sales,we show that it also increased crime. The increase is confined to crimes committed onSaturdays and is driven by illegal activity among individuals with low ability and amongpersons with fathers that have completed at least some secondary education. Althoughthe increases in crime and alcohol sales were slightly higher during the initial phase ofthe experiment, our evidence suggests that both effects persist over time. Our analysisreveals that the social costs linked to the experiment exceed the monetary benefits. 

  • 20.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sverige; Institutet för arbetsmarknads- och utbildningspolitisk utvärdering (IFAU), Sverige.
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ankomst och härkomst - en ESO-rapport om skolresultat och bakgrund2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sverige har de senaste åren tagit emot ett rekordstort antal flyktingbarn, många i åldrarna 13 till 17 år. Eftersom en slutförd gymnasieutbildning är en nyckel till arbete för ungdomar i Sverige är det viktigt att även nyanlända ungdomar klarar skolan bra.

    I den här rapporten undersöker Hans Grönqvist och Susan Niknami skillnaderna i studieresultat, det så kallade studiegapet, mellan inrikes och utrikes födda elever. Författarna finner att gapet har ökat stadigt sedan slutet av 1980-talet, och mest markant runt 2008. Genom att studera samma elever både i årskurs 6 och 9 visar författarna att kunskapsskillnaderna åtminstone minskar med tiden i skolan. Mest avgörande för studiegapets storlek är föräldrarnas socioekonomiska situation. Om inrikes och utrikes födda elever hade haft föräldrar med liknande socioekonomisk bakgrund och bott i samma bostadsområde hade nästan hela skillnaden försvunnit. För att minska gapet mellan inrikes och utrikes födda barn behövs därför insatser som riktar sig både till de utrikes födda eleverna och till deras föräldrar.

  • 21.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nyanlända utrikes födda på och utanför arbetsmarknaden2012In: Med rätt att delta: nyanlända kvinnor och anhöriginvandrare på arbetsmarknaden : slutbetänkande, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2012, p. 355-390Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The School Achievements of Refugee Children: Lessons from Sweden2017In: Nordic Economic Policy Review, ISSN 1904-4526, E-ISSN 1904-8092, no 520, p. 159-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Refugee migration has been a major source of immigration to Sweden since the 1980s. This experience stands in contrast to that of many other countries in the OECD. As a result, the share of refugee pupils in school is relatively large in Sweden. Due to the historically small refugee populations in other countries and a lack of data that permits researchers to separate refugees from other types of immigrants little is known about the performance of refugee children in school. This paper documents the compulsory school achievements among refugee pupils since the late 1990s and finds that refugees on average perform significantly worse than other students. Controlling for parental socioeconomic background, however, substantially reduces the differences in school performance between refugees and other students. While school sorting only explains a small (albeit non-trivial) part of the gap, neighborhood of residence account for a considerable portion of the divide. In fact, controlling for parental background and neighborhood effects simultaneously almost eliminates the gap. While we cannot rule out the possibility that our results might be contaminated by unobserved factors, the results are consistent with the notion that improving the general socioeconomic situation of refugees should be of major importance in improving the school achievements of refugee students.

  • 23.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Niknami, Susan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Robling, Per Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Childhood Exposure to Segregation and Long-Run Criminal Involvement Evidence from the “Whole of Sweden” Strategy2015Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nilsson, J. Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Robling, Per Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Childhood Lead Exposure and Criminal Behavior: Lessons from the Swedish Phase-Out of Leaded Gasoline2014Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Grönvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Åslund, Olof
    Institute for Labor Market Policy Evaluation (IFAU).
    Family size and child outcomes: Is there really no trade-off?2010In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 130-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the impact of family size on intermediate and long-term outcomes using twin births as an exogenous source of variation in family size in an unusually rich dataset. Similar to recent studies, we find no evidence of a causal effect on long-term outcomes and show that not taking selection effects into account will likely overstate the effects. We do, however, find a small but significant negative impact of family size on grades in compulsory and secondary school among children who are likely to be vulnerable to further restrictions on parental investments.

  • 26.
    Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Great Recession, unemployment and suicide2015In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 110-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: How have suicide rates responded to the marked increase in unemployment spurred by the Great Recession? Our paper puts this issue into a wider perspective by assessing (1) whether the unemployment-suicide link is modified by the degree of unemployment protection, and (2) whether the effect on suicide of the present crisis differs from the effects of previous economic downturns.

    Methods: We analysed the unemployment-suicide link using time-series data for 30 countries spanning the period 1960-2012. Separate fixed-effects models were estimated for each of five welfare state regimes with different levels of unemployment protection (Eastern, Southern, Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian and Scandinavian). We included an interaction term to capture the possible excess effect of unemployment during the Great Recession.

    Results: The largest unemployment increases occurred in the welfare state regimes with the least generous unemployment protection. The unemployment effect on male suicides was statistically significant in all welfare regimes, except the Scandinavian one. The effect on female suicides was significant only in the eastern European country group. There was a significant gradient in the effects, being stronger the less generous the unemployment protection. The interaction term capturing the possible excess effect of unemployment during the financial crisis was not significant.

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the more generous the unemployment protection the weaker the detrimental impact on suicide of the increasing unemployment during the Great Recession.

1 - 26 of 26
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